Archives de Tag: Jerome Robbins

Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

The extended apron thrust forward across where the orchestra should have been gave many seats at the Palais Garnier – already not renowned for visibility — scant sightlines unless you were in a last row and could stand up and tilt forward. Were these two “it’s a gala/not a gala” programs worth attending? Yes and/or no.

Evening  Number One: “Nureyev” on Thursday, October 8, at the Palais Garnier.

Nureyev’s re-thinkings of the relationship between male and female dancers always seek to tweak the format of the male partner up and out from glorified crane operator into that of race car driver. But that foot on the gas was always revved up by a strong narrative context.

Nutcracker pas de deux Acts One and Two

Gilbert generously offers everything to a partner and the audience, from her agile eyes through her ever-in-motion and vibrantly tensile body. A street dancer would say “the girlfriend just kills it.” Her boyfriend for this series, Paul Marque, first needs to learn how to live.

At the apex of the Act II pas of Nuts, Nureyev inserts a fiendishly complex and accelerating airborne figure that twice ends in a fish dive, of course timed to heighten a typically overboard Tchaikovsky crescendo. Try to imagine this: the stunt driver is basically trying to keep hold of the wheel of a Lamborghini with a mind of its own that suddenly goes from 0 to 100, has decided to flip while doing a U-turn, and expects to land safe and sound and camera-ready in the branches of that tree just dangling over the cliff.  This must, of course, be meticulously rehearsed even more than usual, as it can become a real hot mess with arms, legs, necks, and tutu all in getting in the way.  But it’s so worth the risk and, even when a couple messes up, this thing can give you “wow” shivers of delight and relief. After “a-one-a-two-a-three,” Marque twice parked Gilbert’s race car as if she were a vintage Trabant. Seriously: the combination became unwieldy and dull.

Marque continues to present everything so carefully and so nicely: he just hasn’t shaken off that “I was the best student in the class “ vibe. But where is the urge to rev up?  Smiling nicely just doesn’t do it, nor does merely getting a partner around from left to right. He needs to work on developing a more authoritative stage presence, or at least a less impersonal one.

 

Cendrillon

A ballerina radiating just as much oomph and chic and and warmth as Dorothée Gilbert, Alice Renavand grooved and spun wheelies just like the glowing Hollywood starlet of Nureyev’s cinematic imagination.  If Renavand “owned” the stage, it was also because she was perfectly in synch with a carefree and confident Florian Magnenet, so in the moment that he managed to make you forget those horrible gold lamé pants.

 

Swan Lake, Act 1

Gently furling his ductile fingers in order to clasp the wrists of the rare bird that continued to astonish him, Audric Bezard also (once again) demonstrated that partnering can be so much more than “just stand around and be ready to lift the ballerina into position, OK?” Here we had what a pas is supposed to be about: a dialogue so intense that it transcends metaphor.

You always feel the synergy between Bezard and Amandine Albisson. Twice she threw herself into the overhead lift that resembles a back-flip caught mid-flight. Bezard knows that this partner never “strikes a pose” but instead fills out the legato, always continuing to extend some part her movements beyond the last drop of a phrase. His choice to keep her in movement up there, her front leg dangerously tilting further and further over by miniscule degrees, transformed this lift – too often a “hoist and hold” more suited to pairs skating – into a poetic and sincere image of utter abandon and trust. The audience held its breath for the right reason.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Manfred

Bewildered, the audience nevertheless applauded wildly at the end of this agonized and out of context solo. Pretending to themselves they had understood, the audience just went with the flow of the seasoned dancer-actor. Mathias Heymann gave the moment its full dose of “ah me” angst and defied the limits of the little apron stage [these are people used to eating up space the size of a football field].

Pas de deux can mostly easily be pulled out of context and presented as is, since the theme generally gravitates from “we two are now falling in love,” and “yes, we are still in love,” to “hey, guys, welcome to our wedding!” But I have doubts about the point of plunging both actor and audience into an excerpt that lacks a shared back-story. Maybe you could ask Juliet to do the death scene a capella. Who doesn’t know the “why” of that one? But have most of us ever actually read Lord Byron, much less ever heard of this Manfred? The program notes that the hero is about to be reunited by Death [spelled with a capital “D”] with his beloved Astarté. Good to know.

Don Q

Francesco Mura somehow manages to bounce and spring from a tiny unforced plié, as if he just changed his mind about where to go. But sometimes the small preparation serves him less well. Valentine Colasante is now in a happy and confident mind-set, having learned to trust her body. She now relaxes into all the curves with unforced charm and easy wit.

R & J versus Sleeping Beauty’s Act III

In the Balcony Scene with Miriam Ould-Braham, Germain Louvet’s still boyish persona perfectly suited his Juliet’s relaxed and radiant girlishness. But then, when confronted by Léonore Baulac’s  Beauty, Louvet once again began to seem too young and coltish. It must hard make a connection with a ballerina who persists in exteriorizing, in offering up sharply-outlined girliness. You can grin hard, or you can simply smile.  Nothing is at all wrong with Baulac’s steely technique. If she could just trust herself enough to let a little bit of the air out of her tires…She drives fast but never stops to take a look at the landscape.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

As the Beatles once sang a very, very, long time ago:

 « Baby, you can drive my car
Yes, I’m gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I’ll love you »

Evening Two: “Etoiles.”  Tuesday, October 13, 2020.

We were enticed back to the Palais Garnier for a thing called “Etoiles {Stars] de l’Opera,” where the program consisted of…anything and everything in a very random way.  (Plus a bit of live music!)

Clair de lune by Alistair Marriott (2017) was announced in the program as a nice new thing. Nice live Debussy happened, because the house pianist Elena Bonnay, just like the best of dancers, makes all music fill out an otherwise empty space.

Mathieu Ganio, sporting a very pretty maxi-skort, opened his arms sculpturally, did a few perfect plies à la seconde, and proffered up a few light contractions. At the end, all I could think of was Greta Garbo’s reaction to her first kiss in the film Ninochka: “That was…restful.”  Therefore:

Trois Gnossiennes, by Hans van Manen and way back from 1982, seemed less dated by comparison.  The same plié à la seconde, a few innie contractions, a flexed foot timed to a piano chord for no reason whatever, again. Same old, eh? Oddly, though, van Manen’s pure and pensive duet suited  Ludmila Paglerio and Hugo Marchand as  prettily as Marriott’s had for Ganio. While Satie’s music breathes at the same spaced-out rhythm as Debussy’s, it remains more ticklish. Noodling around in an  absinth-colored but lucid haze, this oddball composer also knew where he was going. I thought of this restrained little pas de deux as perhaps “Balanchine’s Apollo checks out a fourth muse.”  Euterpe would be my choice. But why not Urania?

And why wasn’t a bit of Kylian included in this program? After all, Kylain has historically been vastly more represented in the Paris Opera Ballet’s repertoire than van Manen will ever be.

The last time I saw Martha Graham’s Lamentation, Miriam Kamionka — parked into a side corridor of the Palais Garnier — was really doing it deep and then doing it over and over again unto exhaustion during  yet another one of those Boris Charmatz events. Before that stunt, maybe I had seen the solo performed here by Fanny Gaida during the ‘90’s. When Sae-Un Park, utterly lacking any connection to her solar plexus, had finished demonstrating how hard it is to pull just one tissue out of a Kleenex box while pretending it matters, the audience around me couldn’t even tell when it was over and waited politely for the lights to go off  and hence applaud. This took 3.5 minutes from start to end, according to the program.

Then came the duet from William Forsythe’s Herman Schmerman, another thingy that maybe also had entered into the repertoire around 2017. Again: why this one, when so many juicy Forsythes already belong to us in Paris? At first I did not remember that this particular Forsythe invention was in fact a delicious parody of “Agon.” It took time for Hannah O’Neill to get revved up and to finally start pushing back against Vincent Chaillet. Ah, Vincent Chaillet, forceful, weightier, and much more cheerfully nasty and all-out than I’d seen him for quite a while, relaxed into every combination with wry humor and real groundedness. He kept teasing O’Neill: who is leading, eh? Eh?! Yo! Yow! Get on up, girl!

I think that for many of us, the brilliant Ida Nevasayneva of the Trocks (or another Trock! Peace be with you, gals) kinda killed being ever to watch La Mort du cygne/Dying Swan without desperately wanting to giggle at even the idea of a costume decked with feathers or that inevitable flappy arm stuff. Despite my firm desire to resist, Ludmila Pagliero’s soft, distilled, un-hysterical and deeply dignified interpretation reconciled me to this usually overcooked solo.  No gymnastic rippling arms à la Plisetskaya, no tedious Russian soul à la Ulanova.  Here we finally saw a really quietly sad, therefore gut-wrenching, Lamentation. Pagliero’s approach helped me understand just how carefully Michael Fokine had listened to our human need for the aching sound of a cello [Ophélie Gaillard, yes!] or a viola, or a harp  — a penchant that Saint-Saens had shared with Tchaikovsky. How perfectly – if done simply and wisely by just trusting the steps and the Petipa vibe, as Pagliero did – this mini-epic could offer a much less bombastic ending to Swan Lake.

Suite of Dances brought Ophélie Gaillard’s cello back up downstage for a face to face with Hugo Marchand in one of those “just you and me and the music” escapades that Jerome Robbins had imagined a long time before a “platform” meant anything less than a stage’s wooden floor.  I admit I had preferred the mysterious longing Mathias Heymann had brought to the solo back in 2018 — especially to the largo movement. Tonight, this honestly jolly interpretation, infused with a burst of “why not?” energy, pulled me into Marchand’s space and mindset. Here was a guy up there on stage daring to tease you, me, and oh yes the cellist with equally wry amusement, just as Baryshnikov once had dared.  All those little jaunty summersaults turn out to look even cuter and sillier on a tall guy. The cocky Fancy Free sailor struts in part four were tossed off in just the right way: I am and am so not your alpha male, but if you believe anything I’m sayin’, we’re good to go.

The evening wound down with a homeopathic dose of Romantic frou-frou, as we were forced to watch one of those “We are so in love. Yes, we are still in love” out of context pas de deux, This one was extracted from John Neumeier’s La Dame aux Camélias.

An ardent Mathieu Ganio found himself facing a Laura Hecquet devoted to smoothing down her fluffy costume and stiff hair. When Neumeier’s pas was going all horizontal and swoony, Ganio gamely kept replacing her gently onto her pointes as if she deserved valet parking.  But unlike, say, Anna Karina leaning dangerously out of her car to kiss Belmondo full throttle in Pierrot le Fou, Hecquet simply refused to hoist herself even one millimeter out of her seat for the really big lifts. She was dead weight, and I wanted to scream. Unlike almost any dancer I have ever seen, Hecquet still persists in not helping her co-driver. She insists on being hoisted and hauled around like a barrel. Partnering should never be about driving the wrong way down a one-way street.

Commentaires fermés sur Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Ballet de l’Opéra: l’art du passe-partout

Soirée du 13 octobre

Le programme néoclassique présenté à Garnier, sottement et faussement intitulé Étoiles de l’Opéra – sottement parce qu’un rang hiérarchique dans une distribution ne fait pas un projet, et faussement parce qu’on trouve, dans le lot, trois premiers danseurs – aligne paresseusement : deux entrées au répertoire de 2017 (Trois Gnossiennes d’Hans van Manen, le pas de deux d’Herman Schmerman de William Forsythe), deux reprises de la saison 2018/2019 (A suite of Dances de Robbins, un extrait de La Dame aux camélias), et deux pièces de gala également revues récemment (Lamentation de Graham, mobilisée par 20 danseurs pour le XXe siècle de Boris Charmatz il y a cinq ans, et La Mort du cygne de Fokine, présentée à l’occasion du mini-gala Chauviré). Seule nouveauté en ces lieux, le Clair de lune d’Alastair Marriott (2017) semble fait pour magnifier les qualités et la plastique de Mathieu Ganio, mais peine à élever sa nécessité au niveau du clair-obscur liquide de la musique de Debussy. À peine la pièce vue, tout ce dont j’étais capable de me souvenir était : « il me faut ce pantalon, idéalement aéré pour la touffeur des fonds de loge. »

Trois Gnossiennes réunit – comme la dernière fois – Ludmila Pagliero et Hugo Marchand, et on se dit – comme la dernière fois – qu’ils sont un peu trop déliés et élégants pour cet exercice de style. Et puis, vers le milieu du deuxième mouvement, on s’avise de leurs mains toutes plates, et on se laisse gagner par leur prestation imperturbable, leur interprétation comme blanche d’intention, presque mécanique – je t’attrape par la bottine, tu développes ton arabesque en l’air, n’allons pas chercher du sens.

Sae Eun Park exécute Lamentation sans y apporter une once d’épaisseur. On a l’impression de voir une image. Pas un personnage qui aurait des entrailles. Les jeux d’ombre autour du banc finissent par retenir davantage l’attention. Quand vient le pas de deux si joueur d’Herman Schmerman, l’œil frisote à nouveau pour les danseurs, mais l’interaction entre Hannah O’Neil et Vincent Chaillet manque un peu de piment ; c’est dommage, car le premier danseur est remarquable de style, alliant la bonne dose d’explosivité et de chewing-gummitude tant dans son solo que durant le finale en jupette jaune.

Ludmila Pagliero propose de jolies choses : son cygne donne l’air de lutter contre la mort, plus que de s’y résigner. Il y a, vers la fin, comme la résistance d’un dos blessé. Mais je vois plus l’intelligence dramatique de la ballerine qu’un véritable oiseau.

À ma grande surprise, dans A suite of Dances, Hugo Marchand me laisse sur le bord du chemin. Je le trouve trop élégant et altier dans ce rôle en pyjama rouge où se mêlent danse de caractère, désinvolture, jazzy et cabotinage. Mon érudit voisin Cléopold me souffle que l’interprète a l’intelligence de faire autre chose que du Barychnikov, et peut-être ai-je mauvais goût, mais le côté Mitteleuropa meets Broadway,  entre caractère et histrionisme, me semble consubstantiel à l’œuvre, et mal accordé aux facilités et au physique de l’étoile Marchand. Il y a deux ans, François Alu m’avait bien plus convaincant, tant dans l’ironie que dans l’introspection quasi-dépressive. J’ai eu le sentiment que Marchand n’était pas fait pour ce rôle (ça arrive : Jessye Norman n’était pas une Carmen), mais c’est peut-être parce qu’il ne correspond pas à ma conception du violoncelle, que je vois comme un instrument terrien, au son dense et au grain serré, douloureux par éclats.

La soirée se termine avec Mathieu Ganio en Armand et Laura Hecquet en camélia blanc à froufrous dans le pas de deux dit de la campagne. Ce passage, qui n’est véritablement touchant qu’inséré dans  une narration d’ensemble, enchaîne les portés compliqués – dont certains se révèlent ici laborieux, d’autant que la robe s’emmêle. Les moments les plus réussis sont ceux du soudain rapprochement amoureux (déboulé déboulé déboulé par terre, et hop, bisou !). Si Ganio est un amoureux tout uniment ravi, Laura Hecquet fait ressentir la gratitude de son personnage face à un amour inespéré pour elle. Sa Marguerite a comme conscience de la fragilité de son existence.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

1 commentaire

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Les Saisons de l’Opéra : mémoires de loge, oubliettes de strapontin

Gustave Doré : le public des théâtres parisiens.

Faisons une pause dans notre exploration des saisons de l’Opéra de Paris depuis un demi-siècle. Partant d’un constat visible à l’œil nu (la chute de la part des œuvres classiques et néoclassiques, nette depuis le début du XXe siècle), nous avons scruté le sort fait aux vieilleries, dont une grande partie moisit dans l’oubli. À tort ou à raison ? Beaucoup de questions restent à trancher, mais c’est à présent l’été, et nous avons bien gagné le droit à un peu de légèreté.

Observons donc le temps qui passe à travers un petit bout de lorgnette. Aujourd’hui, on classera les œuvres non par leur âge ou leur style, mais par leur caractère récurrent. Quelles sont les pièces qu’on voit le plus souvent ? Sont-ce toujours les mêmes au fil du temps ? Suffit-il d’être dansé souvent pour échapper au péril des oubliettes ? (Bon d’accord, en termes de frivolité, c’est un peu décevant, mais recenser les œuvres en fonction de la couleur des costumes aurait pris trop de temps).

Piliers (Gustave Doré)

Les pièces présentées plus de 10 fois dans les 49 dernières années sont les piliers de la maison (Figure 16). Elles sont au nombre de 15. Au haut du palmarès, les apparemment indétrônables Lac des Cygnes et Giselle (programmés environ tous les 2 ans en moyenne), suivis des blockbusters attendus (Sylphide, Belle, DQ, Bayadère, etc.) mais aussi d’autres pièces à effectif plus réduit (Afternoon, Le Fils prodigue ou Agon), dont des séries sont programmées tous les 3 à 4 ans.

Ces piliers sont tous assez solides, à l’exception de Petrouchka, à la présence relativement plus fragile (l’œuvre n’a pas été dansée à Paris depuis plus de 10 ans, sa présence a connu deux éclipses de 8 et 12 années, et les dernières programmations sont plus espacées qu’auparavant).

« Loges » (Gustave Doré)

Un cran en dessous en termes de fréquence sur scène, on a décidé de nommer « Loges » les pièces qui ont été présentées sur la scène de Garnier ou de Bastille entre 6 et 9 fois lors des 49 dernières saisons. Viennent ensuite les « Chaises » (entre 3 et 5), les « Strapontins » (2 fois) et les « Places debout » (1 fois).

Tout le monde aura compris la métaphore : on est moins à son aise juché sur son strapontin qu’assis sur une chaise, et les titulaires des places debout sont les moins bien installés. Logiquement, le nombre d’œuvres dans chaque catégorie va croissant : en regard des 15 piliers-superstar, on compte 33 loges, 72 chaises, 86 strapontins et 222 places debout (pour éviter les aberrations historiques, la douzaine d’œuvres anciennes programmées une seule fois pendant la période 1972-2021, mais dont on sait qu’elles étaient souvent dansées auparavant, sont rangées non pas en « place debout », mais par approximation dans une catégorie supérieure).

Être une Loge est-il une garantie de pérennité ? Pas si sûr… Certaines œuvres de cette catégorie peuvent prétendre au rang de futurs piliers, par exemple Le Parc, En Sol, In the Night, déjà programmés à neuf reprises pour plus de 100 représentations depuis leur entrée au répertoire.

Mais de l’autre côté du spectre, il est prouvé qu’une loge peut tomber en ruine. Ainsi d’Istar (Lifar, 1941), pièce représentée une bonne centaine de fois à l’Opéra selon les comptages d’Ivor Guest, mais dont la dernière programmation en 1990 pourrait bien avoir été le chant du cygne. Plus près de nous, la Coppélia de Lacotte (1973), dont des séries ont été dansées sept fois en moins de 10 ans, a ensuite connu une éclipse de huit ans, avant une dernière programmation, en 1991, qui sera peut-être la dernière.

Hormis ces deux œuvres en péril d’oubliettes, on repère quelque fragilité – les teintures s’effilochent, la peinture s’écaille, les fauteuils se gondolent – dans le statut d’œuvres comme Tchaïkovski-pas de deux, Raymonda, Les Mirages, les Noces de Nijinska ou le Sacre du Printemps de Béjart. Un indice de décrépitude – plus ou moins flagrant selon les cas – réside dans l’écart soudain entre l’intervalle moyen de programmation et le temps écoulé entre les dernières séries. Quand une œuvre autrefois programmée souvent connaît soudain des éclipses plus ou moins longues, c’est que du point de vue de la direction, elle est plus du côté de la porte que de la promotion (Figure 17).

À ce compte, ce sont le Sacre de Béjart, les Noces et Les Mirages, qui semblent les plus fragiles : non seulement l’écart entre deux séries s’allonge significativement, mais en plus, la dernière date de programmation commence aussi à être éloignée dans le passé.

Dans une moindre mesure, ce phénomène touche le répertoire balanchinien (Tchaïkovski-pas de deux, et Sonatine) dont la fréquence s’amenuise au fil du temps, ainsi que Raymonda (dont la date de reprogrammation après le rendez-vous manqué de décembre 2019 sera sans doute décisive).

En dehors de ces huit cas (24% du total quand même…), la majorité des 33 œuvres-Loge semble solidement implantée dans le répertoire (on compte parmi elles Suite en blanc, Paquita, Le Sacre de Pina Bausch, Cendrillon, Manon, La Dame aux Camélias, The Concert, Joyaux…). Mais on ne peut s’empêcher de remarquer que cinq autres pièces de Balanchine – Serenade, Symphonie en ut, Les Quatre tempéraments, Violon concerto et Concerto Barocco – se font plus rares au fil du temps (le temps écoulé entre deux séries ayant tendance à s’allonger de moitié par rapport au passé, ce qui n’est peut-être pas sans effet sur le résultat sur scène…).

« Chaises » (Cham)

De manière plus synthétique, mais en utilisant les mêmes critères, l’analyse de l’état de conservation des Chaises, Strapontins et Place debout donne des résultats assez prévisibles. Ainsi, les Chaises (programmées entre 3 et 5 fois) se répartissent à part presque égales entre solidité, fragilité et décrépitude (Figure 18).

Parmi les Chaises en ruine ou en péril à l’Opéra de Paris, on repère – outre les œuvres de Skibine, Clustine, Lifar, Massine, Fokine… dont on a déjà évoqué la disparition lors de nos précédentes pérégrinations – le Pas de dieux de Gene Kelly (création en 1960, dernière représentation 1975), Adagietto d’Oscar Araïz (entrée au répertoire 1977, dernière apparition en 1990), mais aussi Density 21,5 (1973) et Slow, Heavy and Blue (1981) de Carolyn Carlson, Casanova (Preljocaj, 1998), Clavigo (Petit, 1999), et Wuthering Heights (Belarbi, 2002). Par ailleurs, certaines pièces entrées au répertoire au tournant des années 1980, comme le Jardin aux Lilas (Tudor), Auréole (Taylor), Divertimento n°15 (Balanchine) ou Sinfonietta (Kylian) ne semblent pas avoir fait souche, et en tout cas, s’éclipsent au cours des années 1990.

Les Chaises un peu bancales – renaissance pas impossible, mais présence en pointillé en dernière période –, incluent certaines entrées au répertoire de Neumeier (Sylvia, Vaslaw  et le Songe d’une nuit d’été), Tzigane (Balanchine), la Giselle de Mats Ek, Dark Elegies (Tudor), Le Chant de la Terre (MacMillan), The Vertiginous Thrill of Exactitude (Forsythe), et – parmi les créations Maison – Caligula (Le Riche), et La Petite danseuse de Degas (Patrice Bart).

« Strapontins » (Cham)

La situation est par nature plus précaire pour les Strapontins, et encore plus pour les Places debout. Et notre classement devient forcément sommaire, principalement corrélé à l’ancienneté de la dernière représentation : un Strapontin déplié une dernière fois il y a plus de 30 ans est tout rouillé, et une Place debout qui n’a pas bougé depuis 20 ans est ankylosée de partout. Les créations un peu plus récentes sont dites fragiles, faute de mieux, et on évite de se prononcer sur les dernières nées : l’avenir des Noces de Pontus Lidberg, par exemple, est imprévisible.

Bien sûr, les 222 Places debout, majoritaires en nombre, ne constituent pas la moitié des spectacles : présentées moins souvent, dans des jauges plus petites, ou occupant une partie de soirée, elles représentent une part minime de l’offre… sauf, et c’est troublant, dans la période récente.

Alors qu’entre 1972 et 2015, les œuvres programmées une seule fois composaient en moyenne 9% de l’offre (nous ne parlons plus ici de nombre d’œuvres, mais de leur part pondérée dans les saisons), lors du septennat en cours, cette part triple, pour atteindre 27%, signe d’une accélération de la tendance au renouvellement dans les saisons Millepied et Dupont (Figure 19).

Ce phénomène n’est pas seulement dû à l’absence de recul historique (les entrées au répertoire sont forcément Debout, avant éventuellement de monter en grade) : lors de la période précédente, seules deux pièces (Daphnis et Chloé de Millepied, et le Boléro de Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui et Damien Jalet), étaient des créations vouées à être reprises quelque temps après. Et elles ne représentent que 1,1% de l’offre 2008-2015 (autrement dit, le passage du temps ne change pas beaucoup la donne).

Au demeurant, la rupture est visible de l’autre côté du spectre : la part combinée des Piliers et des Loges s’estompe au fil du temps (de plus de 60% sur la période 1972-2001, à moins de 50% lors des 20 dernières années). Un signe que l’instabilité gagne du terrain ?

[A SUIVRE]

« Places debout » (Daumier)

 

1 commentaire

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Les Saisons de l’Opéra : Raymond, qu’as-tu fait de ton stock ?

André Eglevsky, « Le Spectre de la Rose », par ALex Gard

Résumé des deux épisodes précédents: la part du classique dans les saisons de l’Opéra de Paris diminue sur longue période, celle des œuvres issues du XIXe siècle aussi (c’est logique). Mais quid des créations du premier tiers du XXe siècle?

Penchons-nous donc sur les créations post-1900, en gros à partir des Ballets russes. C’est là que les difficultés commencent, car d’une part les univers chorégraphiques se diffractent (troupe Diaghilev et ses démembrements, galaxie Vic-Wells, expérimentations expressionnistes, etc.), d’autre part leur présence dans les saisons de l’Opéra est à la fois inégale et instable.

Il est donc bien plus malaisé de repérer à la fois les œuvres qui s’imposent d’elles-mêmes par leur récurrence et leur prégnance dans l’imaginaire collectif, mais aussi de les classer a priori.

Prenons donc une autre méthode, et demandant pardon à votre délicatesse pour le vocabulaire employé. Notre période d’analyse démarrant en 1972, on appellera « Stock XXe » toutes les œuvres parmi lesquelles on peut « piocher » pour construire sa programmation (qu’elles aient déjà été dansées à Garnier, ou qu’on veuille les y présenter pour la première fois). Imaginez Raymond Franchetti, directeur de la danse de 1972 à 1977, et inventeur des saisons de ballet telles que nous les connaissons aujourd’hui, contempler chaque pièce du stock d’un œil interrogatif : « je la programme-t-y ou je la programme-t-y pas ? » (il est né à Aubervilliers, notre reconstitution lui prête un accent faubourien).

À l’époque, les vols transatlantiques existent, on passe par-dessus la Manche autant qu’on veut, le monde de la danse est dès longtemps international, et tout circule vite : fait partie du vivier tout ce qu’on a pu voir ou dont on a pu entendre parler à temps pour avoir envie de le programmer, donc toute œuvre créée en 1970 au plus tard (car en 1971, on finalise déjà le programme de l’année suivante : In the Night fait partie du stock, Les Variations Goldberg, non).

Collecter les ingrédients du « Franchetti éternel »

Le stock potentiel 1901-1970 est, bien sûr, un ensemble immense (certaines œuvres créées pendant la période n’ont jamais été dansées par le ballet de l’Opéra, elles ne sont pas « au répertoire » comme dit la régie de la danse). Par ailleurs, le stock constaté est une reconstitution après-coup (car certaines œuvres de la période n’ont fait leur « entrée au répertoire » que longtemps après leur création).

Enfin, le vrai stock d’œuvres créées sur notre planète s’enrichit chaque année (le stock Lefèvre, directrice de la danse 1995-2014, étant plus large que le stock Hightower, directrice de 1980 à 1983, etc.).

Mais à élargir sans cesse les marges, on arriverait à considérer que tout est stock, ce qui n’aurait pas de sens pour l’analyse. Effectivement, Aurélie Dupont peut faire son marché dans tout le XXe siècle, mais nous n’avons pas envie de nous mettre dans la tête d’Aurélie.

Nous préférons imaginer un Franchetti éternel qui aurait présidé à tous les choix de programmation patrimoniale jusqu’à présent, et à qui on pourrait demander :  Raymond, qu’as-tu fait de ton stock ? (Les amoureux de la vraisemblance plaident pour une reformulation en : Raymond, qu’a-t-on fait de ton stock?, mais nous ne sommes pas de ce genre-là).

Si vous nous avez suivis jusqu’ici, vous savez que c’est le moment d’un petit graphique. La part des œuvres de la période considérée dans la totalité des saisons s’établit à un niveau assez stable, aux alentours de 18%. L’évolution sur longue période n’apparaît que si l’on décompose un peu.

Le stock Franchetti « mis en boîtes » à la hussarde.

Tâchons d’expliquer, à présent la figure n°6 ci-dessus. En fait, l’univers chorégraphique du stock Franchetti n’est pas aussi hétérogène qu’on pouvait le craindre. Mais comme nous aimons bien les graphiques à trois couleurs, nous l’avons encore simplifié. Ainsi, la catégorie Ballets russes inclut-elle, au-delà de Diaghilev, les démembrements de fin de parcours (Le Bal des cadets de David Lichine, période Colonel de Basil), ainsi que les créations des Ballets suédois (la recréation de Relâche de Jean Börlin, 1924, production de 1979).

On a aussi éhontément amalgamé en « Monde anglo-saxon » des chorégraphes aussi divers qu’Antony Tudor (Le Jardin aux Lilas, 1936), Agnes de Mille (Fall River Legend, 1948), José Limon (La Pavane du Maure, 1949), Paul Taylor (Auréole, 1962), John Cranko, Frederick Ashton, Jerome Robbins et George Balanchine dans sa période américaine (car ce dernier a été délicatement écartelé : les productions antérieures au Bourgeois gentilhomme sont comptées chez les Ballets russes).

Anthony Tudor par Alex Gard

Enfin, on a réuni en une autre grosse catégorie fourre-tout, « Chorégraphes Maison », toutes les œuvres dues aux chorégraphes liés, de près ou de loin, à l’Opéra de Paris. Cela inclut tous les anciens directeurs de la danse, dont les créations (pas forcément pour l’Opéra) étaient encore jouées à l’aube des années septante (pas forcément pour très longtemps) : Léo Staats (Soir de fête, 1925), Ivan Clustine (Suites de danses, 1913), Serge Lifar (de son Icare de 1935 aux Variations de 1953), George Skibine (Daphnis et Chloé, 1959), Michel Descombey (Symphonie concertante, 1962). On compte aussi dans le lot Victor Gsovsky (Grand pas classique, 1949), car il a été maître de ballet à Garnier (et puis l’œuvre, bien que créée au TCE, a été réglée sur Yvette Chauviré et Wladimir Skouratoff). Et l’on annexe aussi au contingent « Maison » les Études (1948) d’Harald Lander, car ce dernier a tout de même dirigé un temps l’école de danse de l’Opéra.

On l’aura compris, nous avons l’adoption facile. Mais aussi cavalier que cela paraisse, ceci n’est pas irraisonné: il est courant que chaque grande école de ballet ait son chorégraphe attitré (Bournonville à Copenhague, Ashton au Royal Ballet après 1945, puis MacMillan, Cranko à Stuttgart et, plus près de nous, Neumeier à Hambourg), dont les productions contribuent à forger l’identité stylistique du lieu. Que cette pratique courante soit contrecarrée, à Paris, par une relative instabilité directoriale n’enlève rien au fait qu’il est justifié et intéressant – ne serait-ce qu’à titre de comparaison avec les autres maisons – de pister le sort fait à la production endémique. Par ailleurs, comme l’a montré Cléopold pour Suites de danses, certaines pièces-maison ne visent-elles pas précisément à acclimater les tendances du jour au style propre à la compagnie, ou à en magnifier les possibilités ? Enfin, la plupart des œuvres comptées dans le contingent-maison ont été soit créées pour l’Opéra de Paris soit conçues et présentées dans son orbite proche.

C’est pourquoi Roland Petit et Maurice Béjart sont enrôlés sous la bannière-maison, en dépit de la brièveté de la relation institutionnelle du premier avec l’Opéra (quelques semaines virtuelles à la direction de la danse en 1970) et de son caractère tumultueux pour le second (avec de sérieuses bisbilles au cours du mandat Noureev). Tout cela pourrait être débattu, mais ce qui compte pour notre propos est que, aussi indépendante qu’ait été leur carrière, elle n’en a pas moins fait, et durablement, quelques allers-retours avec la Grande boutique (Notre-Dame de Paris et L’Oiseau de feu sont tous deux des créations ONP).

Un petit coup de lorgnon dans chacune des boîtes …

Ceci étant posé, nous ne sommes pas des brutes. La catégorisation à la hussarde a le mérite de la lisibilité, mais ensuite, rien n’interdit de zoomer, et de retrouver le sens des nuances.

Alexandra Danilova, « Gaité Parisienne », par Alex Gard

Pour les Ballets russes, le rideau tombe lentement mais sûrement (figure n°7). Le phénix renaîtra peut-être de ses cendres après l’éclipse totale du septennat actuel, mais de toute même, la variété des œuvres et des chorégraphes se réduit comme peau de chagrin : dans le palmarès des œuvres représentées, seuls surnagent encore L’Après-midi d’un faune (1912), Apollon Musagète (1928, mais c’est à présent la version 1979 qui est le plus souvent représentée, et on pourrait la compter ailleurs), le Tricorne (1919), le Fils prodigue (1929) et Petrouchka (1911). Nijinska, dont Les Noces (1923), entrées au répertoire en 1976, étaient présentées assez souvent, est à présent proche de l’oubli dans la maison (Le Train bleu et Les Biches, présentées au début des années 1990, n’ont pas fait souche).

Si l’on fait un rapide gros plan sur le monde anglo-saxon (on y reviendra), il est amusant de comparer les destins croisés de trois paires de chorégraphes qui à eux seuls, concentrent 95% du paquet (même quand on zoome, on aime créer des effets de flou). La figure n°8 contraste le sort de trois tandems rassemblés à la diable :

George Balanchine dans ses années Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo par Alex Gard

  • Les duettistes Tudor/Taylor n’ont pas grand-chose en partage (en tout cas, ni l’âge, ni le style), hormis un destin commun au regard des saisons parisiennes : une percée assez notable, mais peu durable. Qui se souvient qu’Auréole (1962) a été programmé à huit reprises entre 1974 et 1996 ? Et qu’au tournant des années 1990, l’Opéra avait rendu hommage à Antony Tudor (1908-1987) en présentant quatre fois, de manière rapprochée, aussi bien Le Jardin aux lilas (1936) que Dark Elegies (1937) ?
  • Par contraste, l’ascension dans les saisons des rejetons de la filière Vic-Wells-Royal Ballet, John Cranko (Onéguine, 1965), et Frederick Ashton (La Fille mal gardée, 1960), est plus récente, mais aussi plus forte, et probablement plus durable (la petite touche orangée durant la période 1979-1986 est due à un passage-éclair au répertoire du Roméo et Juliette de Cranko, 1962).
  • Rien de facétieux, enfin, dans le rapprochement entre les deux chorégraphes iconiques du NYCB, dont la présence dans les saisons est en pente ascendante.

Le sort des chorégraphes-maison « en conserve »

Last but not least, que met en évidence un petit gros plan sur la section « Maison » de notre stock Raymond ? Fidèles à notre manie des rapprochements hardis et des acronymes stupides, nous réunissons dans un seul paquet les hommes qui n’ont qu’une pièce au répertoire durant toute la période 1972-2021 (Lander=Études, Clustine=Suites de Danse, Staats=Soir de fête, Descombey=Symphonie concertante, etc.) ainsi que Georges Skibine (qui en a trois, mais elles disparaissent vite : Daphnis et Chloé, La Péri et Concerto). Cet être collectif sera nommé HSO&S (pour Hommes d’une Seule Œuvre & Skibine ; on lui donne, pour années de naissance et mort, la médiane des dates des huit personnes concernées). N’échappent à notre logique de groupement que Serge Lifar, Maurice Béjart et Roland Petit.

La figure n°9 parle d’elle-même : HSO&S ne survit que par la grâce d’Études. Sans l’annexion de Lander aux Chorégraphes-Maison, le stock endémique hors-Lifar (10 œuvres créées entre 1913 – Suites de danses – et 1969 – Ecce Homo de Lazzini) aurait disparu encore plus vite : hors Études (qui revient encore tous les dix ans : 1994, 2004, 2014), les seuls presque-survivants sont Soir de fête (dernier soir pour l’œuvre en 1997) et le Grand pas classique (dernière présentation en soirée régulière en mars 1982 ; les reprises par l’École, en 1987, et les 5 soirées de gala entre 1991 et 2020 ne valent pas résurrection).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L’intérêt programmatique pour Serge Lifar rebondit un peu dans les années qui suivent son décès (6 œuvres présentées, à un niveau qui reste très modeste dans l’offre globale), mais le phénomène s’apparente à un feu de paille (Figure n°10). Par la suite, le répertoire vivant se réduit progressivement (bientôt, ne restera-t-il que Suite en blanc ? ).

Quant aux œuvres de jeunesse de Béjart, elles se maintiennent correctement : des cinq pièces présentées entre 1972 et 1979 (période qu’on peut nommer « septennat Franchetti-Verdy »), toutes sont encore présentées lors des 21 dernières années (Le Sacre et L’Oiseau de feu, l’increvable Boléro, mais aussi Serait-ce la mort ? et Webern op. 5). Il reste que la part des œuvres du chorégraphe dans les saisons baisse nettement dans la période actuelle.

Pour l’heure, et pour finir, Roland Petit n’est pas non plus trop mal servi, avec le maintien sur le long terme de pièces dansées par le ballet de l’Opéra dès les années 1970 (Notre-Dame de Paris, Le Loup), et l’ajout au fil du temps d’œuvres des années 1940 (Carmen, le Rendez-vous, les Forains, Le Jeune homme et la mort).

Il n’y a guère que Formes (1967), pas de deux silencieux avec habillage sonore de Marius Constant, qui ait disparu de la scène. Cette incursion de Roland Petit dans l’expérimental a été dansée pour la dernière fois à Favart en 1978, avec en alternance, Wilfride Piollet et Jean Guizerix, ou Ghislaine Thesmar et Jean-Pierre Franchetti. Jean-Pierre ? Le fils de Raymond !

[À SUIVRE]

Commentaires fermés sur Les Saisons de l’Opéra : Raymond, qu’as-tu fait de ton stock ?

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Les Balletos d’or 2018-2019

Gravure extraite des « Petits mystères de l’Opéra ». 1844

La publication des Balletos d’or 2018-2019 est plus tardive que les années précédentes. Veuillez nous excuser de ce retard, bien indépendant de notre volonté. Ce n’est pas par cruauté que nous avons laissé la planète ballet toute entière haleter d’impatience une semaine de plus que d’habitude. C’est parce qu’il nous a quasiment fallu faire œuvre d’archéologie ! Chacun sait que, telle une fleur de tournesol suivant son astre, notre rédaction gravite autour du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Bien sûr, nous avons pléthore d’amours extra-parisiennes (notre coterie est aussi obsessionnelle que volage), mais quand il s’est agi de trouver un consensus sur les les points forts de Garnier et Bastille, salles en quasi-jachère depuis au moins trois mois, il y a eu besoin de mobiliser des souvenirs déjà un peu lointains, et un des membres du jury (on ne dira pas qui) a une mémoire de poisson rouge.

 

Ministère de la Création franche

Prix Création : Christian Spuck (Winterreise, Ballet de Zurich)

Prix Tour de force : Thierry Malandain parvient à créer un ballet intime sur le sujet planche savonnée de Marie Antoinette (Malandain Ballet Biarritz)

Prix Inattendu : John Cranko pour les péripéties incessantes du Concerto pour flûte et harpe (ballet de Stuttgart)

Prix Toujours d’Actualité : Kurt Jooss pour la reprise de La Table Verte par le Ballet national du Rhin

Prix Querelle de genre : Les deux versions (féminine/masculine) de Faun de David Dawson (une commande de Kader Belarbi pour le Ballet du Capitole)

Prix musical: Goat, de Ben Duke (Rambert Company)

Prix Inspiration troublante : « Aimai-je un rêve », le Faune de Debussy par Jeroen Verbruggen (Ballets de Monte Carlo, TCE).

Ministère de la Loge de Côté

Prix Narration : François Alu dans Suites of dances (Robbins)

Prix dramatique : Hugo Marchand et Dorothée Gilbert (Deux oiseaux esseulés dans le Lac)

Prix Versatilité : Ludmila Pagliero (épileptique chez Goecke, oiseau chez Ek, Cendrillon chrysalide chez Noureev)

Pri(ze) de risque : Alina Cojocaru et Joseph Caley pour leur partenariat sans prudence (Manon, ENB)

Prix La Lettre et l’Esprit : Álvaro Rodriguez Piñera pour son accentuation du style de Roland Petit (Quasimodo, Notre Dame de Paris. Ballet de Bordeaux)

Prix Limpidité : Claire Lonchampt et son aura de ballerine dans Marie-Antoinette (Malandain Ballet Biarritz).

Ministère de la Place sans visibilité

Prix Singulier-Pluriels : Pablo Legasa pour l’ensemble de sa saison

Prix Je suis encore là : Le corps de Ballet de l’Opéra, toujours aussi précis et inspiré bien que sous-utilisé (Cendrillon, Le lac des Cygnes de Noureev)

Prix Quadrille, ça brille : Ambre Chiarcosso, seulement visible hors les murs (Donizetti-Legris/Delibes Suite-Martinez. « De New York à Paris »).

Prix Batterie : Andréa Sarri (La Sylphide de Bournonville. « De New York à Paris »)

Prix Tambour battant : Philippe Solano, prince Buonaparte dans le pas de deux de la Belle au Bois dormant (« Dans les pas de Noureev », Ballet du Capitole).

Prix Le Corps de ballet a du Talent : Jérémy Leydier pour A.U.R.A  de Jacopo Godani et Kiki la Rose de Michel Kelemenis (Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse)

Prix Seconde éternelle : Muriel Zusperreguy, Prudence (La Dame aux camélias de Neumeier) et M (Carmen de Mats Ek).

Prix Anonyme : les danseurs de Dog Sleep, qu’on n’identifie qu’aux saluts (Goecke).

Ministère de la Ménagerie de scène

Prix Cygne noir : Matthew Ball (Swan Lake de Matthew Bourne, Sadler’s Wells)

Prix Cygne blanc : Antonio Conforti dans le pas de deux de l’acte 4 du Lac de Noureev (Programme de New York à Paris, Les Italiens de l’Opéra de Paris et les Stars of American Ballet).

Prix Gerbille sournoise (Nuts’N Roses) : Eléonore Guérineau en princesse Pirlipat accro du cerneau (Casse-Noisette de Christian Spuck, Ballet Zurich).

Prix Chien et Chat : Valentine Colasante et Myriam Ould-Braham, sœurs querelleuses et sadiques de Cendrillon (Noureev)

Prix Bête de vie : Oleg Rogachev, Quasimodo tendre et brisé (Notre Dame de Paris de Roland Petit, Ballet de Bordeaux)

Prix gratouille : Marco Goecke pour l’ensemble de son œuvre (au TCE et à Garnier)

Ministère de la Natalité galopante

Prix Syndrome de Stockholm : Davide Dato, ravisseur de Sylvia (Wiener Staatsballett)

Prix Entente Cordiale : Alessio Carbone. Deux écoles se rencontrent sur scène et font un beau bébé (Programme « De New York à Paris », Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris/NYCB)

Prix Soft power : Alice Leloup et Oleg Rogachev dans Blanche Neige de Preljocaj (Ballet de Bordeaux)

Prix Mari sublime : Mickaël Conte, maladroit, touchant et noble Louis XVI (Marie-Antoinette, Malandain Ballet Biarritz)

Prix moiteur : Myriam Ould-Braham et Audric Bezard dans Afternoon of a Faun de Robbins (Hommage à J. Robbins, Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris)

Prix Les amants magnifiques : Amandine Albisson et Audric Bezard dans La Dame aux camélias (Opéra de Paris)

Ministère de la Collation d’Entracte

Prix Brioche : Marion Barbeau (L’Été, Cendrillon)

Prix Cracotte : Emilie Cozette (L’Été, Cendrillon)

Prix Slim Fast : les 53 minutes de la soirée Lightfoot-Leon-van Manen

Prix Pantagruélique : Le World Ballet Festival, Tokyo

Prix indigeste : les surtitres imposés par Laurent Brunner au Marie-Antoinette de Thierry Malandain à l’Opéra royal de Versailles

Prix Huile de foie de morue : les pneus dorés (Garnier) et la couronne de princesse Disney (Bastille) pour fêter les 350 ans de l’Opéra de Paris. Quand ça sera parti, on trouvera les 2 salles encore plus belles … Merci Stéphane !

Prix Disette : la deuxième saison d’Aurélie Dupont à l’Opéra de Paris

Prix Pique-Assiette : Aurélie Dupont qui retire le pain de la bouche des étoiles en activité pour se mettre en scène (Soirées Graham et Ek)

Ministère de la Couture et de l’Accessoire

Prix Supersize Me : les toujours impressionnants costumes de Montserrat Casanova pour Eden et Grossland de Maguy Marin (Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse)

Prix Cœur du sujet : Johan Inger, toujours en prise avec ses scénographies (Petrouchka, Ballets de Monte Carlo / Carmen, Etés de la Danse)

Prix à côté de la plaque : les costumes transparents des bidasses dans The Unknown Soldier (Royal Ballet)

Prix du costume économique : Simon Mayer (SunbengSitting)

Prix Patchwork : Paul Marque et ses interprétations en devenir (Fancy Free, Siegfried)

Prix Même pas Peur : Natalia de Froberville triomphe d’une tiare hors sujet pour la claque de Raymonda (Programme Dans les pas de Noureev, Ballet du Capitole)

Ministère de la Retraite qui sonne

Prix Laisse pas traîner tes bijoux n’importe où, Papi : William Forsythe (tournée du Boston Ballet)

Prix(se) beaucoup trop tôt : la retraite – mauvaise – surprise de Josua Hoffalt

Prix Sans rancune : Karl Paquette. Allez Karl, on ne t’a pas toujours aimé, mais tu vas quand même nous manquer !

Prix Noooooooon ! : Caroline Bance, dite « Mademoiselle Danse ». La fraicheur incarnée prend sa retraite

Prix Non mais VRAIMENT ! : Julien Meyzindi, au pic de sa progression artistique, qui part aussi (vers de nouvelles aventures ?)

Louis Frémolle par Gavarni. « Les petits mystères de l’Opéra ».

Commentaires fermés sur Les Balletos d’or 2018-2019

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs, Humeurs d'abonnés, Ici Londres!, Ici Paris, Retours de la Grande boutique, Une lettre de Vienne, Voices of America

Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

John Kriza, creator of the « romantic guy » in Fancy Free in 1944. Press photo.

Paris, Palais Garnier, November 6 and 13, 2018

FANCY FREE

Would the “too elegant dancers of Paris” – as American critics decry them – be able to “get down” and frolic their way through the so ‘merican Fancy Free? Would they know how to chew gum like da guys and play like wise-asses? Just who should be blamed for the cost of leasing this genre ballet from the Robbins Trust? If Robbins, who had delighted in staging so many of his ballets on the Paris company, had left this one to other companies for all these years…did he have a good reason?

On November 6th, the dancing, the acting, was not even “too elegant.” Everyone danced small. The ensemble’s focus was so low key that the ballet became lugubrious, weightless, charmless, an accumulation of pre-fab schtick. I have never paid more attention to what the steps are called, never spent the span of Fancy Free analyzing the phrases (oh yeah, this one ends with more double tours to the right) and groaning inwardly at all the “business.” First chewing gum scene? Invisible. Chomp the gum, guys! For the reprise, please don’t make it so ridiculously obvious that another three sticks were also hidden behind the lamppost by the stagehands. I have never said to myself: aha, let’s repeat “now we put our arms around each others’ shoulders and try hard to look like pals while not getting armpit sweat on each others’ costumes.” Never been so bored by unvaryingly slow double pirouettes and by the fake beers being so sloppily lifted that they clearly looked fake. The bar brawl? Lethargic and well nigh invisible (and I was in a place with good visibility).

Then the women. That scene where the girl with the red purse gets teased – an oddly wooden Alice Renavand — utterly lacked sass and became rather creepy and belligerent. As the dream girl in purple, Eleonora Abbagnato wafted a perfume of stiff poise. Ms. Purple proved inappropriately condescending and un-pliant: “I will now demonstrate the steps while wearing the costume of the second girl.“ She acted like a mildly amused tourist stuck in some random country. Karl Paquette had already been stranded by his male partners before he even tried to hit on this female: an over-interiorized Stéphane Bullion (who would nevertheless manage to hint at tiny little twinkles of humor in his tightly-wound rumba) and a François Alu emphatically devoted to defending his space. Face to face with the glacial Abbagnato, Paquette even gave up trying to make their duet sexy. This usually bright and alive dancing guy resigned himself to trying to salvage a limp turn around the floor by two very boring white people.

Then Aurelia Bellet sauntered in as the third girl –clearly amused that her wig was possessed by a character all on its own – and owned the joint. This girl would know how to snap her gum. I wanted the ballet to begin afresh.

A week later, on the 13th, the troops came ashore. Alessio Carbone (as the sailor who practically wants to split his pants in half), Paul Marque (really interesting as the dreamer: beautiful pliés anchored a legato unspooling of never predictable movement), and Alexandre Gasse (as a gleeful and carefree rumba guy) hit those buddy poses without leaving room for gusts of air to pass between them. Bounce and energy and humor came back into the streets of New York when they just tossed off those very tight Popeye flexes as little jokes, not poses, which is what they are supposed to be. The tap dancing riffs came off as natural, and you could practically hear them sayin’ “I wanna beer, I wanna girl.” Valentine Colasante radiated cool amusement and the infinite ways she reacted to every challenge in the “hand-off the big red purse” sequence established her alpha womanly dominance. Because of her subtle and reactive acting, there was not a creep in sight. Dorothée Gilbert, as the dame in purple, held on to the dreamy sweetness of the ballerina she’d already given in Robbins’s The Concert some years ago, and then took it forward. During the duet, she seemed to lead Marque, as acutely in tune with how to control a man’s reactions, as Colasante had just a few moments before. Sitting at the little table, watching the men peacock around, Gilbert’s body and face remained vivid and alive.

A SUITE OF DANCES

Sonia Wieder-Atherton concentrated deeply on her score and on her cello, emitting lovely sounds and offering a challenge to the dancing soloists. They were not going to get any of the kind of gimlet eye contact a Ma or a Rostropovich – or a rehearsal pianist – might have provided. On November 6th Matthias Heymann and on November 13th Hugo Marchand reacted to this absent but vibrating onstage presence in their own distinctive ways.

Heymann infused the falsely improvised aspect of the choreography with a sense of reminiscence. Sitting on the ground upstage and leaning back to look at her at the outset, you could feel he’d already just danced the thing one way. And we’d never see it. He’d dance it now differently, maybe in a more diffused manner. And, as he settled downstage at her feet once again at the end, you imagined how he would continue on and on, always the gentleman caller. Deeply rooted movement had spiraled out in an unending flow of elegant and deep inspiration, in spite of the musician who had ignored him. Strangely, this gave the audience the sense of being allowed to peek through a half-open studio door. We were witnessing a brilliant dancer whose body will never stop if music is around. Robbins should have called this piece “Isadora,” for it embodies all the principles the mother of modern dance called for: spontaneous and joyous movement engendered by opening up your ears and soul to how the music sings within you.

Heymann’s body is a pliant rectangle; Marchand’s a broad-shouldered triangle. Both types, I should point out, would fit perfectly into Leonardo’s outline of the Vitruvian Man. Where your center of gravity lies makes you move differently. The art is in learning how to use what nature has given you. If these two had been born in another time and place, I could see Merce Cunningham latching on to Heymann’s purity of motion and Paul Taylor eyeing the catch-me-if-you-dare quality of Marchand.

Marchand’s Suite proved as playful, as in and out and around the music while seeking how to fill this big empty stage as Heymann’s had, but with a bit more of the sense of a seagull wooing his reluctant cellist hen. Marchand seemed more intent upon wooing us as well, whereas Heymann had kept his eye riven on his private muse.

Both made me listen to Bach as if the music had just been composed for them, afresh.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

AFTERNOON OF A FAUN

It’s a hot sweaty day in a New York studio. A guy is stretching out all those ligaments, waiting for the next rehearsal or class. A freshly showered girl passes by the classroom door and pushes herself through that half-open studio door. Both – and this is such a dancer thing – are obsessed with how they look in the mirror…for better, for worse? When you are a young dancer, boy do you read into that studio mirror: who am I? Maybe I can like what I see? How can I make myself look better?

On the 6th, there was Marchand and here came Amandine Albisson. Albisson almost hissed “look at my shiny, shiny, new pointe shoes!” This may sound weird to say, but that little Joseph Cornell box of a set seemed too small for two such vibrant personas and for the potential of such shiny shoes. Both dancers aimed their movements out of and beyond that box in a never-ending flow of movement that kept catching the waves of Debussy’s sea of sound. The way that Marchand communicated that he could smell her fragrance. The way that fantastically taut and pliant horizontal lift seemed to surf. The way Albisson crisped up her fingers and wiggled them up through his almost embrace as if her arms were sails ready to catch the wind. The way he looked at her – “what, you don’t just exist in the mirror?” – right before he kissed her. It was a dream.

Unfortunately, Léonore Baulac and Germain Louvet do not necessarily a couple make, and the pair delivered a most awkward interpretation on the night of the 13th, complete with wobbly feet and wobbly hands in the partnering and the lifts were mostly so-so sort-of. Baulac danced dry and sharp and overemphatic – almost kicking her extensions – and Louvet just didn’t happen. Rapture and the way that time can stop when you are simply dancing for yourself, not for an audience quite yet, just didn’t happen either. I hope they were both just having an off night?

Afternoon of a Faun : Amandine Albisson et Hugo Marchand

GLASS PIECES

I had the same cast both nights, and I am furious. Who the hell told people – especially the atomic couples – to grin like sailors during the first movement? Believe me, if you smiled on New York’s streets back in 1983, you were either an idiot or a tourist.

But what really fuels my anger: the utter waste of Florian Magnenet in the central duet, dancing magnificently, and pushing his body as if his arms were thrusting through the thick hot humidity of Manhattan summer air. He reached out from deep down in his solar plexus and branched out his arms towards his partner as if to rescue her from an onrushing subway train and…Sae Eun Park placed her hand airlessly in the proper position, as she has for years now. Would some American company please whisk her out of here? She’s cookie-cutter efficient, but I’ll be damned if I would call her elegant. Elegance comes from a deep place. It’s thoughtful and weighty and imparts a rich sense of history and identity. It’s not about just hitting the marks. Elegance comes from the inside out. It cannot be faked from the outside in.

Commentaires fermés sur Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins à Paris : hommage passe et manque…

Je ne sais pas ce qu’il en est pour vous, mais moi, désormais, quand l’intitulé d’un spectacle du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris commence par le mot « Hommage », mon sixième sens commence à s’affoler. On en a trop vu, ces dernières années, d’hommages incomplets ou au rabais pour être tout à fait rassuré. J’aurais aimé que l’hommage à Jerome Robbins, qui aurait eu cent ans cette année, échappe à la fatale règle. Mais non. Cette fois-ci encore, on est face à une soirée « presque, mais pas ». La faute en est à l’idée saugrenue qui a conduit les décideurs à intégrer Fancy Free, le premier succès américain de Robbins, au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris. Car au risque de choquer l’esprit français, incorrigiblement universaliste, il faut reconnaitre qu’il y a des œuvres de valeur qui ne se transposent pas. Elles sont d’une sphère culturelle, parfois même d’une époque, sans être pour autant anecdotique ou datées. C’est le cas pour Fancy Free, ce moment dans la vie de marins de 1944, créé par un Robbins d’à peine 26 ans.

Lors d’une des premières présentations européennes, durant l’été 1946 à Londres, le critique Arnold Haskell notait

« Les [ballets] américains, Fancy Free, Interplay et On Stage, étaient dans un idiome familier aux fans de cinéma mais interprété si superbement par des danseurs de formation classique, qu’ils sont apparus comme quelque chose de nouveau. La vitalité de ces jeunes américains, leur beauté physique a tout emporté. Quelques-uns ont demandé « mais est-ce du ballet ? » […] Bien sûr c’est du ballet ; du ballet américain »

Car plus que la comédie musicale de Broadway (auquel Robbins, de concert avec Leonard Bernstein, ne se frottera en tant que créateur qu’avec On The Town), c’est au cinéma et à Fred Astaire que fait référence Fancy Free. La troisième variation de marin, cette rumba que Jerry Robbins créa pour lui-même, est une référence à peine déguisée à une scène de « You were Never Lovelier », un film de 1942 où le grand Fred partage l’affiche avec Rita Hayworth.

Et c’est sans doute ce qui fait que ce ballet n’est guère aujourd’hui encore appréhendable que par des danseurs américains pour qui le tap dancing est quelque chose d’intégré, quelque chose qu’ils ont très souvent rencontré dès l’école primaire à l’occasion d’un musical de fin d’année. L’esthétique militaire des années de guerre, -une période considérée comme tendue mais heureuse- de même que Fred Astaire ou Rita Hayworth font partie de l’imaginaire collectif américain.

Sur cette série parisienne, on a assisté à des quarts de succès ou à d’authentiques flops. La distribution de la première (vue le 6/11) est hélas plutôt caractérisée par le flop. Tout est faux. Le tap dancing n’est pas inné, les sautillés déséquilibrés sont précautionneux. Surtout, les interactions pantomimes entre les marins manquent totalement de naturel. Au bar, les trois compères portent par deux fois un toast. Messieurs Alu, Paquette et Bullion brandissent tellement violemment leurs pintes que, dans la vie réelle, ils auraient éclaboussé le plafond et n’auraient plus rien eu à boire dans leur bock. Lorsqu’ils se retournent vers le bar, leurs dos arrondis n’expriment rien. On ne sent pas l’alcool qui descend trop vite dans leur estomac. François Alu qui est pourtant le plus près du style et vend sa variation pyrotechnique avec son efficacité coutumière, était rentré dans le bar en remuant plutôt bien des épaules mais en oubliant de remuer du derrière. Karl Paquette manque de naïveté dans sa variation et Stéphane Bullion ne fait que marquer les chaloupés de sa rumba. Les filles sont encore moins dans le style. Là encore, ce sont les dos qui pèchent. Alice Renavand, fille au sac rouge le garde trop droit. Cela lui donne un air maussade pendant toute sa première entrée. La scène du vol du sac par les facétieux marins prend alors une teinte presque glauque. Eleonora Abbagnato, dans son pas de deux avec Karl Paquette, est marmoréenne. Ses ronds de jambe au bras de son partenaire suivis d’un cambré n’entraînent pas le couple dans le mouvement. C’est finalement la fille en bleu (Aurélia Bellet), une apparition tardive, qui retient l’attention et fait sourire.

La seconde distribution réunissant Alessio Carbone, Paul Marque et Alexandre Gasse (vue le 9/11) tire son épingle du jeu. L’énergie des pirouettes et l’interprétation de détail peuvent laisser à désirer (Paris n’est pas le spécialiste du lancer de papier chewing-gum) mais le rapport entre les trois matelots est plus naturel. Surtout, les filles sont plus crédibles. Valentine Colasante, fille au sac rouge, fait savoir très clairement qu’elle goûte les trois marins en goguette ; la scène du vol du sac redevient un charmant badinage. Dorothée Gilbert évoquerait plus la petite femme de Paris qu’une new-yorkaise mais son duo avec Paul Marque dégage ce qu’il faut de sensualité. On ne peut néanmoins s’empêcher de penser qu’il est bizarre, pour ce ballet, de focaliser plus sur les filles que sur les trois garçons.

Voilà une addition au répertoire bien dispensable. Le ballet, qui est en son genre un incontestable chef-d’œuvre mais qui paraît au mieux ici une aimable vieillerie, ne pouvait servir les danseurs. Et c’est pourtant ce que devrait faire toute œuvre rentrant au répertoire. Transposer Fancy Free à Paris, c’était nécessairement condamner les danseurs français à l’imitation et conduire à des comparaisons désavantageuses. Imaginerait-on Carmen de Roland Petit rentrer au répertoire du New York City Ballet ? S’il fallait absolument une entrée au répertoire, peut-être aurait-il fallu se demander quels types d’œuvres le chorégraphe lui-même décidait-il de donner à la compagnie de son vivant : des ballets qui s’enrichiraient d’une certaine manière de leur confrontation avec le style français et qui enrichiraient en retour les interprètes parisiens. Et s’il fallait un ballet « Broadway » au répertoire du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris, pourquoi ne pas avoir choisi Interplay ? La scène en ombre chinoise du deuxième mouvement aurait été une jolie préfiguration du mouvement central de Glass Pieces et les danseurs maison auraient pu travailler la prestesse américaine et les accents jazzy sans grever le budget avec la fabrication de coûteux décors…

*

 *                                       *

La partie centrale du spectacle, séparée par un entracte, est constitué de deux valeurs sûres régulièrement présentée par le ballet de l’Opéra. A Suite of Dances, entré au répertoire après la mort du grand Jerry avec Manuel Legris comme interprète, est un riche vecteur pour de grands interprètes, beaucoup moins pour des danseurs moins inspirés. Dans ce dernier cas, le côté œuvre d’occasion créée sur les qualités de son créateur – Mikhaïl Baryshnikov – peut malheureusement ressortir. Cette regrettable éventualité nous aura fort heureusement été épargnée. Aussi bien Mathias Heymann qu’Hugo Marchand, qui gomment l’aspect cabotin de l’interprète original, ont quelque chose de personnel à faire passer dans leur dialogue avec la violoncelliste Sonia Wieder-Atherton. Heymann (le 6/11) est indéniablement élégant mais surtout absolument dionysiaque. Il y a quelque chose du Faune ou de l’animal dans la façon dont il caresse le sol avec ses pieds dans les petites cloches durant la première section. Son mouvement ne s’arrête que lorsque l’instrument a fini de sonner. Pendant le troisième mouvement, réflexif, il semble humer la musique et on peut littéralement la voir s’infuser dans le corps de l’animal dansant que devient Mathias Heymann.  L’instrumentiste, presque trop concentrée sur son violoncelle ne répond peut-être pas assez aux appels pleins de charme du danseur. Avec Hugo Marchand, on est dans un tout autre registre. Élégiaque dans le mouvement lent, mais plein de verve (magnifié par une batterie cristalline) sur le 2e mouvement rapide, Hugo Marchand reste avant tout un danseur. Il interrompt une série de facéties chorégraphiques par un très beau piqué arabesque agrémenté d’un noble port de bras. À l’inverse d’Heymann, son mouvement s’arrête mais cela n’a rien de statique. L’interprète semble suspendu à l’écoute de la musique. Cette approche va mieux à Sonia Wieder-Atherton. On se retrouve face à deux instrumentistes qui confrontent leur art et testent les limites de leur instrument respectif.

 *                               *

Dans Afternoon of a Faun, le jeune danseur étoile avait été moins à l’unisson de sa partenaire (le 6). Hugo Marchand dansait la subtile relecture du Faune de Nijinsky aux côtés d’Amandine Albisson. Les deux danseurs montrent pourtant de fort belles choses. Lui, est admirable d’intériorité durant toute la première section, absorbé dans un profond exercice de proprioception. Amandine Albisson est ce qu’il faut belle et mystérieuse. Ses développés à la barre sont d’une indéniable perfection formelle. Mais les deux danseurs semblent hésiter sur l’histoire qu’ils veulent raconter. Ils reviennent trop souvent, comme à rebours, vers le miroir et restent tous deux sur le même plan. Ni l’un ni l’autre ne prend la main, et ne transmue donc la répétition de danse en une entreprise de séduction. L’impression est toute autre pendant la soirée du 9 novembre. Audric Bezard, à la beauté plastique époustouflante, est narcissique à souhait devant le miroir. Il ajuste sa ceinture avec un contentement visible. Lorsque Myriam Ould-Braham entre dans le studio , il est évident qu’il veut la séduire et qu’il pense réussir sans peine. Mais, apparemment absente, la danseuse s’impose en maîtresse du jeu. On voit au fur et à mesure le jeune danseur se mettre au diapason du lyrisme de sa partenaire. Le baiser final n’est pas tant un charme rompu qu’une sorte de sort jeté. Myriam Ould-Braham devient presque brumeuse. Elle disparaît plutôt qu’elle ne sort du studio. Le danseur aurait-il rêvé sa partenaire idéale?

*

 *                                       *

Le ballet qui clôturait l’Hommage 2018 à Jerome Robbins avait sans doute pour certains balletomanes l’attrait de la nouveauté. Glass Pieces n’avait pas été donné depuis la saison 2004-2005, où il était revenu d’ailleurs après dix ans d’éclipse. En cela, le ballet de Robbins est emblématique de la façon dont le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris traite – ou maltraite plutôt – son répertoire. Entré en novembre 1991, il avait été repris, du vivant de Robbins, en 1994 puis en 1995. Pour tout dire, on attendait plutôt un autre retour, celui de The Four Seasons, le dernier cadeau de Robbins au ballet de l’Opéra en 1996. Cette œuvre, dont les soli féminins sont constamment présentés par les artistes du corps de ballet lors du concours de promotion, aurait eu l’avantage d’utiliser dans un idiome plus classique le corps de ballet et aurait permis de multiples possibilités de distribution solistes et demi-solistes. Il n’en a pas été décidé ainsi. Glass Pieces, qui est en son genre un chef-d’œuvre avec son utilisation quasi graphique des danseurs évoluant sur fond de quadrillage tantôt comme des clusters, tantôt comme une délicate frise antique ou enfin tels des volutes tribales, n’a pas été nécessairement bien servi cette saison. Durant le premier mouvement, on se demande qui a bien pu dire aux trois couples de demi-solistes de sourire comme s’ils étaient des ados pré-pubères invités à une fête d’anniversaire. Plus grave encore, le mouvement central a été, les deux soirs où j’ai vu le programme, dévolu à Sae Eun Park. La danseuse, aux côtés de Florent Magnenet, ravale la chorégraphie « statuaire » de Robbins, où les quelques instants d’immobilité doivent avoir autant de valeur que les sections de danse pure, à une succession de minauderies néoclassiques sans signification. Les deux premières incarnations du rôle, Marie-Claude Pietragalla et Elisabeth Platel, vous faisaient passer une après-midi au Met Museum. L’une, accompagnée de Kader Belarbi, avait l’angularité d’un bas relief égyptien, l’autre, aux bras de Wilfried Romoli, évoquait les parois d’un temple assyrien sur laquelle serait sculptée une chasse aux lions. Comme tout cela semble loin…

La prochaine fois que la direction du ballet de l’Opéra voudra saluer un grand chorégraphe disparu qui a compté dans son Histoire, je lui conseille de troquer le mot « hommage » pour celui de « célébration ». En mettant la barre plus haut, elle parviendra, peut être, à se hisser à la hauteur d’une part de l’artiste qu’elle prétend honorer et d’autre part à de la belle et riche génération de jeunes danseurs dont elle est dotée aujourd’hui.

Interplay. 1946. Photographie Baron. Haskell écrivait : « C’est une interprétation dansée de la musique, un remarquable chef d’oeuvre d’artisanat où le classicisme rencontre l’idiome moderne, nous procurant de la beauté, de l’esprit, de la satire, de l’humour et une pincée de vulgarité ».

 

3 Commentaires

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins: hommage demi-portion

Hommage à Jerome Robbins, Opéra de Paris, 30 octobre et 2 novembre 

Le fantôme de Millepied hanterait-il l’Opéra de Paris ?  La soirée « Hommage à Jerome Robbins » lorgne délibérément vers New York. Délaissant En Sol, In the Night et Dances at a Gathering, présentées deux ou trois fois à Garnier ces quinze dernières années, mais oubliant aussi The Four Seasons (pièce dansée lors de la saison 1995-1996, et plus jamais depuis) ou le silencieux Moves, la programmation marque l’entrée au répertoire de Fancy Free (1944), création inaugurale de Robbins.

En voilà une fausse bonne idée. Les petits malins de la direction de la danse ont peut-être pensé faire d’une pierre deux coups, avec un discret clin d’œil au centenaire de Leonard Bernstein, mais Garnier n’est pas Broadway, et l’Opéra de Paris n’est pas le NYCB. Incarnés par Alessio Carbone, Paul Marque et Alexandre Gasse, les trois marins en goguette à Manhattan sont précis et musicaux ; ils ont manifestement potassé mimiques et pantomime (et côté filles, Valentine Colasante nous sert aussi toutes les mines qu’il faut en danseuse au sac rouge), mais ça fait un peu plaqué. Question de style. Lors de la séquence « dance off », chacun se coule dans son moule – Carbone est ostentatoire, Marque glissé et Gasse chaloupé –, mais ça reste élégant et trop contrôlé (30 octobre et 2 novembre). J’ai encore en mémoire la prestation jubilatoire des danseurs de l’ABT en 2007 au Châtelet ; ils avaient l’air d’exploser de vitalité. Et il suffit de regarder quelques secondes Baryschnikov dans la variation du « 2nd sailor »  pour voir ce qui fait défaut à nos jolis danseurs parisiens (la prise de risque dans les glissés, le feint déséquilibre dû à l’ivresse, la niaise juvénilité).

Quand je serai dictateur, Aurélie Dupont devra me rendre raison du sous-emploi à quoi elle a réduit Dorothée Gilbert en ce début de saison. La donzelle sait tout faire, y compris un rôle à talons, mais le pas de deux avec Paul Marque manque totalement de sensualité (a contrario, voir la tension entre les deux danseurs du NYCB dans un court extrait de répétition).

La soirée continue avec Suites of Dances, où François Alu étonne. Ce danseur a l’art de raconter des histoires, et il nous en donne par poignées. On a l’impression d’un livre ouvert : tout est lisible, finement accentué. Épaulements, sautes d’humeur, nonchalance et espièglerie, bras expressifs et mains libérées. Alu a peut-être un peu moins d’affinité avec le troisième mouvement, d’essence nocturne, mais la maturité de l’interprète éclate (30 octobre). Dans le même rôle, Paul Marque a une danse très fluide (Alu donne l’impression de découper l’air, Marque de s’y couler), encore un peu scolaire (on voit un danseur plus qu’un personnage), tout en emportant le morceau dans l’accélération finale (2 novembre).

Après l’entracte, Afternoon of a faun réunit Mathias Heymann, très félin, et Myriam Ould-Braham, apparition aux lignes de rêve (30 octobre). Germain Louvet et Léonore Baulac, aux lignes également idéales, sont davantage humains qu’animaux (2 novembre). Dans Glass Pieces, seule pièce à effectif de la soirée (cherchez l’erreur!), on est emporté par la classe des trois couples du premier mouvement (Charline Giezendanner et Simon Valastro, Caroline Robert et Allister Madin, Séverine Westermann et Sébastien Bertaud, 2 novembre). Avec Laura Hecquet et Stéphane Bullion, l’adage semble manquer de tension, et – l’avouerai-je ? – le tambour du dernier mouvement me tape sur le système.

4 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, retrouvailles et découverte

Other Dances. MiamiCityBallet. Reinan Cerdeiro et Simone Messmer. Photo © Alexander Iziliaev

Les Etés de la Danse 2018. La Seine musicale. Hommage à Jerome Robbins. Programme 2. Miami City Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Ballet de Perm. jeudi 28 juin 2018.

 *                          *

*

Retour à la Seine musicale pour la suite de l’hommage à Jerome Robbins et pour des retrouvailles.

En 2011, les Étés de la Danse avait sans doute atteint leur acmé en prenant Paris par surprise avec une compagnie d’outre-Atlantique, le Miami City Ballet, dirigée alors par son fondateur, le légendaire Edward Villela, créateur de nombreux chefs-d’œuvre de Balanchine (tel Rubies) et de Jerome Robbins (en tout premier lieu le danseur en brun de Dances At A Gathering). Le style direct, sans affectation, des danseurs de Miami redonnait à l’œuvre de Balanchine toute sa fraîcheur. Rendez-vous semblait déjà pris dans un proche futur pour un retour dans la capitale. Mais au retour en Floride, le grand Eddie n’avait pas tardé à être brusquement remercié par un board of trustees qui, entre autres, lui reprochait le gouffre financier qu’avait représenté le déplacement de la compagnie entière pour trois semaines en Europe. Exit Vilella et avec lui de la directrice fondatrice de l’école, son épouse. Bonjour, Lourdes Lopez, une très estimée ex-principal de New York City Ballet.

Le retour, très tardif, de Miami se fait sur une base modeste : pas de corps de ballet et seulement trois jours de présence mais les deux des pièces les plus emblématiques du chorégraphe pour cette soirée. On était à la fois impatient et inquiet du résultat.

In The Night, bien connu du public parisien (c’est l’un des piliers du répertoire depuis 1989), était dansé avec un parti-pris à la fois déroutant et intéressant. Dès le premier pas de deux, il faut oublier l’osmose du couple, les « créatures nocturnes » pour un rapport plus binaire, masculin-féminin, qui conduit lentement mais sûrement vers l’antagonisme. Dans ce In The Night, les hommes sont comme aux prises avec les femmes. Ouvrant la danse, le sculptural Jovani Furlan (qui venait juste d’entrer dans le corps de ballet en 2011 et a été depuis promu principal) semble regarder sa partenaire Emily Bromberg, au mouvement voluptueux, comme une créature rêvée qui lui échappe sans cesse. Pour le couple mûr, Rainer Krenstetter, très élégant, déploie une déférence à la limite de la défiance envers sa partenaire, la minérale Tricia Alberston. Ce pas de deux est annonciateur de la tempête de récriminations qui caractérise le troisième couple. On y retrouve avec plaisir Renato Penteado, l’un de nos favoris des Étés 2011, tout souffrance face à l’impétueuse Katia Karranza. On goûte, comme il y a sept ans, la façon dont les danseurs de Miami poussent le geste dansé jusqu’aux abords de la pantomime sans jamais y verser complètement. Dans le quatrième mouvement, celui des chassés croisés et de l’apaisement, Penteado et Carranza déploient des trésors de tendresse avec le buste et les mains. Les hommes trouveraient-ils donc la clé des femmes sur le tard ?

L’autre pièce défendue par Miami terminait la longue première partie de la soirée (un petit film, des discours et remerciements et trois ballets enchaînés). Il s’agissait ni plus ni moins d’Other Dances créé jadis en 1976 pour Natalia Makarova et Mikhaïl Baryshnikov. Dans ce badinage poétique entre un couple et un pianiste (Francisco Rennó, le répétiteur de la compagnie, qui accompagnait déjà In The Night en 2011), on retrouve Renan Cerdeiro, jeune espoir de la compagnie à l’époque (il était soliste), qui s’est mué en un principal de tout premier plan. Un peu brindille il y a sept ans, il étonnait déjà par sa sûreté technique et par la précision de son partenariat. Aujourd’hui, ayant gagné en muscle tout en restant filiforme, il a développé une crâne assurance mais a gardé cette simplicité de présentation de la danse qui faisait son charme alors. Racé, élégant, montant les directions du mouvement par des ports de bras onctueux et des épaulements précis, il conquiert la salle lors de sa première variation. Les pirouettes sont sûres, les pertes de direction feintes (un gag très apprécié par Baryshnikov) très intelligemment négociées. Il domine les accélérations et ralentis requis par Robbins. Sans avoir la flexibilité de la créatrice du rôle, Simone Messmer (une ex-soliste d’ABT passée par San Francisco; elle était aux Étés de la Danse 2014), sa partenaire, a un joli phrasé de la danse. Les deux danseurs développent de surcroît un vrai dialogue complice et conversent naturellement avec le pianiste. Un plaisir.

Other Dances. MiamiCityBallet. Reinan Cerdeiro. Photo © Alexander Iziliaev

Le reste de la soirée réservait son lot de découvertes et de surprises : Le ballet Opus 19/The Dreamer, sur les accents mystérieux du concerto pour violon n°1 en ré majeur de Prokofiev interprété par le Pacific Northwest Ballet dirigé par Peter Boal, un autre ex-superlatif danseur du New York City Ballet. Dans cette pièce pour deux solistes et cinq couples, le garçon central est aux prises avec une muse rétive. Le corps de ballet pourrait aussi bien représenter des nuées dans un ciel d’été plus ou moins chargé ou des « humeurs » changeantes. D’ailleurs, les incursions furtives et souvent volontairement brutales des pas du folklore russe dans le canevas de pas classique ne sont pas sans évoquer les mouvements Mélancolique et Flegmatique des Quatre tempéraments de Balanchine (sauts sur pointe genoux pliés, effondrement de découragement). Dans le rôle principal masculin, on découvre un très beau danseur blond, à la peau laiteuse, doté de jolies lignes et d’un mélange de force et d’abandon. Dylan Wald n’est pourtant encore que danseur du corps de ballet. Sa partenaire, Sarah Ricard Orza, principal, danse la muse avec plus d’autorité et de force que de charme.

Pacific Northwest Ballet. Opus19/The Dreamer. Photo by Angela Sterling

Après un long entracte, la soirée se terminait par un bonbon acidulé de farce et attrapes. Derrière son côté incontestablement classique, Four Seasons de Robbins est une caricature mordante aussi bien des ballets d’Opéra du XIXe siècle (ici, il réutilise celui des Vêpres siciliennes de Verdi) que de la grande tradition de la danse soviétique des années 1950-1960. La section de l’automne tout particulièrement fait référence au ballet de Faust, la Nuit de Walpurgis, chorégraphié par Lavrosky, avec bacchantes lascives et faune sur-vitaminé.

L‘interprétation doit être sur le fil. Il y a dans Four Seasons des moments de pure virtuosité pour les solistes qui peuvent faire passer l’humour à l’arrière-plan. Le second degré est donc requis.

Il n’est donc pas certains qu’il soit judicieux de donner à danser une parodie de la danse russe à des Russes, peu habitués à porter un regard distancié sur leur tradition. Le ballet de Perm est une bonne compagnie. Son école fournit de nombreux solistes dans diverses troupes européennes. Cependant, à l’heure actuelle et à l’inverse du Joffrey Ballet, les garçons en seraient plutôt le maillon faible.

Les deux Borées du pas de trois de l’hiver manquent d’incisif dans un passage joué de toute façon trop lentement. Le soliste du printemps, Kiril Makourine, malgré d’indéniables qualités, est plus vert que son costume (et il a à lutter avec nos souvenirs de Manuel Legris dans le même rôle). Celui de l’été a le pied mou. Même la star de la compagnie, Nikita Chetverikov, très beau danseur noble, nous semble un peu précautionneux dans ses variations de l’automne. Taras Tovstyuk, faune très à l’aise techniquement, semble penser que sa perruque ébouriffée tient lieu de second degré.

Les filles sont plus à l’aise. Polina Bouldakova (l’automne) décoche ses insolentes arabesques avec gourmandise et Inna Bilash (le printemps), qu’on avait peu goûté il y a dix ans, s’est muée en une danseuse moelleuse et élégante qui prend le temps de s’amuser avec sa partition.

Sans doute une pièce comique plus éloignée de la tradition russe aurait mieux convenu au ballet de Perm. Fanfare n’aurait sans doute pas été un mauvais choix. Mais tel qu’il se présentait ici, cette compagnie nous a donné envie de revoir Four Seasons.

Que le Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris ne reprenne pas cette pièce à corps de ballet avec multiples variations solistes -régulièrement choisies par les danseurs au concours de promotion-  pour son hommage à Robbins en octobre reste décidément une décision sidérante d’aveuglement.

Commentaires fermés sur Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, retrouvailles et découverte

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), Ici Paris

Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, un hommage panoramique

Jerome Robbins. photography © Paul Kolnik. Courtesy of Les Etés de la Danse.

Les Etés de la Danse. Hommage à Jerome Robbins, programme 1. New York City Ballet et Joffrey Ballet. Lundi 25 juin 2018 à la Seine musicale.

Voilà déjà la quatorzième édition des étés de la danse ! Cette année, le festival est encore délocalisé à la Seine musicale, une salle difficilement accessible. À la sortie du métropolitain, à l’extrême bout ouest de la ligne 9, le gros œuf en proue de l’Île Seguin semble tout proche. Il vous faut pourtant contourner tout un pâté d’immeubles et une passerelle par-dessus le fleuve pour enfin arriver au théâtre. La salle elle-même n’est pas spécialement adaptée à la danse. Depuis les places de balcon, la scène ressemble à une petite boîte dans une boîte. On se console en se disant qu’on s’est rendu ici pour assister à un programme américain et qu’à New York, on ne verrait guère mieux du haut du Fourth Ring de l’ex-State Theater ou encore du Met.

Au vu des nombreuses promotions qui ont couru sur internet, la feuille de location est un peu tristounette. C’est injuste. En dépit de l’éloignement de la salle et d’affiches publicitaires particulièrement moches (Les Étés de la Danse nous avaient habitués à beaucoup mieux), la programmation du festival est vraiment alléchante. Elle combine cette année un hommage à Jerome Robbins, qui aurait eu cent ans cette année, et la venue de pas moins de cinq compagnies connues ou moins connues du public parisien.

Le programme 1, qui réunissait le New York City Ballet et la Joffrey Ballet est de surcroît fort bien construit. Il rassemble en un panorama très complet cinq décennies de création du grand Jerry, alternativement Ballet man et Broadway man. La présentation -non chronologique- des pièces offrait une bonne respiration au public : d’abord invité à une heure suspendue sur la musique de Chopin (Dances at a Gathering, la décennie des 70), puis, après l’entracte, titillé par les accents jazzy de Morton Gould (Interplay, la décennie des années 50-60, où le chorégraphe se partage entre la création d’un répertoire de ballets américains et les musicals) avant de retourner à Bach (Suite of Dances, créé à l’orée des années 90 pour un Mikhaïl Baryshnikov en quête d’un renouveau de son répertoire). La soirée se terminait par le très roboratif Glass Pieces, réflexion du chorégraphe vieillissant sur les possibilités expressives de la danse classique sur des partitions d’abord utilisées par des chorégraphes contemporains (le ballet de 1983 intervient après la célèbre production d’Einstein on the Beach, l’opéra dansé du compositeur).

*

 *                                                                              *

L’interprétation de ces pièces par les deux compagnies invitées réserve son lot de découvertes, de bonnes surprises, mais aussi de déceptions.

«Dances At A Gathering» a été créé pour le New York City Ballet en 1969. Il est entré au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris en 1991 dans une version légèrement altérée par le chorégraphe. Dans la version d’origine la danseuse en mauve, qui n’apparaît qu’après le premier tiers du ballet à Paris, danse le pas de deux avec le danseur vert dévolu à la danseuse en jaune à Paris (abricot à New York). Cette simple translation de pas change l’alchimie entre les danseurs : le couple mauve-vert semble plus fixe que dans la version parisienne où le garçon semble plus volage et où les possibilités d’intrigues entre les protagonistes de cette assemblée d’un après-midi d’été sont plus nombreuses.

C’est hélas Sara Mearns qui occupe le rôle « augmenté » de la danseuse mauve. L’interprète semble avoir un statut tout à fait privilégié dans sa compagnie d’origine. Les photographies fournies par le New York City Ballet pour Dances At A Gathering vous la proposent sur tous les clichés, en danseuse mauve mais aussi en abricot… Est-ce pour cela que son interprétation des pas de la ballerine parme apparaît si interchangeable ? Gros chignon, pieds particulièrement bruyants sur la première entrée, bras et jambes qui font flip flap dans toutes les directions autour d’un buste d’airain, elle n’apporte aucune psychologie à son personnage ni aucune interaction autre que physique avec ses partenaires.

Tiler Peck, en rose, ne convainc guère plus en dépit de qualités plus immédiatement discernables. Sa danse est efficace et son phrasé parfois intéressant. Mais il manque à son personnage cette évanescence de pétale frais qu’on attend de ce rôle. Du coup, les passages dramatiques semblent être sur le même plan que les interactions romantiques. Le dernier pas de deux avec le danseur violet – l’élégant et véloce Tyler Angle, excellent partenaire – manque de sentiment élégiaque et, par ricochet, de drame.

Avec deux trous pareils dans la distribution (et le danseur vert de Chase Finlay, tolérable mais fade), on n’échappe pas à quelques longueurs. Néanmoins, on goûte le duo du danseur en brique (Joseph Gordon) avec la danseuse en abricot (Lauren Lovette) : un moment de danse pizzicati sans le traditionnel staccato trop souvent observé aujourd’hui au New York City Ballet. Elle a de très jolis bras et une vitesse qui ne verse jamais dans la précipitation. Lui déploie une prestesse qui n’est pas exempte de moelleux. Maria Kowroski, en vert amande, liane élégante, danse délicieusement entre les tempi : c’est tout chic et charme. Il me manquera certes toujours les moulinets de poignets de Claude de Vulpian à la fin du badinage avec les danseurs violet, vert et brique mais la ballerine s’en sort avec les honneurs. La salle rit.

Et puis il y a la présence solaire de Joaquin De Luz dans le danseur en brun, aux antipodes de l’interprétation parisienne du rôle. Ici, pas de poète en recherche de muse. Concentré d’énergie explosive, il évoque immanquablement Edward Vilella, créateur du rôle. Petit gabarit (parfois même un peu trop pour ses partenaires féminines : on regrette l’absence de Megan Fairchild avec laquelle il s’accorde si bien), il joue la mouche du coche dans son savoureux duo de rivalité avec Tyler Angle. Sa variation finale est proprement jubilatoire. Soignant à l’extrême les pliés de réception de sauts, il met du coup en valeur l’envol et prend le temps de montrer les directions par des épaulements exaltés mais précis. Rien que pour lui, on ne regrette pas le périple qui nous a conduit sur l’île Seguin.

NewYorkCityBallet-Dances At A Gathering02-Photo © Paul Kolnik

« Interplay », est le ballet idéal pour approcher Jerome Robbins, « the broadway man ». Conçu pour des danseurs classiques en 1945, il utilise la technique académique avec de petits twists sans pour autant verser dans la couleur locale de « Fancy Free » ou nécessiter que les danseurs sachent chanter comme dans « West Side Story Suite » : pieds ancrés dans le sol et marches en crabe mais pyrotechnie à tout va caractérisent la pièce. Les garçons font même des roulades soleil pour épater les filles dans le quatrième mouvement. On se prend à s’étonner que les danseurs portent chaussons et pointes quand on les imaginait porter des baskets. La musique de Morton Gould, tour à tour rythmique et primesautière, ferait bondir un mort de sa bière.

Le Joffrey Ballet, peu connu chez nous, déploie la bonne énergie dans cette pièce rarement montrée à Paris. Les quatre garçons retiennent particulièrement l’attention. Le premier mouvement est mené avec beaucoup d’énergie par Elivelton Tomazi (en vert). Yoshihisa Arai (en rouge) incendie le deuxième mouvement de sa belle ligne, de sa grande élévation et de ses petits frappés de mains presque baroques. Pendant le Pas de deux, le reste de la distribution prend des poses sensuelles en ombre chinoise. Une sensualité qui manque un peu au pas de deux lui-même. Le danseur en bleu, Alberto Velasquez déploie ce qu’il faut de mâle assurance mais sa partenaire en rose, Christine Rocas, semble un peu étrangère a l’action.

« Suite of Dances », sur des pièces pour violoncelle de Bach, qui succède à Interplay, en est finalement moins éloigné qu’on serait tenté de le penser de prime abord. On retrouve ce génie de Robbins pour la greffe de détails extérieurs à la tradition académique qui lui donnent une nouvelle vitalité. Ici, il ne s’agit pas de mouvements empruntés au jazz (Interplay) ou aux danses nationales polonaises (Dances) mais des tics de cabotinage d’un grand danseur (marche avec les hanches en-avant, petits tours jambes repliées, jeu sur les pertes de direction, etc…). Cette partition, taillée sur mesure pour Baryshnikov a néanmoins continué d’être interprété quand son créateur n’a lui-même plus été en mesure de l’interpréter. Anthony Huxley, nouvelle incarnation du danseur au pyjama rouge, est moelleux, musical et élégant. Il installe un dialogue avec sa partenaire instrumentiste. Mais il lui manque le fond de cabotinage qui met en valeur les incongruités de la chorégraphie. On assiste à un récital de – belles – danses savantes sans jamais vraiment atteindre un quelconque Nirvana. On aurait aimé voir Anthony Huxley dans le danseur en brique ou en brun de Dances at a Gathering. Et que d’inventions comiques aurait apporté Joaquim de Luz dans « Suite »… C’était hélas pour la seconde distribution…

Pour « Glass Pieces » qui concluait la soirée, on dresse le même constat que pour Interplay. Au Joffrey, les garçons sont globalement plus palpitants que les filles. Le premier mouvement sur le quadrillage en cyclo de fond a un côté plus humain et moins graphique qu’à Paris. Pourquoi pas : l’effet est moins cluster d’écran vidéo et plus piétons des rues. Dans le deuxième mouvement avec sa frise de filles en ombre chinoise (Robbins savait renouveler des effets qu’il avait déjà utilisés ailleurs), Miguel Angel Bianco est ce qu’il faut de sculptural pour figurer un haut relief de chair, mais aucune sensualité ne se dégage de son duo avec sa partenaire Jeraldine Mendoza. Pour le final, l’entrée des garçons est galvanisante. Il s’en dégage une énergique presque tribale. Mais ça s’essouffle avec l’entrée des filles en guirlande sur le thème de flûte. Dommage…

GlassPieces-JoffreyBallet-CompanyDancers–Photo © Cheryl Mann

Mais ne boudons néanmoins pas notre plaisir. Ce n’est pas souvent qu’à Paris, on assiste à un hommage aussi bien construit et complet.

[Le programme 2 de l’hommage à Robbins joue du jeudi 28 au samedi 30 juin à la Seine Musicale]

Commentaires fermés sur Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, un hommage panoramique

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), Ici Paris