Archives de Tag: Herman Shmerman

Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

The extended apron thrust forward across where the orchestra should have been gave many seats at the Palais Garnier – already not renowned for visibility — scant sightlines unless you were in a last row and could stand up and tilt forward. Were these two “it’s a gala/not a gala” programs worth attending? Yes and/or no.

Evening  Number One: “Nureyev” on Thursday, October 8, at the Palais Garnier.

Nureyev’s re-thinkings of the relationship between male and female dancers always seek to tweak the format of the male partner up and out from glorified crane operator into that of race car driver. But that foot on the gas was always revved up by a strong narrative context.

Nutcracker pas de deux Acts One and Two

Gilbert generously offers everything to a partner and the audience, from her agile eyes through her ever-in-motion and vibrantly tensile body. A street dancer would say “the girlfriend just kills it.” Her boyfriend for this series, Paul Marque, first needs to learn how to live.

At the apex of the Act II pas of Nuts, Nureyev inserts a fiendishly complex and accelerating airborne figure that twice ends in a fish dive, of course timed to heighten a typically overboard Tchaikovsky crescendo. Try to imagine this: the stunt driver is basically trying to keep hold of the wheel of a Lamborghini with a mind of its own that suddenly goes from 0 to 100, has decided to flip while doing a U-turn, and expects to land safe and sound and camera-ready in the branches of that tree just dangling over the cliff.  This must, of course, be meticulously rehearsed even more than usual, as it can become a real hot mess with arms, legs, necks, and tutu all in getting in the way.  But it’s so worth the risk and, even when a couple messes up, this thing can give you “wow” shivers of delight and relief. After “a-one-a-two-a-three,” Marque twice parked Gilbert’s race car as if she were a vintage Trabant. Seriously: the combination became unwieldy and dull.

Marque continues to present everything so carefully and so nicely: he just hasn’t shaken off that “I was the best student in the class “ vibe. But where is the urge to rev up?  Smiling nicely just doesn’t do it, nor does merely getting a partner around from left to right. He needs to work on developing a more authoritative stage presence, or at least a less impersonal one.

 

Cendrillon

A ballerina radiating just as much oomph and chic and and warmth as Dorothée Gilbert, Alice Renavand grooved and spun wheelies just like the glowing Hollywood starlet of Nureyev’s cinematic imagination.  If Renavand “owned” the stage, it was also because she was perfectly in synch with a carefree and confident Florian Magnenet, so in the moment that he managed to make you forget those horrible gold lamé pants.

 

Swan Lake, Act 1

Gently furling his ductile fingers in order to clasp the wrists of the rare bird that continued to astonish him, Audric Bezard also (once again) demonstrated that partnering can be so much more than “just stand around and be ready to lift the ballerina into position, OK?” Here we had what a pas is supposed to be about: a dialogue so intense that it transcends metaphor.

You always feel the synergy between Bezard and Amandine Albisson. Twice she threw herself into the overhead lift that resembles a back-flip caught mid-flight. Bezard knows that this partner never “strikes a pose” but instead fills out the legato, always continuing to extend some part her movements beyond the last drop of a phrase. His choice to keep her in movement up there, her front leg dangerously tilting further and further over by miniscule degrees, transformed this lift – too often a “hoist and hold” more suited to pairs skating – into a poetic and sincere image of utter abandon and trust. The audience held its breath for the right reason.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Manfred

Bewildered, the audience nevertheless applauded wildly at the end of this agonized and out of context solo. Pretending to themselves they had understood, the audience just went with the flow of the seasoned dancer-actor. Mathias Heymann gave the moment its full dose of “ah me” angst and defied the limits of the little apron stage [these are people used to eating up space the size of a football field].

Pas de deux can mostly easily be pulled out of context and presented as is, since the theme generally gravitates from “we two are now falling in love,” and “yes, we are still in love,” to “hey, guys, welcome to our wedding!” But I have doubts about the point of plunging both actor and audience into an excerpt that lacks a shared back-story. Maybe you could ask Juliet to do the death scene a capella. Who doesn’t know the “why” of that one? But have most of us ever actually read Lord Byron, much less ever heard of this Manfred? The program notes that the hero is about to be reunited by Death [spelled with a capital “D”] with his beloved Astarté. Good to know.

Don Q

Francesco Mura somehow manages to bounce and spring from a tiny unforced plié, as if he just changed his mind about where to go. But sometimes the small preparation serves him less well. Valentine Colasante is now in a happy and confident mind-set, having learned to trust her body. She now relaxes into all the curves with unforced charm and easy wit.

R & J versus Sleeping Beauty’s Act III

In the Balcony Scene with Miriam Ould-Braham, Germain Louvet’s still boyish persona perfectly suited his Juliet’s relaxed and radiant girlishness. But then, when confronted by Léonore Baulac’s  Beauty, Louvet once again began to seem too young and coltish. It must hard make a connection with a ballerina who persists in exteriorizing, in offering up sharply-outlined girliness. You can grin hard, or you can simply smile.  Nothing is at all wrong with Baulac’s steely technique. If she could just trust herself enough to let a little bit of the air out of her tires…She drives fast but never stops to take a look at the landscape.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

As the Beatles once sang a very, very, long time ago:

 « Baby, you can drive my car
Yes, I’m gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I’ll love you »

Evening Two: “Etoiles.”  Tuesday, October 13, 2020.

We were enticed back to the Palais Garnier for a thing called “Etoiles {Stars] de l’Opera,” where the program consisted of…anything and everything in a very random way.  (Plus a bit of live music!)

Clair de lune by Alistair Marriott (2017) was announced in the program as a nice new thing. Nice live Debussy happened, because the house pianist Elena Bonnay, just like the best of dancers, makes all music fill out an otherwise empty space.

Mathieu Ganio, sporting a very pretty maxi-skort, opened his arms sculpturally, did a few perfect plies à la seconde, and proffered up a few light contractions. At the end, all I could think of was Greta Garbo’s reaction to her first kiss in the film Ninochka: “That was…restful.”  Therefore:

Trois Gnossiennes, by Hans van Manen and way back from 1982, seemed less dated by comparison.  The same plié à la seconde, a few innie contractions, a flexed foot timed to a piano chord for no reason whatever, again. Same old, eh? Oddly, though, van Manen’s pure and pensive duet suited  Ludmila Paglerio and Hugo Marchand as  prettily as Marriott’s had for Ganio. While Satie’s music breathes at the same spaced-out rhythm as Debussy’s, it remains more ticklish. Noodling around in an  absinth-colored but lucid haze, this oddball composer also knew where he was going. I thought of this restrained little pas de deux as perhaps “Balanchine’s Apollo checks out a fourth muse.”  Euterpe would be my choice. But why not Urania?

And why wasn’t a bit of Kylian included in this program? After all, Kylain has historically been vastly more represented in the Paris Opera Ballet’s repertoire than van Manen will ever be.

The last time I saw Martha Graham’s Lamentation, Miriam Kamionka — parked into a side corridor of the Palais Garnier — was really doing it deep and then doing it over and over again unto exhaustion during  yet another one of those Boris Charmatz events. Before that stunt, maybe I had seen the solo performed here by Fanny Gaida during the ‘90’s. When Sae-Un Park, utterly lacking any connection to her solar plexus, had finished demonstrating how hard it is to pull just one tissue out of a Kleenex box while pretending it matters, the audience around me couldn’t even tell when it was over and waited politely for the lights to go off  and hence applaud. This took 3.5 minutes from start to end, according to the program.

Then came the duet from William Forsythe’s Herman Schmerman, another thingy that maybe also had entered into the repertoire around 2017. Again: why this one, when so many juicy Forsythes already belong to us in Paris? At first I did not remember that this particular Forsythe invention was in fact a delicious parody of “Agon.” It took time for Hannah O’Neill to get revved up and to finally start pushing back against Vincent Chaillet. Ah, Vincent Chaillet, forceful, weightier, and much more cheerfully nasty and all-out than I’d seen him for quite a while, relaxed into every combination with wry humor and real groundedness. He kept teasing O’Neill: who is leading, eh? Eh?! Yo! Yow! Get on up, girl!

I think that for many of us, the brilliant Ida Nevasayneva of the Trocks (or another Trock! Peace be with you, gals) kinda killed being ever to watch La Mort du cygne/Dying Swan without desperately wanting to giggle at even the idea of a costume decked with feathers or that inevitable flappy arm stuff. Despite my firm desire to resist, Ludmila Pagliero’s soft, distilled, un-hysterical and deeply dignified interpretation reconciled me to this usually overcooked solo.  No gymnastic rippling arms à la Plisetskaya, no tedious Russian soul à la Ulanova.  Here we finally saw a really quietly sad, therefore gut-wrenching, Lamentation. Pagliero’s approach helped me understand just how carefully Michael Fokine had listened to our human need for the aching sound of a cello [Ophélie Gaillard, yes!] or a viola, or a harp  — a penchant that Saint-Saens had shared with Tchaikovsky. How perfectly – if done simply and wisely by just trusting the steps and the Petipa vibe, as Pagliero did – this mini-epic could offer a much less bombastic ending to Swan Lake.

Suite of Dances brought Ophélie Gaillard’s cello back up downstage for a face to face with Hugo Marchand in one of those “just you and me and the music” escapades that Jerome Robbins had imagined a long time before a “platform” meant anything less than a stage’s wooden floor.  I admit I had preferred the mysterious longing Mathias Heymann had brought to the solo back in 2018 — especially to the largo movement. Tonight, this honestly jolly interpretation, infused with a burst of “why not?” energy, pulled me into Marchand’s space and mindset. Here was a guy up there on stage daring to tease you, me, and oh yes the cellist with equally wry amusement, just as Baryshnikov once had dared.  All those little jaunty summersaults turn out to look even cuter and sillier on a tall guy. The cocky Fancy Free sailor struts in part four were tossed off in just the right way: I am and am so not your alpha male, but if you believe anything I’m sayin’, we’re good to go.

The evening wound down with a homeopathic dose of Romantic frou-frou, as we were forced to watch one of those “We are so in love. Yes, we are still in love” out of context pas de deux, This one was extracted from John Neumeier’s La Dame aux Camélias.

An ardent Mathieu Ganio found himself facing a Laura Hecquet devoted to smoothing down her fluffy costume and stiff hair. When Neumeier’s pas was going all horizontal and swoony, Ganio gamely kept replacing her gently onto her pointes as if she deserved valet parking.  But unlike, say, Anna Karina leaning dangerously out of her car to kiss Belmondo full throttle in Pierrot le Fou, Hecquet simply refused to hoist herself even one millimeter out of her seat for the really big lifts. She was dead weight, and I wanted to scream. Unlike almost any dancer I have ever seen, Hecquet still persists in not helping her co-driver. She insists on being hoisted and hauled around like a barrel. Partnering should never be about driving the wrong way down a one-way street.

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

En deux programmes : l’adieu à Benji

Programme Cunningham / Forsythe. Soirées du 26 avril et du 9 mai.

Programme Balanchine / Robbins / Cherkaoui-Jaletoirée du 2 mai.

Le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris poursuit et achève avec deux programmes simultanés sa saison Millepied sous direction Dupont : la soirée De Keersmacker (à qui on fait décidément beaucoup trop d’honneur) est un plan « B » après l’annulation d’une création du directeur démissionnaire et La Sylphide était une concession faite au répertoire maison.

*

*                                                             *

Avec le programme Balanchine-Robbins-Cherkaoui/Jalet, c’est Benji-New York City Ballet qui s’exprime. Les soirées unifiées par le choix d’un compositeur  – ici, Maurice Ravel – mais illustrée par des chorégraphes différents sont monnaie courante depuis l’époque de Balanchine dans cette compagnie.

C’est ainsi. Les anciens danseurs devenus directeurs apportent souvent avec eux les formules ou le répertoire qui était celui de leur carrière active. Cela peut avoir son intérêt quand ce répertoire est choisi avec discernement. Malheureusement, Benjamin Millepied en manque un peu quand il s’agit de Balanchine.

La Valse en ouverture de soirée, est un Balanchine de 1951 qui porte le lourd et capiteux parfum de son époque. C’est une œuvre très « Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo » avec décors symbolistes (une salle de bal fantomatique), costumes précieux (gants blancs pour tout le monde) et sous-texte onirique. Des duos solistes incarnent tour à tour différents stades de la vie d’un couple (sur les Valses nobles et sentimentales de 1912), trois créatures échappées d’un magazine de papier glacé figurent les Parques et une jeune fille en blanc délaisse son partenaire pour succomber aux charmes d’un dandy qui n’est autre que la mort (La Valse, 1920).

Le soir de la première, la pièce est dansée de manière crémeuse par le ballet de l’Opéra (et non staccato comme l’a fait le New York City Ballet l’été dernier aux Étés de la Danse), les trois Parques (mesdemoiselles Gorse, Boucaud et Hasboun) ont de jolies mains et leurs évolutions sémaphoriques captent l’attention. On leur reprochera peut-être un petit manque d’abandon dionysiaque lorsqu’elles se jettent dans les bras de partenaires masculins. Les couples, qui préfigurent In the night de Robbins sont clairement reconnaissables – c’était au le cas lors de la visite du Miami City Ballet en 2011, mais pas dans l’interprétation du New York City Ballet en juillet dernier. Emmanuel Thibaut est charmant en amoureux juvénile aux côtés de Muriel Zusperreguy. Audric Bezard est l’amant mûr parfait aux côtés de Valentine Colasante qui déploie la bonne énergie. Hugo Marchand prête ses belles lignes au soliste aux prises avec les trois Parques. Sa partenaire, Hannah O’Neill, n’est pas nécessairement des plus à l’aise dans ce ballet. On s’en étonne.

Dans la soliste blanche aux prises avec la mort, Dorothée Gilbert délivre une interprétation correcte mais sans véritable engagement. Mathieu Ganio fait de même. C’est la mort de Florian Magnenet, élégante, violente et implacable à la fois, qui retient l’attention.

Mais très curieusement, même si la danse est fluide et élégante et qu’on ressent un certain plaisir à la vue des danseurs, on ne peut s’empêcher de penser que ce Balanchine qui semble plus préoccupé de narration que d’incarnation de la musique est bien peu …balanchinien. Si ce ballet portait le label « Lifar » ou « Petit », ne serait-il pas immédiatement et impitoyablement disqualifié comme vieillerie sans intérêt ?

La direction Millepied aura décidement été caractérisée par l’introduction ou la réintroduction au répertoire de pièces secondaires et dispensables du maître incontesté de la danse néoclassique.

En seconde partie de soirée, c’est finalement Robbins qui se montre plus balanchinien que son maître. En Sol est une incarnation dynamique du Concerto pour piano en sol de Ravel. Le texte chorégraphique épouse sans l’illustrer servilement la dualité de la partition de Ravel entre structure classique (Ravel disait « C’est un Concerto au plus strict sens du terme, écrit dans l’esprit de ceux de Mozart ») et rythmes syncopés du jazz pour la couleur locale. Les danseurs du corps de ballet prennent en main le côté ludique de la partition et les facéties de l’orchestre : ils sont tour à tour jeunesse de plage, meneurs de revue ou crabes prenant le soleil sur le sable. Ils sont menés dans le premier et le troisième mouvement par les deux solistes « académiques » qui s’encanaillent à l’instar du piano lui-même. Le classique revient dans toute sa pureté aussi bien dans la fosse d’orchestre que sur le plateau pour le deuxième mouvement. Le couple danse un pas de deux solaire et mélancolique à la fois sur les sinuosités plaintives du – presque – solo du piano. Jerome Robbins, homme de culture, cite tendrement ses deux univers (Broadway et la danse néo-classique) mais pas seulement. L’esthétique des costumes et décors d’Erté, très art-déco, sont une citation du Train Bleu de Nijinska-Milhaud-Cocteau de 1926, presque contemporain du Concerto. Mais là où Cocteau avait voulu du trivial et du consommable « un ballet de 1926 qui sera démodé en 1927 » (l’intérêt majeur du ballet était un décor cubiste d’Henri Laurens, artiste aujourd’hui assez oublié), Robbins-Ravel touchent au lyrisme et à l’intemporel.

En Sol a été très régulièrement repris par le Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris depuis son entrée au répertoire en 1975 (en même temps que La Valse). Les jeunes danseurs de la nouvelle génération se lancent avec un enthousiasme roboratif sur leur partition (Barbeau, Ibot, Madin et Marque se distinguent). C’est également le cas pour le couple central qui n’a peur de rien. Léonore Baulac a le mouvement délié particulièrement la taille et le cou (ma voisine me fait remarquer que les bras pourraient être plus libérés. Sous le charme, je dois avouer que je n’y ai vu que du feu). Elle a toute confiance en son partenaire, Germain Louvet, à la ligne classique claire et aux pirouettes immaculées.

Boléro de Jalet-Cherkaoui-Abramovitch, qui termine la soirée, reste aussi horripilant par son esthétique soignée que par son manque de tension. On est captivé au début par la mise en scène, entre neige télévisuelle du temps des chaines publiques et cercles hypnotiques des économiseurs d’écran. Mais très vite, les onze danseurs (dix plus une) lancés dans une transe de derviche-tourneur restent bloqués au même palier d’intensité. Leur démultiplication n’est pas le fait de l’habilité des chorégraphes mais du grand miroir suspendu obliquement à mi-hauteur de la scène. Les costumes de Riccardo Tisci d’après l’univers de Marina Abramovic, à force d’être jolis passent à côté de la danse macabre. Ils seront bientôt les témoins désuets d’une époque (les années 2010) qui mettait des têtes de mort partout (tee-shirts, bijoux et même boutons de portes de placard).

Rien ne vient offrir un équivalent à l’introduction progressive de la masse orchestrale sur le continuo mélodique. Que cherchaient à faire les auteurs de cette piécette chic ? À offrir une version en trois dimensions de la première scène « abstraite » de Fantasia de Walt Disney ? Le gros du public adore. C’est vrai, Boléro de Cherkaoui-Jalet-Abramovic est une pièce idéale pour ceux qui n’aiment pas la danse.

*

*                                                             *

Avec le programme Cunningham-Forsythe, le ballet de l’Opéra est accommodé à la sauce Benji-LA Dance Project. Paradoxalement, ce placage fonctionne mieux en tant que soirée. Les deux chorégraphes font partie intégrante de l’histoire de la maison et les pièces choisies, emblématiques, sont des additions de choix au répertoire.

Walkaround Time est une œuvre où l’ennui fait partie de la règle du jeu comme souvent chez Cunningham. Les décors de Jasper Johns d’après Marcel Duchamp ont un petit côté ballon en celluloïd. Ils semblent ne faire aucun sens et finissent pourtant par faire paysage à la dernière minute. La chorégraphie avec ses fentes en parallèle, ses triplettes prises de tous côtés, ses arabesques projetées sur des bustes à la roideur initiale de planche à repasser mais qui s’animent soudain par des tilts ou des arches, tend apparemment vers la géométrie et l’abstraction : une danseuse accomplit une giration en arabesque, entre promenade en dehors et petits temps levés par 8e de tour. Pourtant, il se crée subrepticement une alchimie entre ces danseurs qui ne se regardent pas et ne jouent pas de personnages. Des enroulements presque gymniques, des portés géométriques émane néanmoins une aura d’intimité humaine : Caroline Bance fait des développés 4e en dedans sur une très haute demi pointe et crée un instant de suspension spirituelle. La bande-son feutrée, déchirée seulement à la fin d’extraits de poèmes dada, crée un flottement sur lequel on peut se laisser porter. En fait, c’est la partie non dansée de quelques huit minutes qui détermine si on tient l’attention sur toute la longueur de la pièce. Le premier soir, un danseur accomplit un étirement de dos au sol en attitude avec buste en opposé puis se met à changer la position par quart de tour ressemblant soudain à ces petits personnages en caoutchouc gluant que des vendeurs de rue jettent sur les vitres des grands magasins. Le deuxième soir, les danseurs se contentent de se chauffer sur scène. Mon attention s’émousse irrémédiablement…

Dans ce programme bien construit, Trio de William Forsythe prend naturellement la suite de Walkaround Time. Lorsque les danseurs (affublés d’improbables costumes bariolés) montrent des parties de leur corps dans le silence, on pense rester dans la veine aride d’un Cunningham. Mais le ludique ne tarde pas à s’immiscer. À l’inverse de Cunningham, Forsythe, ne refuse jamais l’interaction et la complicité avec le public.

Chacune des parties du corps exposées ostensiblement par les interprètes (un coude, la base du cou, une fesse) avec cette « attitude critique du danseur » jaugeant une partie de son anatomie comme s’il s’agissait d’une pièce de viande, deviendra un potentiel « départ de mouvement ».

Car si Cunningham a libéré le corps en en faisant pivoter le buste au dessus des hanches, Forsythe l’a déconstruit et déstructuré. Les emmêlements caoutchouteux de Trio emportent toujours un danseur dans une combinaison chorégraphique par l’endroit même qui lui a été désigné par son partenaire. On reconnaît des séquences de pas, mais elles aussi sont interrompues, désarticulées en cours d’énonciation et reprises plus loin. Ceci répond à la partition musicale, des extraits en boucle d’un quatuor de Beethoven qui font irruption à l’improviste.

Les deux soirs les garçons sont Fabien Revillion, blancheur diaphane de la peau et lignes infinies et décentrées, et Simon Valastro, véritable concentré d’énergie (même ses poses ont du ressort). Quand la partenaire de ces deux compères contrastés est Ludmilla Pagliero, tout est très coulé et second degré. Quand c’est Léonore Guerineau qui mène la danse, tout devient plénitude et densité. Dans le premier cas, les deux garçons jouent avec leur partenaire, dans l’autre, ils gravitent autour d’elle. Les deux approches sont fructueuses.

Avec Herman Schmerman on voit l’application des principes de la libération des centres de départ du mouvement et de la boucle chorégraphique à la danse néoclassique. Le quintette a été crée pour les danseurs du NYCB. Comme à son habitude, le chorégraphe y a glissé des citations du répertoire de la maison avec laquelle il avait été invité à travailler. On reconnaît par exemple des fragments d’Agon qui auraient été accélérés. Les danseurs de l’Opéra se coulent à merveille dans ce style trop souvent dévoyé par un accent sur l’hyper-extension au détriment du départ de mouvement et du déséquilibre. Ici, les pieds ou les genoux deviennent le point focal dans un développé arabesque au lieu de bêtement forcer le penché pour compenser le manque de style. Le trio de filles du 26 avril (mesdemoiselles Bellet, Stojanov et Osmont) se distingue particulièrement. Les garçons ne sont pas en reste. Pablo Legasa impressionne par l’élasticité et la suspension en l’air de ses sauts. Avec lui, le centre du mouvement semble littéralement changer de  situation pendant ses stations en l’air. Vincent Chaillet est lui comme la pointe sèche de l’architecte déconstructiviste qui brise et distord une ligne classique pour la rendre plus apparente.

Dans le pas de deux, rajouté par la suite à Francfort pour Tracy-Kai Maier et Marc Spradling, Amandine Albisson toute en souplesse et en félinité joue le contraste avec Audric Bezard, volontairement plus « statuesque » et marmoréen au début mais qui se laisse gagner par les invites de sa partenaire, qu’il soit gainé de noir ou affublé d’une jupette jaune citron unisexe qui fait désormais partie de l’histoire de la danse.

On ne peut s’empêcher de penser que Millepied a trouvé dans le ballet de l’Opéra, pour lequel il a eu des mots aussi durs que déplacés, des interprètes qui font briller un genre de programme dont il est friand mais qui, avec sa compagnie de techniciens passe-partout, aurait touché à l’ennui abyssal.

 

C’est pour cela qu’on attendait et qu’on aimait Benji à l’Opéra : son œil pour les potentiels solistes.

Après deux décennies de nominations au pif -trop tôt, trop tard ou jamais- de solistes bras cassés ou de méritants soporifiques, cette « génération Millepied » avec ses personnalités bien marquées avait de quoi donner de l’espoir. Dommage que le directeur pressé n’ait pas pris le temps de comprendre l’école et le corps de ballet.

Et voilà, c’est une autre, formée par la direction précédente qui nomme des étoiles et qui récolte le fruit de ce qui a été semé.

Que les soirées soient plus enthousiasmantes du point de vue des distributions ne doit cependant pas nous tromper. Des signes inquiétants de retours aux errements d’antan sont déjà visibles. Le chèque en blanc signé à Jérémie Belingard, étoile à éclipse de la compagnie, pour ses adieux n’est pas de bon augure. Aurélie Dupont offre au sortant une mise en scène arty à grands renforts d’effets lumineux qui n’ont pu que coûter une blinde. Sur une musique qui veut jouer l’atonalité mais tombe vite dans le sirupeux, Bélingard esquisse un pas, roule sur l’eau, remue des pieds la tête en bas dans une veine « teshigaouaresque ».  L’aspiration se veut cosmique, elle est surtout d’un ennui sidéral. Le danseur disparaît sous les effets de lumière. Il laisse le dernier mot à un ballon gonflé à l’hélium en forme de requin : une métaphore de sa carrière à l’opéra? C’est triste et c’est embarrassant.

L’avenir est plus que jamais nébuleux à l’Opéra.

 

Commentaires fermés sur En deux programmes : l’adieu à Benji

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique