Archives de Tag: Paris Opera Ballet

Swan Lake in Paris: a chalice half empty or half full?

Le Lac des Cygnes, February 26, 2019, Paris Opera Ballet.

[Nb : des passages de l’article sont traduits en français]

Swan Lake confronts the dancers and audience with musical leitmotifs, archetypes, story elements (down to the prince’s name), and dramatic conundrums that all seem to have been lifted willy-nilly from Richard Wagner.

Today, for those who worship ballet, including dancers, a perfect performance of Swan Lake ranks right up there with the Holy Grail. Yet the first full-length performances in the West only happened only a little over a half-century ago. Each version you see picks and choses from a plethora of conflicting Russian memories. The multiple adaptations of this fairy tale so Manicheaen that it’s downright biblical – good vs. evil, white vs. black, angelic vs. satanic – most often defy us to believe in it. The basic story kind of remains the same but “God is in the details,” as Mies van der Rohe once pronounced. The details and overall look of some or other productions, just as the projection and nuance of some or other dancers, either works for you or does not despite the inebriating seductiveness of Tchaikovsky’s thundering score.

Siegfried

Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth. Proverbs 27:1

Just as the Templars and others obsessed with the Grail did, many ballet dancers can   succumb to wounds. The re-re-re-castings for this series due to injuries have engendered a kind of “hesitation waltz” on stage.

As he settled in to his mini-throne downstage right on February 26th, Florian Magnenet (originally only an understudy) was clearly exhausted already, probably due to doing double-duty in a punishingly hyperkinetic modern ballet across town on other nights. Once it was clear he had to do this ballet, why hadn’t the director released him and used an understudy for the Goeke? While the company prides itself on versatility, it is also big enough that another could have taken over that chore.

Perhaps Magnenet was using his eyes and face to dramatize the prince, looking soulful or something (the stuff that comped critics can see easily from their seats). But raised eyebrows do not read into outer space. From the cheap seats you only see if the body acts through how it phrases the movement, through the way an extension is carried down to the finish, through the way a spine arches. Nothing happened, Magnenet’s body didn’t yearn. I saw a nice young man, not particularly aching with questions, tiredly polite throughout Act I. While at first I had hoped he was under-dancing on purpose for some narrative reason, the Nureyev adagio variation confirmed that the music was indeed more melancholy than this prince. Was one foot aching instead?

« Florian Magnenet […] était clairement déjà épuisé par son double-emploi dans une purge moderne et inutilement hyperkinétique exécutée de l’autre côté de la ville les autres soirs.

Peut-être Magnenet utilisait-il ses yeux ou son visage pour rendre son prince dramatique, éloquent ou quelque chose du genre […]. Mais un froncement de sourcils ne se lit pas sur longue distance. […] Rien ne se passait ; le corps de Magnenet n’aspirait à rien. J’ai vu un gentil garçon, qui ne souffrait pas particulièrement de questionnement existentiel […]. Souffrait-il plutôt d’un pied ? »

Odette

Who can find a virtuous woman? For her price is far above rubies. Proverbs 31:10

And…Odile

The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in kings’ palaces. Proverbs 30:28

While for some viewers, the three hours of Swan Lake boil down to the thirty seconds of Odile’s 32 fouetté turns, for me the alchemy of partnering matters more than anything else. As it should. This is a love story, not a circus act.

Due to the casting shuffles, our Elsa/Odette and Kundry/Odile seemed as surprised as the Siegfried to have landed up on the same stage. While this potentially could create mutual fireworks, alas, the end result was indeed as if each one of the pair was singing in a different opera.

For all of Act II on February 26th, Amandine Albisson unleashed a powerful bird with a magnetic wingspan and passion and thickly contoured and flowing lines. Yet she seemed to be beating her wings against the pane of glass that was Florian Magnenet. I had last seen her in December in complete dramatic syncronicity with the brazenly woke and gorgeously expressive body of Audric Bezard in La Dame aux camelias. There they called out, and responded to, all of the emotions embodied by Shakepeare’s Sonnet 88 [The one that begins with “If thou should be disposed to set me light.”] I’d put my draft of a review aside, utterly certain that Bezard and Albisson would be reunited in Swan Lake. Therefore I knew that coming off of that high, seeing her with another guy, was going to be hard to take no matter what. But not this hard. Here Albisson’s Odette was ready to release herself into the moment. But while she tried to engage the cautious and self-effacing Magnenet, synchronicity just didn’t happen. Indeed their rapport once got so confused they lost the counts and ended up elegantly walking around each other at one moment during the grand adagio.

« Durant tout l’acte II, le 26 février, Amandine Albisson a déployé un puissant oiseau doté de magnétiques battements d’ailes, de passion et de lignes à la fois vigoureusement dessinées et fluides. Et pourtant, elle semblait abîmer ses ailes contre la paroi vitrée qu’était Florian Magnenet. »

« A un moment, leur rapport devint si confus qu’ils perdirent les comptes et se retrouvèrent à se tourner autour pendant le grand adage. » […]

This is such a pity. Albisson put all kinds of imagination into variations on the duality of femininity. I particularly appreciated how her Odette’s and Odile’s neck and spine moved in completely differently ways and kept sending new and different energies all the way out to her fingertips and down through her toes. I didn’t need binoculars in Act IV in order to be hit by the physicality of the pure despair of her Odette. Magnenet’s Siegfried had warmed up a little by the end. His back came alive. That was nice.

« Quel dommage, Albisson met toutes sortes d’intentions dans ses variations sur le thème de la dualité féminine. J’ai particulièrement apprécié la façon dont le cou et le dos de son Odette et son Odile se mouvaient de manière complètement différente » […]

Rothbart

The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon the rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid. Proverbs 30:19

François Alu knows how to connect with the audience as well as with everyone on stage. His Tutor/von Rothbart villain, a role puffed up into a really danced one by Nureyev, pretty much took over the narrative. Even before his Act III variation – as startlingly accelerated and decelerated as the flicker of the tongue of a venomous snake – Alu carved out his space with fiery intelligence and chutzpah.

« François Alu a le don d’aimanter les spectateurs. Son tuteur/von Rothbart a peu ou prou volé la vedette au couple principal. Même avant sa variation de l’acte III – aux accélérations et décélérations aussi imprévisibles que les oscillations d’une langue de serpent – Alu a fait sa place avec intelligence et culot. » […]

As the Tutor in Act I, Alu concentrated on insinuating himself as a suave enabler, a lithe opportunist. Throughout the evening, he offered more eye-contact to both Albisson and Magnenet than they seemed to be offering to each other (and yes you can see it from far away: it impels the head and the neck and the spine in a small way that reads large). In the Black Pas, Albisson not only leaned over to catch this von Rothbart’s hints of how to vamp, she then leaned in to him, whispering gleeful reports of her triumph into the ear of this superb partner in crime.

« A l’acte I, en tuteur, Alu s’appliquait à apparaître comme un suave entremetteur, un agile opportuniste. Durant toute la soirée, il a échangé plus de regards aussi bien avec Albisson qu’avec Magnenet que les deux danseurs n’en ont échangé entre eux.

Dans le pas de deux du cygne noir, Albisson ne basculait pas seulement sur ce von Rothbart pour recevoir des conseils de séduction, elle se penchait aussi vers lui pour murmurer à l’oreille de son partenaire en méfaits l’état d’avancée de son triomphe. »

And kudos.

To Francesco Mura, as sharp as a knife in the pas de trois and the Neapolitan. To Marine Ganio’s gentle grace and feathery footwork in the Neapolitan, too. To Bianca Scudamore and Alice Catonnet in the pas de trois. All four of them have the ballon and presence and charisma that make watching dancers dance so addictive. While I may not have found the Holy Grail during this performance of Swan Lake, the lesser Knights of the Round Table – in particular the magnificently precise and plush members of the corps de ballet! – did not let me down.

* The quotes are from the King James version of The Bible.

Publicités

Commentaires fermés sur Swan Lake in Paris: a chalice half empty or half full?

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

La Dame aux camélias, Chopin-Neumeier, Paris Opera Ballet, Palais Garnier, December 7th and 14th, 2018.

In Alexander Dumas Jr’s tale, two kinds of texts are paramount: a leather-bound copy of Manon Lescaut that gets passed from hand to hand, and then the so many other words that a young, loving, desperate, and dying courtesan scribbles down in defense of her right to love and be loved. John Neumeier’s ballet seeks to bring the unspoken to life.

*

*                                                     *

In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire/That on the ashes of […] youth doth lie […] Consumed with that which it was nourished by./ This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,/To love that well which thou must leave ere long.”
Shakepeare, Sonnet 73

Léonore Baulac, Mathieu Ganio, La Dame au camélias, December 7, 2018.

On December 7th, Léonore Baulac’s youthful and playful and feisty Marguerite evoked those posthumous stories on YouTube that memorialize a dead young person’s upbeat videos about living with cancer.

Normally, the bent-in elbows and wafting forearms are played as a social construct: “My hands say ‘blah, blah, blah.’ Isn’t that what you expect to hear?” Baulac used the repeated elbows-in gestures to release her forearms: the shapes that ensued made one think the extremities were the first part of her frame that had started to die, hands cupped in as if no longer able to resist the heavy weight of the air. Yet she kept seeking joy and freedom, a Traviata indeed.

The febrile energy of Baulac’s Marguerite responded quickly to Mathieu Ganio’s delicacy and fiery gentility, almost instantly finding calm whenever she could brush against the beauty of his body and soul. She could breathe in his arms and surrender to his masterful partnering. The spirit of Dumas Jr’s original novel about seize-the-day young people came to life. Any and every lift seemed controlled, dangerous, free, and freshly invented, as if these kids were destined to break into a playground at night.

From Bernhardt to Garbo to Fonteyn, we’ve seen an awful lot of actresses pretending that forty is the new twenty-four. Here that was not the case. Sometimes young’uns can act up a storm, too!

*                                                     *

Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,/Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.
Sonnet 66

Laura Hecquet, Florian Magnenet, La Dame aux camélias, December 14, 2018

On December 14th, Laura Hecquet indeed played older and wiser and more fragile and infinitely more melancholy and acceptant of her doom from the beginning than the rebellious Baulac. Even Hecquet’s first coughs seemed more like sneezes, as if she were allergic to her social destiny. I was touched by the way she often played at slow-mo ralentis that she could stitch in against the music as if she were reviewing the story of her life from the great beyond. For most of Act One Hecquet seemed too studied and poised. I wanted to shake her by the shoulders. I wondered if she would ever, ever just let go during the rest of the ballet. Maybe that was just her way of thinking Marguerite out loud? I would later realize that the way she kept delicately tracing micro-moods within moods defined the signature of her interpretation of Marguerite.

Only a Florian Magnenet – who has finally taken detailed control of all the lines of his body, especially his feet, yet who has held on to all of his his youthful energy and power – could awaken this sleeping beauty. At first he almost mauled the object of his desires in an eager need to shake her out of her clearly-defined torpor. Something began to click.

The horizontal swoops of the choreography suited this couple. Swirling mid-height lifts communicated to the audience exactly what swirling mid-height lifts embody: you’ve swept me off my feet. But Hecquet got too careful around the many vertical lifts that are supposed to mean even more. When you don’t just take a big gulp of air while saying to yourself “I feel light as a feather/hare krishna/you make me feel like dancin’!” and hurl your weight up to the rafters, you weigh down on your partner, no matter how strong he is. Nothing disastrous, nevertheless: unless the carefully-executed — rather than the ecstatic — disappoints you.

Something I noticed that I wish I hadn’t: Baulac took infinite care to tenderly sweep her fluffy skirts out of Ganio’s face during lifts and made it seem part of their play. Hecquet let her fluffy skirts go where they would to the point of twice rendering Magnenet effectively blind. Instead of taking care of him, Hecquet repeatedly concentrated on keeping her own hair off her face. I leave it to you as to the dramatic impact, but there is something called “telling your hairdresser what you want.” Should that fail, there is also a most useful object called “bobby-pin,” which many ballerinas have used before and has often proved less distracting to most of the audience.

*

*                                                     *

When thou reviewest this, thou dost review/ The very part was consecrate to thee./The earth can have but earth, which is his due;/My spirit is thine, the better part of me.
Sonnet 74

Of Manons and about That Father
Alexandre Dumas Jr. enfolded texts within texts in “La Dame aux camélias:” Marguerite’s diary, sundry letters, and a volume of l’Abbé Prévost’s both scandalous albeit moralizing novel about a young woman gone astray, “Manon Lescaut.” John Neumeier decided to make the downhill trajectory of Manon and her lover Des Grieux a leitmotif — an intermittent momento mori – that will literally haunt the tragedy of Marguerite and Armand. Manon is at first presented as an onstage character observed and applauded by the others on a night out,  but then she slowly insinuates herself into Marguerite’s subconscious. As in: you’ve become a whore, I am here to remind you that there is no way out.

On the 14th, Ludmila Pagliero was gorgeous. The only problem was that until the last act she seemed to think she was doing the MacMillan version of Manon. On the 7th, a more sensual and subtle Eve Grinsztajn gave the role more delicacy, but then provided real-time trouble. Something started to give out, and she never showed up on stage for the final pas de trois where Manon and des Grieux are supposed to ease Marguerite into accepting the inevitable. Bravo to Marc Moreau’s and Léonore Baulac’s stage smarts, their deep knowledge of the choreography, their acting chops, and their talent for improvisation. The audience suspected nothing. Most only imagined that Marguerite, in her terribly lonely last moments, found more comfort in fiction than in life.

Neumeier – rather cruelly – confines Armand’s father to sitting utterly still on the downstage right lip of the stage for too much of the action. Some of those cast in this role do appear to be thinking, or breathing at the very least. But on December 7th, even when called upon to move, the recently retired soloist Yann Saïz seemed made of marble, his eyes dead. Mr. Duval may be an uptight bourgeois, but he is also an honest provincial who has journeyed up from the South and is unused to Parisian ways. Saïz’s monolithic interpretation did indeed make Baulac seem even more vulnerable in the confrontation scene, much like a moth trying to break away by beating its wings against a pane of glass. But his stolid interpretation made me wonder whether those in the audience who were new to this ballet didn’t just think her opponent was yet another duke.

On December 14th, Andrey Klemm, who also teaches company class, found a way to embody a lifetime of regret by gently calibrating those small flutters of hands, the stuttering movements where you start in one direction then stop, sit down, pop up, look here, look there, don’t know what to do with your hands. Klemm’s interpretation of Mr. Duval radiated a back-story: that of a man who once, too, may have fallen inappropriately in love and been forced to obey society’s rules. As gentle and rueful as a character from Edith Wharton, you could understand that he recognized his younger self in his son.

Commentaires fermés sur La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Zurich, The Nutcracker : Princess

« Vous me faîtes danser, très cher! ». Dessin « Lesperluette »

Nussknacker und Mausekönig, Tchaikovsky-Spuck, Ballett Zurich, December 26, 2018.

In his Nussknacker und Mausekönig for Ballett Zürich, Christian Spuck demonstrates how deeply he understands your greatest regret about having had to grow up: not that ability to consume enormous amounts of candied nuts without getting sick, but your having lost that once unforced openness to magical thinking. It’s been too long since that time when you knew how to look beyond the obvious, when wonder seemed natural and “sliding doors” normal, when your dolls were not “toys” but snarky and sassy and opinionated and utterly real living beings.

Spuck also demonstrates how well he understands our second greatest regret about having had to grow up: realizing that now it’s your turn to take the kids to see The Nutcracker. Most versions of this holiday staple have this in common: cloying sweetness and one hell of a loose and dramatically limp plot. Act 1: girl gets a toy on Christmas Eve, duh, big surprise. People in ill-fitting mouse costumes try to launch a rebellion that gets squashed in three minutes and twenty seconds flat [if you listen to the version by Fedoseyev and the USSR Radio-TV Symphony Orchestra]. Unh-huh. It snows. Well, that can happen in December. Act Two: she dreams of random dances that have something to do with sugar or flowers. Like, wow. Why did anyone think this drivel would ever be of interest to children? When I was small, I came out of this – my first ballet — sorely offended by this insult to my intelligence…and to my imagination.

Spuck’s exhilarating rethinking of this old chestnut returns to the original story by E.T.A. Hoffmann in order to scrape off thick layers of saccharine thinking. Newly told, a real narrative takes us back to a surreal and fantastical realm that is both familiar yet often unsettling and keeps you guessing right up to the end.

But first I must confess that the desire to see one of the Paris Opera Ballet’s many talented dancers “on leave” this season originally inspired my pilgrimage to Zurich. Eléonore Guérineau is alive and well and lived it up as Princess Pirlipat. She has taken to Spuck’s style like a duck to water [or, given the nuts, like a squirrel to a tree]. Her fairy-tale princess read as if her Lise from the Palais Garnier had spent the interim closely observing the velvety perversity of cats rather than the scratchy innocence of chickens. – The way Guérineau adjusted the bow of her dress differently each time added layer upon layer to her character, including a soupçon of Bette Davis’s Baby Jane, totally in keeping with Hoffmann’s sense of how the beautiful and the bizarre intersect. Our Parisian ballerina’s chiseled lines and plush push remain intact, and the two kids in front of me immediately got that she was Marie’s sassier alter-ego (and were disappointed every time she left the stage).

Pirlipat? Are you confused? Good!

Ballett Zürich – Nussknacker und Mausekönig – La princesse Pirlipat(Eléonore Guérineau), sa cour et le roi des souris.
© Gregory Batardon

A central part of the original story was lost when Alexandre Dumas [he of The Three Musketeers] translated – and severely bowdlerized — Hoffmann’s tale into French. As Petipa and Tchaikovsky used Dumas’s version, one can begin to understand why the classic scenario falls so flat and leaves so much dramatic potential just beyond reach. Just why is Marie so obsessed with this really ugly toy? Just because she is a nice, kind-hearted girl en route motherhood? Bo-ring. You see, in the original tale Marie already knows that the wooden toy is not an ersatz baby.

The missing link of most Nutcrackers resides within a tale within the tale, one that Drosselmeier dangles before Marie across three bedtimes, “The Tale of Princess Pirlipat.” As brought to the stage by Spuck, this Princess is Aurora as spoiled 13-year-old Valley Girl. Already grossed-out by four over-eager and foppish suitors who chase her around with their lips puckered and going “mwah-mwah,” Pirlipat’s troubles only worsen when her father takes out a mouse. The Mouse Queen’s curse turns the girl into a nutcrackeress rabidly hungry for nuts, not roses. [As the queen, Elizabeth Wisenberg offers a pitch-perfect distillation of what is so scary about Carabosse] A handsome surfer dude/nerd prince [Alexander Jones, geeky, tender, masterful, as you desire] comes to Pirlipat’s rescue, only to be slimed in turn. Not passive at all, Marie will plunge this parallel universe in a quest to save him.

Ballett Zürich – Nussknacker und Mausekönig – La reine des souris (ici Melissa Ligurgo)
© Gregory Batardon

Everything in Nussknacker und Mausekönig has been has been reexamined and reconsidered by Christian Spuck. The score – jumbled up and judiciously reassigned – emerges completely refreshed and unpredictable: when was the last time you did NOT cringe at what was going on to the music for the “Chinese” dance? More than that (and many times more), Spuck will address the fact that many people can’t get enough of Tchaikovsky’s celesta&harp-driven “Sugarplum” variation [One minute 48 seconds, if you go by Fedoseyev]. Here, before we even get to the overture – placed way further down the line and, oh heaven, that music will be danced to for once — the action starts when a lonely automaton with a bad case of dropsy plays the Sugarplum theme on an…accordion. The same melody will return to haunt the action intermittently, refracted into a leitmotif, rather than sticking out as a sole “number.” By thoughtfully reassigning other parts of the score, the ballet loses some of what now seems offensive: grandma and grandpa use their canes for a slightly-off vaudeville number to the music of Marie’s solo, which makes them seem jaunty and spry rather than creaky old fools [the determined yet airborne Mélanie Borel and Filipe Portugal manage to suggest a whole lifetime in the theater. This sly duo would deserve to have their story told in a ballet all to themselves]; the “Arabian/Coffee” music is scooped up by a whirling Sugarplum fairy replete with tempting cupcake-dotted tutu [Elena Vostrotina, a tad ill at ease] ; instead of that embarrassing Turk with moustache and scimitar you get a horde of mice with whiskers all a-quiver…I think I’ve already blabbed too much. The whole evening feels like munching through a box of Cracker Jacks. Each caramelized kernel tastes so good you lose sight of hunting for the “surprise.”

Spuck takes infinite care to adapt the movement to each specific type of doll or creature. Indeed, at first only Marie (a.k.a. Clara in some versions) could be said to be the one person who dances…normally [the radiant and silken Meiri Maeda, whose face and body act without calling attention to the fact that she is acting]. Mechanical ones, in the vein of Hoffmann’s Olympia or Coppelia, use the beloved straight leg with flexed foot walk and stiff bust that follows, complete with those elbows bent up like pitchforks. That is, until Marie assumes they are real and the sharp edges soften. Raggedy dolls – such as the sarcastic and powder-wigged Columbine (Yen Han, as sly and ironic as the M.C. in Cabaret, but infinitely more elegant) – flop to the ground and then get swept up, crisply bent in two. Fritz’s army of timid tin soldiers wobble dangerously (and hilariously) as if fresh from the forge. Wheels of all varieties will be worn to shape and typify certain characters. (Sorry, I’m not going to spoil any more of these delightful surprises).

Ballett Zürich – Nussknacker und Mausekönig – Clowns (Ina Callejas, Daniel Muligan et Yen Han)
© Gregory Batardon

And Zurich’s Drosselmeier ain’t no harmlessly doting godfather. He is a moody and masterful manipulator. In Hoffmann’s tale, his hold over Marie stems from sitting rather eerily on the edge of her bed every night and enthralling her with fantastical bedtime stories until she can no longer tell the real from the unreal. To translate this, the set design involves a tiny stage within a stage on the stage where all – even Marie’s parents – fall under his spell. His costume evokes some of the more lunatic figures in children’s literature: Willy Wonka, The Mad Hatter, The Cat in the Hat. And so will his movement. Have you ever watched marionettists at work? Their bodies dart and swoop and wiggle without pause. Their fingers are the scariest: flickering as rapidly as bats’ tongues. And Drosselmeier’s fingers are all over the place. As they delicately creep all over the feisty Marie, children and adults alike will judge him in their own ways. He swoops, he scuttles, he drops into second plié and sways it, his legs shoot out in high dévelopé kicks and flash-fast raccourcis. When the “Rat” theme devolves to not only Jan Casier’s hypnotic Drosselmeier but also to the coven of his twitchy doubles, the musical switch makes perfect sense.

 

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

The cozy auditorium of the Zurich opera house resembles a neo-Rococo jewel box. Spuck’s sparkling and multi-faceted Nutcracker nestles perfectly inside it.

Commentaires fermés sur Zurich, The Nutcracker : Princess

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs)

Un argument pour « Cendrillon » de Rudolf Noureev

A Paris, à l’Opéra Bastille, du 26 novembre 2018 au 2 janvier 2019. 

Musique de Serge Prokofiev. Chorégraphie de Rudolf Noureev.

Serge Prokofiev a composé Cendrillon durant la Deuxième guerre mondiale pour Galina Oulanova, alors au Bolshoï de Moscou. La partition parvient à faire ressortir toute la douceur, l’ironie, et même les aspects les plus violents du conte de fée classique transcrit à l’origine par Charles Perrault dans son chef-d’œuvre de 1697, Histoires du temps passé.

En 1986, le directeur de la danse du ballet de l’opéra de Paris, Rudolf Noureev à l’époque, décida de créer un véhicule pour la plus jeune étoile de la compagnie, la si talentueuse Sylvie Guillem. Inspiré par leur mutuelle adoration des grands classiques du cinéma hollywoodien, le résultat est une Cendrillon décalée. Actualisant le « jadis, dans un pays lointain », le ballet rend hommage à l’ère des films muets et des premières comédies musicales du grand écran : le monde de Charlie Chaplin et de Fred Astaire.

ACTE UN (45 minutes)

Scène 1 : dans la maison de Cendrillon, Los Angeles, quelque part durant l’âge d’Or hollywoodien.

La belle mère et les deux sœurs par alliance de Cendrillon, méchantes et dépourvues de talent, se disputent, cousent et se disputent encore sous le regard de la pauvre fille. Lorsqu’elle se retrouve seule pour un moment, Cendrillon se permet des rêves d’étoile… ou, au moins, que son père cesse d’abuser de la bouteille. Sorti de nulle part, un mystérieux inconnu qui semble avoir été victime d’un accident routier s’effondre dans leur living room. Cendrillon est la seule qui tente de l’aider.

Contre toute attente, les demi-sœurs ont décoché de petits rôles dans un film musical dans la veine Busby Berkeley : des costumes sont livrés et le chorégraphe vient essayer de mettre les filles au point. Quand tous sont partis pour les studios, Cendrillon cesse d’astiquer le sol et s’amuse à imiter les nombreuses stars qu’elle a vues au cinéma.

À son grand étonnement, le mystérieux inconnu revient et lui révèle qu’il est un célèbre producteur de cinéma. L’emportant dans sa cape comme une fée-marraine, il l’emmène jusque dans ses studios.

Scène 2 : les studios d’Hollywood

Parce que Cendrillon doit choisir une robe pour ses débuts filmés, une flopée de danseurs virevolte dans les costumes de mode d’une collection printemps-été-automne-hiver (par la désormais légendaire Hanae Mori). Tandis que Cendrillon et le producteur regardent, ce passage se développe en un interlude dansé dans la veine des premiers films musicaux des années 30. Incorrigible, le producteur ne peut s’empêcher de s’y inviter pour une imitation de Groucho Marx (notez que Noureev a créé ce rôle sur lui-même). Mais avant qu’elle puisse prendre la route au coucher du soleil, le producteur avertit Cendrillon à propos de Minuit (douze danseurs dans d’affreux costumes qui titubent comme des créatures de Frankenstein). Quand l’horloge aura sonné son douzième coup, elle ne perdra pas que sa robe de bal et toute sa carrosserie. Les danseurs tic-taqueurs appuient sur un message bien plus amer : si notre héroïne ne se prend pas en main pour utiliser pleinement sa jeunesse, sa beauté et son talent dans les prochaines heures, elle ne vaudra pas mieux qu’une morte.

 

ENTRACTE (20 minutes)

ACTE DEUX (45 minutes)

Scène 1 : salles de tournage

Tandis que le chef de plateau et son assistant se querellent, trois films muets sont frénétiquement tournés, pour le meilleur comme pour le pire.

Scène 2 : le grand plateau

L’acteur vedette (le prince charmant), empaqueté dans du satin lamé-doré, fait sa grande entrée. Mais quand la répétition débute, il est consterné de se retrouver constamment tripoté par trois femmes absolument bizarres : les demi-sœurs et la belle-mère de Cendrillon. Bien que découragé, le chorégraphe ordonne le début des répétitions. C’est alors que, sous le regard attentif du producteur, Cendrillon fait sa grande entrée en grand ralenti cinématographique, et se révèle, dans ses screen-tests, être Ginger Rogers, Rita Hayworth et Cyd Charisse incarnées dans la même femme.

Durant la pause, un groupe d’aspirantes actrices « serveuse pour le moment » – et parées de coquets costumes de bonne – chaloupent et servent des oranges [Plaisanterie musicale : on entend une reprise de la célèbre marche de Prokofiev pour son opéra de 1919, « L’Amour des trois oranges »]. Les deux sœurs maquignonnent dans leur coin avec un des fruits afin d’attirer l’attention de la star. Mais la vedette n’a d’yeux que pour Cendrillon, et rien ne pourrait troubler le bonheur de cet adorable couple n’était le tic tac de l’horloge sonnant les douze coups de minuit.

 

ENTRACTE (20 minutes)

ACTE TROIS (40 minutes)

Scène 1 : Los Angeles

L’acteur vedette, au désespoir de retrouver Cendrillon, entraîne toute la distribution masculine et l’équipe technique dans une battue. Tels des cowboys, les gars galopent dans tous les sens pour retrouver la fille à son pied. Ils échouent dans une série de bars-clichés hollywoodiens. a) Un palais du tango/fandango/flamenco (La sœur moche #1). b) Un bar à opium chinois (la sœur moche #2). c) Un cabaret russe (la très énergique belle-mère). Mais leurs efforts ne sont pas couronnés de succès.

 

Scène 2 : retour à la maison

Cendrillon, désespérée, effrayée par la célébrité mais en même temps lasse de sa vie actuelle, se demande si le jour passé n’a pas juste été qu’un rêve. Mais son cauchemar éveillé s’achève quand la star de cinéma arrive. Bien entendu, la chaussure est à son pied. Mais avant de pouvoir danser avec son prince, elle doit signer le contrat d’exclusivité avec le studio que le producteur agite sous ses yeux. Mais peut-être la servitude à un studio vaut-elle mieux que la servitude à une belle famille ? À la fin, ce qui importe vraiment c’est que le prince charmant danse divinement. Non ?

Commentaires fermés sur Un argument pour « Cendrillon » de Rudolf Noureev

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Retours de la Grande boutique

A plot summary for Cendrillon (a.k.a. The ballet about Cinderella)

In Paris at the Opéra Bastille from November 26th, 2018, through January 2nd, 2019.
Music by Sergei Prokofiev
Choreography by Rudolf Nureyev

Sergei Prokofiev composed Cinderella during the Second World War for Galina Ulanova, then at Moscow’s Bolshoi Ballet. The musical score manages to bring out all the sweet, ironic, and even quite violent aspects of the classic fairy tale as originally transcribed by Charles Perrault in his 1697 masterpiece The Mother Goose Tales.
In 1986, the Paris Opera Ballet’s then director, Rudolf Nureyev, decided to create a vehicle for the company’s youngest and so talented ballerina, Sylvie Guillem. Inspired by their mutual adoration of classic Hollywood movies, the result is Cinderella with a twist. Updated from “long ago and far away,” the ballet pays homage to the era of silents and early Silver Screen musicals: the world of Charlie Chaplin and Fred Astaire.

ACT ONE (45 minutes)

Scene one: at Cinderella’s house, Los Angeles, sometime during Hollywood’s golden age.

Cinderella’s Stepmother and the two evil and untalented stepsisters argue, sew away furiously, and argue again as the poor girl looks on. When she finds herself alone for a moment, Cinderella allows herself to dream of stardom…or at least that her father stop drinking. Out of the blue, a mysterious stranger — who seems to have crashed some kind of vehicle outside — plops down in their living room. Cinderella is the only one who tries to help him.
Amazingly, the stepsisters have finally won bit parts in a Busby Berkeley-ish musical: costumes are delivered and the Choreographer shows up to try to put the girls through their paces. Once all are off to the studio, Cinderella stops scrubbing the floor and plays at being the many stars she’s seen at the cinema. To her astonishment, the stranger returns and reveals that he is in fact a famous Hollywood Producer. Sweeping her up into his cape like a fairy godfather, he whisks her off to his studio.

Scene two: at a Hollywood studio

Because Cinderella must chose a gown for her screen debut, a bevy of dancers swirl about in a display of couture outfits designed for spring, summer, fall, and winter by the now legendary Japanese designer Hanae Mori. As Cinderella and the Producer look on, this interlude develops into a full-scale number in the spirit of the RKO musicals. Irrepressible, the Producer butts in to the proceedings with a Groucho Marx impersonation. (Note: Nureyev created this role for himself). But before she can ride off into the sunset, the producer warns Cinderella about Midnight (twelve dancers in awful costumes who lurch around like Frankenstein’s monster). Once the clock strikes twelve, she will lose not only her gown and carriage. The tick-tocking dancers insist upon a much more bitter message through their movement: if our heroine does not take charge and use her youth, beauty, and talent to their fullest during the next few hours, she would be better off dead.

INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

ACT TWO (45 minutes)

Scene one: On the sound stages

As the unit director and his assistant quarrel, three silent films are being frantically made to better or worse effect.

Scene two: The Main Soundstage

The Movie Star (Prince Charming), carefully packaged in gold lamé, makes his grand entrance. But when rehearsals begin, he is appalled to find himself repeatedly pawed at by three deeply weird women: Cinderella’s stepsisters and that Stepmother. Nevertheless, the discouraged choreographer insists that rehearsals must begin. Then, under the Producer’s watchful eye, Cinderella makes an even grander entrance in slo-mo and proves, in her screen test, to be Ginger Rogers, Rita Hayworth, and Cyd Charisse all rolled into one.
During a break, a bevy of wannabe actresses “only waitressing for the moment” – and decked out in “sexy French maid” costumes — slink around and serve up oranges [musical joke: we hear the a reprise of the famous march from Prokofiev’s 1919 opera, “A Love for Three Oranges.”] The two sisters fiddle around with their fruit, hoping to redirect the star’s attention. But The Movie Star only has eyes for Cinderella, and nothing would mar the adorable couple’s happiness, were it not for the tick-tock of the chimes of midnight…

INTERMISSION (20 minutes)

ACT THREE (40 minutes)

Scene one: Los Angeles

The Movie Star, desperate to find his Cinderella, enlists all the male cast and crew in a search party. Like cowboys, the boys gallop off and try to find the girl who fits the shoe. They end up checking out the women at a series of Hollywood cliché locales: a) a tango/fandango/flamenco palace [Ugly Sister #1] b) a Chinese opium den [Ugly Sister #2] c) a Russian cabaret [the very perked-up Stepmother]. But their efforts are to no avail.

Scene two: back at the house

Cinderella, miserable, afraid of stardom yet so wearied of her present life, wonders if the last day had not been just a dream. But her living nightmare ends when the Movie Star arrives. Of course the shoe fits. But before she can dance off with her prince, she must sign the studio contract that the Producer waves before her eyes. Perhaps servitude to a studio is better than servitude to a stepfamily? In the end, all that really matters is that a prince charming loves you and dances divinely. Right?

Commentaires fermés sur A plot summary for Cendrillon (a.k.a. The ballet about Cinderella)

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

John Kriza, creator of the « romantic guy » in Fancy Free in 1944. Press photo.

Paris, Palais Garnier, November 6 and 13, 2018

FANCY FREE

Would the “too elegant dancers of Paris” – as American critics decry them – be able to “get down” and frolic their way through the so ‘merican Fancy Free? Would they know how to chew gum like da guys and play like wise-asses? Just who should be blamed for the cost of leasing this genre ballet from the Robbins Trust? If Robbins, who had delighted in staging so many of his ballets on the Paris company, had left this one to other companies for all these years…did he have a good reason?

On November 6th, the dancing, the acting, was not even “too elegant.” Everyone danced small. The ensemble’s focus was so low key that the ballet became lugubrious, weightless, charmless, an accumulation of pre-fab schtick. I have never paid more attention to what the steps are called, never spent the span of Fancy Free analyzing the phrases (oh yeah, this one ends with more double tours to the right) and groaning inwardly at all the “business.” First chewing gum scene? Invisible. Chomp the gum, guys! For the reprise, please don’t make it so ridiculously obvious that another three sticks were also hidden behind the lamppost by the stagehands. I have never said to myself: aha, let’s repeat “now we put our arms around each others’ shoulders and try hard to look like pals while not getting armpit sweat on each others’ costumes.” Never been so bored by unvaryingly slow double pirouettes and by the fake beers being so sloppily lifted that they clearly looked fake. The bar brawl? Lethargic and well nigh invisible (and I was in a place with good visibility).

Then the women. That scene where the girl with the red purse gets teased – an oddly wooden Alice Renavand — utterly lacked sass and became rather creepy and belligerent. As the dream girl in purple, Eleonora Abbagnato wafted a perfume of stiff poise. Ms. Purple proved inappropriately condescending and un-pliant: “I will now demonstrate the steps while wearing the costume of the second girl.“ She acted like a mildly amused tourist stuck in some random country. Karl Paquette had already been stranded by his male partners before he even tried to hit on this female: an over-interiorized Stéphane Bullion (who would nevertheless manage to hint at tiny little twinkles of humor in his tightly-wound rumba) and a François Alu emphatically devoted to defending his space. Face to face with the glacial Abbagnato, Paquette even gave up trying to make their duet sexy. This usually bright and alive dancing guy resigned himself to trying to salvage a limp turn around the floor by two very boring white people.

Then Aurelia Bellet sauntered in as the third girl –clearly amused that her wig was possessed by a character all on its own – and owned the joint. This girl would know how to snap her gum. I wanted the ballet to begin afresh.

A week later, on the 13th, the troops came ashore. Alessio Carbone (as the sailor who practically wants to split his pants in half), Paul Marque (really interesting as the dreamer: beautiful pliés anchored a legato unspooling of never predictable movement), and Alexandre Gasse (as a gleeful and carefree rumba guy) hit those buddy poses without leaving room for gusts of air to pass between them. Bounce and energy and humor came back into the streets of New York when they just tossed off those very tight Popeye flexes as little jokes, not poses, which is what they are supposed to be. The tap dancing riffs came off as natural, and you could practically hear them sayin’ “I wanna beer, I wanna girl.” Valentine Colasante radiated cool amusement and the infinite ways she reacted to every challenge in the “hand-off the big red purse” sequence established her alpha womanly dominance. Because of her subtle and reactive acting, there was not a creep in sight. Dorothée Gilbert, as the dame in purple, held on to the dreamy sweetness of the ballerina she’d already given in Robbins’s The Concert some years ago, and then took it forward. During the duet, she seemed to lead Marque, as acutely in tune with how to control a man’s reactions, as Colasante had just a few moments before. Sitting at the little table, watching the men peacock around, Gilbert’s body and face remained vivid and alive.

A SUITE OF DANCES

Sonia Wieder-Atherton concentrated deeply on her score and on her cello, emitting lovely sounds and offering a challenge to the dancing soloists. They were not going to get any of the kind of gimlet eye contact a Ma or a Rostropovich – or a rehearsal pianist – might have provided. On November 6th Matthias Heymann and on November 13th Hugo Marchand reacted to this absent but vibrating onstage presence in their own distinctive ways.

Heymann infused the falsely improvised aspect of the choreography with a sense of reminiscence. Sitting on the ground upstage and leaning back to look at her at the outset, you could feel he’d already just danced the thing one way. And we’d never see it. He’d dance it now differently, maybe in a more diffused manner. And, as he settled downstage at her feet once again at the end, you imagined how he would continue on and on, always the gentleman caller. Deeply rooted movement had spiraled out in an unending flow of elegant and deep inspiration, in spite of the musician who had ignored him. Strangely, this gave the audience the sense of being allowed to peek through a half-open studio door. We were witnessing a brilliant dancer whose body will never stop if music is around. Robbins should have called this piece “Isadora,” for it embodies all the principles the mother of modern dance called for: spontaneous and joyous movement engendered by opening up your ears and soul to how the music sings within you.

Heymann’s body is a pliant rectangle; Marchand’s a broad-shouldered triangle. Both types, I should point out, would fit perfectly into Leonardo’s outline of the Vitruvian Man. Where your center of gravity lies makes you move differently. The art is in learning how to use what nature has given you. If these two had been born in another time and place, I could see Merce Cunningham latching on to Heymann’s purity of motion and Paul Taylor eyeing the catch-me-if-you-dare quality of Marchand.

Marchard’s Suite proved as playful, as in and out and around the music while seeking how to fill this big empty stage as Heymann’s had, but with a bit more of the sense of a seagull wooing his reluctant cellist hen. Marchand seemed more intent upon wooing us as well, whereas Heymann had kept his eye riven on his private muse.

Both made me listen to Bach as if the music had just been composed for them, afresh.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

AFTERNOON OF A FAUN

It’s a hot sweaty day in a New York studio. A guy is stretching out all those ligaments, waiting for the next rehearsal or class. A freshly showered girl passes by the classroom door and pushes herself through that half-open studio door. Both – and this is such a dancer thing – are obsessed with how they look in the mirror…for better, for worse? When you are a young dancer, boy do you read into that studio mirror: who am I? Maybe I can like what I see? How can I make myself look better?

On the 6th, there was Marchand and here came Amandine Albisson. Albisson almost hissed “look at my shiny, shiny, new pointe shoes!” This may sound weird to say, but that little Joseph Cornell box of a set seemed too small for two such vibrant personas and for the potential of such shiny shoes. Both dancers aimed their movements out of and beyond that box in a never-ending flow of movement that kept catching the waves of Debussy’s sea of sound. The way that Marchand communicated that he could smell her fragrance. The way that fantastically taut and pliant horizontal lift seemed to surf. The way Albisson crisped up her fingers and wiggled them up through his almost embrace as if her arms were sails ready to catch the wind. The way he looked at her – “what, you don’t just exist in the mirror?” – right before he kissed her. It was a dream.

Unfortunately, Léonore Baulac and Germain Louvet do not necessarily a couple make, and the pair delivered a most awkward interpretation on the night of the 13th, complete with wobbly feet and wobbly hands in the partnering and the lifts were mostly so-so sort-of. Baulac danced dry and sharp and overemphatic – almost kicking her extensions – and Louvet just didn’t happen. Rapture and the way that time can stop when you are simply dancing for yourself, not for an audience quite yet, just didn’t happen either. I hope they were both just having an off night?

Afternoon of a Faun : Amandine Albisson et Hugo Marchand

GLASS PIECES

I had the same cast both nights, and I am furious. Who the hell told people – especially the atomic couples – to grin like sailors during the first movement? Believe me, if you smiled on New York’s streets back in 1983, you were either an idiot or a tourist.

But what really fuels my anger: the utter waste of Florian Magnenet in the central duet, dancing magnificently, and pushing his body as if his arms were thrusting through the thick hot humidity of Manhattan summer air. He reached out from deep down in his solar plexus and branched out his arms towards his partner as if to rescue her from an onrushing subway train and…Sae Eun Park placed her hand airlessly in the proper position, as she has for years now. Would some American company please whisk her out of here? She’s cookie-cutter efficient, but I’ll be damned if I would call her elegant. Elegance comes from a deep place. It’s thoughtful and weighty and imparts a rich sense of history and identity. It’s not about just hitting the marks. Elegance comes from the inside out. It cannot be faked from the outside in.

Commentaires fermés sur Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins: hommage demi-portion

Hommage à Jerome Robbins, Opéra de Paris, 30 octobre et 2 novembre 

Le fantôme de Millepied hanterait-il l’Opéra de Paris ?  La soirée « Hommage à Jerome Robbins » lorgne délibérément vers New York. Délaissant En Sol, In the Night et Dances at a Gathering, présentées deux ou trois fois à Garnier ces quinze dernières années, mais oubliant aussi The Four Seasons (pièce dansée lors de la saison 1995-1996, et plus jamais depuis) ou le silencieux Moves, la programmation marque l’entrée au répertoire de Fancy Free (1944), création inaugurale de Robbins.

En voilà une fausse bonne idée. Les petits malins de la direction de la danse ont peut-être pensé faire d’une pierre deux coups, avec un discret clin d’œil au centenaire de Leonard Bernstein, mais Garnier n’est pas Broadway, et l’Opéra de Paris n’est pas le NYCB. Incarnés par Alessio Carbone, Paul Marque et Alexandre Gasse, les trois marins en goguette à Manhattan sont précis et musicaux ; ils ont manifestement potassé mimiques et pantomime (et côté filles, Valentine Colasante nous sert aussi toutes les mines qu’il faut en danseuse au sac rouge), mais ça fait un peu plaqué. Question de style. Lors de la séquence « dance off », chacun se coule dans son moule – Carbone est ostentatoire, Marque glissé et Gasse chaloupé –, mais ça reste élégant et trop contrôlé (30 octobre et 2 novembre). J’ai encore en mémoire la prestation jubilatoire des danseurs de l’ABT en 2007 au Châtelet ; ils avaient l’air d’exploser de vitalité. Et il suffit de regarder quelques secondes Baryschnikov dans la variation du « 2nd sailor »  pour voir ce qui fait défaut à nos jolis danseurs parisiens (la prise de risque dans les glissés, le feint déséquilibre dû à l’ivresse, la niaise juvénilité).

Quand je serai dictateur, Aurélie Dupont devra me rendre raison du sous-emploi à quoi elle a réduit Dorothée Gilbert en ce début de saison. La donzelle sait tout faire, y compris un rôle à talons, mais le pas de deux avec Paul Marque manque totalement de sensualité (a contrario, voir la tension entre les deux danseurs du NYCB dans un court extrait de répétition).

La soirée continue avec Suites of Dances, où François Alu étonne. Ce danseur a l’art de raconter des histoires, et il nous en donne par poignées. On a l’impression d’un livre ouvert : tout est lisible, finement accentué. Épaulements, sautes d’humeur, nonchalance et espièglerie, bras expressifs et mains libérées. Alu a peut-être un peu moins d’affinité avec le troisième mouvement, d’essence nocturne, mais la maturité de l’interprète éclate (30 octobre). Dans le même rôle, Paul Marque a une danse très fluide (Alu donne l’impression de découper l’air, Marque de s’y couler), encore un peu scolaire (on voit un danseur plus qu’un personnage), tout en emportant le morceau dans l’accélération finale (2 novembre).

Après l’entracte, Afternoon of a faun réunit Mathias Heymann, très félin, et Myriam Ould-Braham, apparition aux lignes de rêve (30 octobre). Germain Louvet et Léonore Baulac, aux lignes également idéales, sont davantage humains qu’animaux (2 novembre). Dans Glass Pieces, seule pièce à effectif de la soirée (cherchez l’erreur!), on est emporté par la classe des trois couples du premier mouvement (Charline Giezendanner et Simon Valastro, Caroline Robert et Allister Madin, Séverine Westermann et Sébastien Bertaud, 2 novembre). Avec Laura Hecquet et Stéphane Bullion, l’adage semble manquer de tension, et – l’avouerai-je ? – le tambour du dernier mouvement me tape sur le système.

4 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Naharin : le ballet de l’Opéra en Decadance

«Decadance», Chorégraphie Ohad Naharin, divers compositeurs (musiques enregistrées). Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Palais Garnier. Représentation du 9 octobre 2018.

Reconnaissons tout d’abord une certaine logique à la programmation de ce début de saison dansée à l’Opéra de Paris. Celle-ci a débuté par la Martha Graham Dance Company avec une danseuse invitée de l’Opéra (son actuelle directrice) et une courte chorégraphie, plutôt réussie, par un danseur maison (Nicolas Paul). La saison du ballet de la compagnie nationale ouvre ensuite sa propre saison avec l’entrée au répertoire d’une pièce du chorégraphe israélien Ohad Naharin, directeur artistique de la Batsheva Dance Company, à l’origine spécialisée dans le répertoire Graham. Si «Decadance» n’est pas la première pièce de Naharin qui entre au répertoire (il y eut jadis «Perpetuum» au début des années 2000), c’est la première fois qu’une soirée entière lui est dédié.

La pièce elle-même est un pot-pourri. Le concept a été lancé en 2000 (au même moment où Jiri Kylian présentait sur le même principe son « Arcimboldo ») et a perduré sur le mode évolutif ; aujourd’hui, « Decadance » égrène des chorégraphies créées entre 1992 et 2011. Pour autant, on ne se retrouve pas devant une simple addition d’extraits. « Three », œuvre complète présentée en 2016 par la Batsheva sur la scène de Garnier et dont des extraits de la dernière section clôturent la soirée, n’offrait guère plus de cohérence narrative que « Decadance ». Ce qui fait le lien, c’est le subtil va-et-vient des humeurs dont le spectre oscille de la gravité au bouffon en passant par le poétique.

On ne peut s’empêcher d’admirer la fraicheur sans cesse renouvelée de la section « participative » de « Minus 16 » (au répertoire de plusieurs compagnies internationales) où les danseurs invitent les spectateurs les plus colorés de l’Orchestre à un moment de danse improvisée. Toujours extrait de « Minus 16 », la grande transe sur l’arc de chaises, avec ses secousses telluriques et ses chants obsédants nous a, cette fois-ci, moins évoqué un rituel religieux  qu’une théorie d’hirondelles (une espèce menacée) nous découvrant leur poitrail blanc. Le danseur « chutant » semblait être un oisillon tombé du nid. Car même lorsqu’on n’est pas directement convié à prendre part au spectacle, on se retrouve toujours conduit à créer sa propre narration, produit des émotions suscitée par le mouvement.

Dans « Decadance », on admire les sections d’adages en première partie qui s’organisent parfois en groupes statuaires. Ils convoquent les Bourgeois de Calais de Rodin ou bien les Trois Grâces antiques. Quatre danseurs au sol qui lentement, par basculement du bassin, vont de cours à jardin, convoquent quelques personnages facétieux de Keith Haring. On distingue aussi un beau duo sur le Nisi Dominus de Vivaldi où un garçon remue le poing en direction d’une fille. Les moulinets du poignet évoquent les affres de la mauvaise conscience. Mais la fille semble n’en avoir cure. Ondoyant avec la grâce d’un arc électrique, elle évite tout impact.

La danse chez Naharin démarre le plus souvent à partir d’un motif très simple, comme ces ports de bras en « seconde » auxquels tous les danseurs, de face au public, impriment des positions angulaires (coudes et paumes des mains orientés vers le sol, poignets cassés )  de  « courbes statistiques ». Les bras s’allongent presque imperceptiblement comme agités par de petites secousses telluriques. Mais le chorégraphe demande ensuite à ses danseurs des variations personnelles sur ce canevas.

La grande question de cette série de soirée n’était pas en vérité de savoir si le chorégraphe Ohah Naharin avait du talent ou pas, car la réponse est évidente depuis longtemps mais si les danseurs de l’Opéra allaient savoir embrasser son style somme toute assez éloigné de leur langue maternelle. L’expérience est concluante. Chacun se coule à son rythme dans cette technique. Les sauts dont les impulsions semblent partir de nulle part sont certes inégalement maîtrisés mais les corps se montrent et s’individualisent. Hugo Vigliotti introduit dans sa danse aux bras en « courbe statistique » des cliquetis du cou qui attirent le regard. Pablo Legasa devient une liane décorative. Caroline Osmont joue sur le fil entre grande bourgeoise un peu lointaine et nymphette un soupçon aguicheuse. Et on s’émerveille de voir la diversité des morphologies de ces interprètes trop souvent présentés par les détracteurs du ballet comme uniformes. Les grands « quicks » que les danseurs effectuent à la fin se font avec des pieds aux cambrures qui trahissent le danseur classique. Mais ces battements n’ont rien de l’acrobatie désincarné. On se donne, au passage, des coups de langue sur les genoux des plus impudiques. L’école est là, mais loin d’être une limitation, elle est un instrument de liberté.

C’est ainsi qu’on ressort heureux de la grande boutique.

Commentaires fermés sur Naharin : le ballet de l’Opéra en Decadance

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

La Fille mal gardée : deux dernières pour la route et bilan

La Fille mal gardée. Soirée du 10 juillet. Saluts.

La série des « Fille mal gardée » s’est achevée le 14 juillet à l’occasion d’une représentation non ouverte au public régulier. Entre temps, les Balletotos avaient complété leur bouquet de distributions. Le 10 juillet, Cléopold allait découvrir le couple Baulac-Marque et le 11, Fenella allait se régaler de la communion dansée du couple majuscule de l’Opéra, Myriam Ould-Braham et Mathias Heymann.
Voici leurs impressions respectives.

*

 *                                                 *

Cléopold : représentation du 11 juillet 2018. Léonore Baulac, Paul Marque, Mallory Gaudion, Axel Magliano.

Mis au défi par un de nos insolents rédacteurs sur les réseaux sociaux lors de mon dernier article, je commencerai par vous parler de la volaille. Au soir du 10 juillet, le coq (Jack Gasztowtt), entouré de sa basse-cour dans la charmante scène d’ouverture de La fille mal gardée nous a transporté un instant dans la scène d’ouverture de Singing in The Rain où Don Lockwod explique à une foule énamourée ses débuts dans le show-biz. Le procédé comique de cette scène réside dans le décalage entre le récit doré de l’acteur (« Dignity, Dignity, always dignity ! ») et les images de ses débuts sur des théâtres improbables et dans des saynettes loufoques (et diablement bien réglées). Le petit numéro de tap dance de monsieur Gasztowtt avait cette grâce un peu absurde et a fait rire la salle de bon cœur.

En cette fin de série, un des intérêts de cette représentation était de voir dans le corps de ballet, à l’instar de Jack Gasztowtt, quantité de têtes inhabituelles. L’essentiel des effectifs de la troupe – le Crystal Pite étant, oh combien, consommateur de gambettes – était parti en tournée à Novosibirsk.

Deux autres sujets de contentement étaient les prestations de deux nouveaux venus dans les rôles de Mère Simone et d’Alain. Elles prouvaient, une fois encore, combien le ballet d’Ashton est à classer dans la catégorie des chefs-d’œuvre offrant de multiples options d’interprétation aux artistes. Impossible en effet d’imaginer rendus du texte original plus différents de ceux de Simon Valastro et Adrien Couvez (le 27/06) que ceux choisis par Mallaury Gaudion et Axel Magliano en cette soirée du 10 juillet. Gaudion-Simone joue à fond la carte du travesti. Sa mère Simone est une drag queen délicieusement déjantée qui maîtrise son burlesque avec une précision diabolique (on pense notamment à son effondrement, les quatre fers en l’air, à l’ouverture de la porte découvrant Lise et Colas enlacés). A l’inverse de Couvez, dont une grande part du charme repose sur ses mimiques, Axel Magliano, avec son visage inexpressif comme celui d’une poupée de porcelaine, portraiture un adorable pantin désarticulé (doté, on ne s’en plaint pas, d’un très beau ballon). Ces deux interprétations de mère Simone et d’Alain, sans doute un peu plus extérieures, moins émouvantes, fonctionnaient cependant parfaitement.

Pour ce qui est du couple principal, l’expérience est moins probante. Léonore Baulac sera sans doute dans l’avenir une excellente Lise. Elle est très fraîche avec une pantomime claire et vive. Ses mimiques de dispute avec Mère Simone sont drôles et elle fait claquer le ruban sur le postérieur de son Colas-canasson avec ardeur. Mais il lui faudra abandonner cette tendance qu’elle a développé, depuis qu’elle est étoile, de vouloir à tout prix montrer qu’elle atteint les critères techniques exigés par ses rôles en forçant les positions : dans sa variation Elssler, certaines d’entre-elles sont tellement marquées qu’elles font ressembler la danseuse à un automate.

Paul Marque, en Colas, est plutôt satisfaisant dans le jeu, mais, mis à part sa grande variation de la scène deux de l’acte 1, exécutée avec suffisamment de brio, on regrette quantité de petits vasouillages mineurs (réajustements de positions, pirouettes non tenues…) qui font sortir du ballet. Au premier acte, le danseur n’est vraiment intéressant que lorsqu’il danse avec sa partenaire (ce qui, je le concède, n’est déjà pas mal) : son solo aux bouteilles devant le rideau d’avant-scène frôle l’insipidité. Paul Marque, récemment promu premier danseur, a dansé comme un honnête et timide sujet. Tout talentueux qu’il soit, il aurait pu encore attendre une saison ou deux dans le corps de ballet afin de gagner en solidité technique et en subtilité du partenariat.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

*

 *                                                 *

July 11, 2018 : Myriam Ould-Braham, Mathias Heymann, Alexis Renaud.

The Paris management has long clung to refusing Sibley/Dowell-like partnerships. Yes, couples can grow stale. But couples can grow too, through experience, to the point of perfect symbiosis. Going in, I had thought I’d oohed at Myriam Ould-Braham and Mathias Heymann together often enough. It couldn’t get any better. But the pair keeps working on its onstage relationship – the way they look at each other! — and nothing could have been more natural and warm than the flow of this technically-impeccable performance. The shy gazelle-like arch of the nape of her neck, her tendrilled arms, and the tender and  stretched way he opened his chest and épaulement to her, to us, and to those on stage, infused everything .  Their partnering was a miracle of easy banter – the trickiest thing to control and project without seeming to. This duo brought to mind that of William Powell and Myrna Loy in 1934’s classic black and white movie about a couple, swift and sleek, just made for each other, “The Thin Man.” [Minus the sarcasm].Every arm in an arabesque reached towards its object, every attitude turn sought to pull in the other even more strongly than the ribbons. Heymann even hugged one of the startled chickens, the way Powell once casually and lovingly pulled the dog Asta into his arms.  In both cases, the animal was near enough to his woman to be the most precious thing around.

So as in the Thin Man: silky ease. “I really don’t have to worry about this anymore. We’ve been playing at these silly one-armed lifts in the barnyard since we were six, after all.”  Each gets energy from the other, and you never have that moment when you see one or the other go “oof, we got the hard part out of the way, so now I can concentrate my own stuff.”  I confess, I stopped thinking about how to describe the steps or to take notes, and just wallowed in the moment like a teenager at the movies, totally absorbed, incapable of critical distance.

A final note must be devoted to the supporting actor Alexis Renaud, who put a lifetime of stage smarts into his debut as yet another of the vivacious Mother Simones we were lucky enough to see this season.  (And it would be his swan song since he would retire from both the role and the company only three days later).  The haughty chic and nonchalence of the clog dance – and the street-smarts that slipped out when she defended Alain from the Rooster — made me wonder whether this mother hen incarnation of Ashton’s “Widow” Simone didn’t know more about the birds and bees than she was letting on.

*

 *                                                 *

Au total, voilà donc une série un peu décevante qui montre les limites du casting « tout soliste » de l’actuelle direction puisque seul le couple de « vétérans » a su pleinement satisfaire aux exigences du ballet. Dorothée Gilbert ne s’accordait pas nécessairement très bien aux qualités de Germain Louvet, de même que le couple Renavand-Alu n’évoluait pas dans le même registre. Etait-il pertinent de distribuer une récente étoilée encore en recherche de sa réelle personnalité avec un premier danseur trop vert (Baulac-Marque) ? Voilà des problèmes qui resteront sans doute sans résolution, la direction actuelle n’étant pas connue pour sa capacité à se remettre en question.

1 commentaire

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

La Fille mal gardée : coquette paysanne cherche petit marquis

Le Coq (Milo Avèque)

La Fille mal gardée (Ashton/Herold). Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Palais Garnier. Représentation du mercredi 27 juin 2018.

La Fille mal gardée, un des piliers actuels du répertoire du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris depuis son introduction en 2007, est un ballet étonnant. On peste un peu à l’annonce d’une nouvelle saison lorsqu’on le retrouve inscrit au mois de juillet – « encore ! » – mais on prend tout de même des billets. Et à la revoyure, c’est toujours le même enchantement. Il y a un mystère indéfinissable dans les pièces de génie, qui leur donne non pas tant une jeunesse éternelle qu’un esthétique intemporelle. Ici, on connaît toutes les surprises, tous les gags et pourtant on les goûte toujours avec un plaisir renouvelé. Les coquetteries de ruban, les parapluies igloo, les cocottes atrabilaires ou les mèches de cheveux récalcitrantes, tout se fond dans la belle technique post-Bournonvilienne en un tout harmonieux et jubilatoire.

Lors de la dernière reprise, en 2015, Benjamin Millepied, alors directeur de la Danse, avait joué la carte de la jeunesse. De nombreux espoirs de la compagnie avaient pu s’essayer aux rôles de Lise et de Colas. Ce n’est pas la vision de l’actuelle directrice qui a décidé de s’appuyer sur la hiérarchie. Les distributions de cette Fille sont donc très largement « étoilées ». Las ! Les blessures qui semblaient s’être raréfiées depuis la direction éclair de Millepied se sont réinvitées à la fête, nécessitant un jeu de chaises musicales.

La distribution du 27 juin est à ce titre exemplaire. Dorothée Gilbert, créatrice du rôle à l’Opéra mais qui l’avait lâché après la reprise de 2009, a dû reprendre du service. Elle devait danser avec François Alu. On s’en réjouissait. Mais entre temps, Hugo Marchand, qui devait danser la première avec Alice Renavand s’était blessé, Alu commis à le remplacer et Germain Louvet, non prévu au départ, appelé à la rescousse pour servir de partenaire à Dorothée Gilbert.

On ne pouvait imaginer pairage plus radicalement différent. Alors qu’en est-il ?

La Lise de Dorothée Gilbert est pleine de qualités. Elle est plus naturelle, moins « technicienne » sans doute qu’il y a 10 ans. Mais sa danse manque un peu de glacis, notamment dans sa variation « Elssler » durant la scène 2 de l’acte 1. C’est finalement  Myriam Ould-Braham qui aura imprimé sa marque à ce rôle à l’Opéra.

Le partenariat avec Germain Louvet demande encore à être travaillé. Dans le porté répété deux fois dans le ballet où Colas porte Lise à bout de bras, l’arabesque de Dorothée Gilbert reste un peu chiche, comme si les deux danseurs n’avaient pas trouvé le bon point d’équilibre. La pose finale du grand pas de deux « Fanny Elssler » (Lise saute sur l’épaule de Colas) est manquée.

Le danseur, avec sa ligne superbe et ses sauts aisés, n’a pas nécessairement le gabarit qui convient pour les variations de Colas, conçues pour des danseurs plus compacts (notamment les petits pas de bourrée Bournonville et les pirouettes achevées par un fouetté en 4e devant). Il dépeint un paysan très « hameau de la reine ». On a du mal à prendre au sérieux ce joli aristocrate lorsqu’il débouche des bouteilles de pinard avec les dents. Cela fait néanmoins sourire. Mais, en dépit de petites tensions – presque imperceptibles – au début avec le charmant mais redoutable jeu des rubans, le danseur a déjà plein de bonnes idées dramatiques. Il parvient, juché dans la grange, à attirer l’attention pendant la querelle Lise-Mère Simone.

Le couple met un peu de temps à se former mais il trouve finalement toute sa réalisation à l’acte 2. La pantomime d’hymen de Gilbert est charmante et l’irruption de Colas s’extrayant des bottes de paille est bien minutée. Louvet donne la réplique avec beaucoup d’esprit (« 3 enfants? 10 si tu veux »!). Le bras tendu de Lise, faussement éplorée, fait rire de bon cœur la salle. Après cela, le pas de deux final, très « Sylphide » de Taglioni, coule comme de l’eau de source.

Dorothée Gilbert et Germain Louvet (Lise et Colas).

On passe donc un très agréable moment. D’autant que les seconds rôles ne sont pas en reste.

Simon Valastro. Mère Simone.

Après nous avoir enchanté des années dans le rôle d’Alain, Simon Valastro s’essaie avec succès au rôle de Mère-Simone. Il joue avec sa perruque portée un peu haut sur le front avec deux chignons de côté qui s’agitent. Sa silhouette est considérablement augmentée par ses jupes qui lui donnent un aspect plus large que haut. Sa Mère Simone se déhanche ainsi d’une manière inénarrable. Simon-Simone fesse et claque allégrement sa fifille qui, en retour, étrangle au rouet sa maternelle avec délectation. Adrien Couvez retrouve le rôle d’Alain avec succès. Il est délicieusement cucul-la-praline. Il accomplit deux montées-dévalements d’escalier au timing parfait, hilarants et … musicaux. Alexandre Carniato portraiture un père Alain bourru, conscient de la stupidité de son fils mais le défendant comme une poule son poussin (le contrat déchiré d’un coup de canne). Le notaire et son clerc (Francesco Vantaggio et Léo de Busseroles) ont également un bon sens du minutage. Ils attirent l’attention sur deux rôles mineurs qui passent habituellement assez inaperçus à l’Opéra.

Aviez-vous encore besoin de bonnes raisons pour vous laisser tenter par la Fille mal gardée ?

Adrien Couvez. Alain

3 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique