Archives de Tag: Mathieu Ganio

Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

The extended apron thrust forward across where the orchestra should have been gave many seats at the Palais Garnier – already not renowned for visibility — scant sightlines unless you were in a last row and could stand up and tilt forward. Were these two “it’s a gala/not a gala” programs worth attending? Yes and/or no.

Evening  Number One: “Nureyev” on Thursday, October 8, at the Palais Garnier.

Nureyev’s re-thinkings of the relationship between male and female dancers always seek to tweak the format of the male partner up and out from glorified crane operator into that of race car driver. But that foot on the gas was always revved up by a strong narrative context.

Nutcracker pas de deux Acts One and Two

Gilbert generously offers everything to a partner and the audience, from her agile eyes through her ever-in-motion and vibrantly tensile body. A street dancer would say “the girlfriend just kills it.” Her boyfriend for this series, Paul Marque, first needs to learn how to live.

At the apex of the Act II pas of Nuts, Nureyev inserts a fiendishly complex and accelerating airborne figure that twice ends in a fish dive, of course timed to heighten a typically overboard Tchaikovsky crescendo. Try to imagine this: the stunt driver is basically trying to keep hold of the wheel of a Lamborghini with a mind of its own that suddenly goes from 0 to 100, has decided to flip while doing a U-turn, and expects to land safe and sound and camera-ready in the branches of that tree just dangling over the cliff.  This must, of course, be meticulously rehearsed even more than usual, as it can become a real hot mess with arms, legs, necks, and tutu all in getting in the way.  But it’s so worth the risk and, even when a couple messes up, this thing can give you “wow” shivers of delight and relief. After “a-one-a-two-a-three,” Marque twice parked Gilbert’s race car as if she were a vintage Trabant. Seriously: the combination became unwieldy and dull.

Marque continues to present everything so carefully and so nicely: he just hasn’t shaken off that “I was the best student in the class “ vibe. But where is the urge to rev up?  Smiling nicely just doesn’t do it, nor does merely getting a partner around from left to right. He needs to work on developing a more authoritative stage presence, or at least a less impersonal one.

 

Cendrillon

A ballerina radiating just as much oomph and chic and and warmth as Dorothée Gilbert, Alice Renavand grooved and spun wheelies just like the glowing Hollywood starlet of Nureyev’s cinematic imagination.  If Renavand “owned” the stage, it was also because she was perfectly in synch with a carefree and confident Florian Magnenet, so in the moment that he managed to make you forget those horrible gold lamé pants.

 

Swan Lake, Act 1

Gently furling his ductile fingers in order to clasp the wrists of the rare bird that continued to astonish him, Audric Bezard also (once again) demonstrated that partnering can be so much more than “just stand around and be ready to lift the ballerina into position, OK?” Here we had what a pas is supposed to be about: a dialogue so intense that it transcends metaphor.

You always feel the synergy between Bezard and Amandine Albisson. Twice she threw herself into the overhead lift that resembles a back-flip caught mid-flight. Bezard knows that this partner never “strikes a pose” but instead fills out the legato, always continuing to extend some part her movements beyond the last drop of a phrase. His choice to keep her in movement up there, her front leg dangerously tilting further and further over by miniscule degrees, transformed this lift – too often a “hoist and hold” more suited to pairs skating – into a poetic and sincere image of utter abandon and trust. The audience held its breath for the right reason.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Manfred

Bewildered, the audience nevertheless applauded wildly at the end of this agonized and out of context solo. Pretending to themselves they had understood, the audience just went with the flow of the seasoned dancer-actor. Mathias Heymann gave the moment its full dose of “ah me” angst and defied the limits of the little apron stage [these are people used to eating up space the size of a football field].

Pas de deux can mostly easily be pulled out of context and presented as is, since the theme generally gravitates from “we two are now falling in love,” and “yes, we are still in love,” to “hey, guys, welcome to our wedding!” But I have doubts about the point of plunging both actor and audience into an excerpt that lacks a shared back-story. Maybe you could ask Juliet to do the death scene a capella. Who doesn’t know the “why” of that one? But have most of us ever actually read Lord Byron, much less ever heard of this Manfred? The program notes that the hero is about to be reunited by Death [spelled with a capital “D”] with his beloved Astarté. Good to know.

Don Q

Francesco Mura somehow manages to bounce and spring from a tiny unforced plié, as if he just changed his mind about where to go. But sometimes the small preparation serves him less well. Valentine Colasante is now in a happy and confident mind-set, having learned to trust her body. She now relaxes into all the curves with unforced charm and easy wit.

R & J versus Sleeping Beauty’s Act III

In the Balcony Scene with Miriam Ould-Braham, Germain Louvet’s still boyish persona perfectly suited his Juliet’s relaxed and radiant girlishness. But then, when confronted by Léonore Baulac’s  Beauty, Louvet once again began to seem too young and coltish. It must hard make a connection with a ballerina who persists in exteriorizing, in offering up sharply-outlined girliness. You can grin hard, or you can simply smile.  Nothing is at all wrong with Baulac’s steely technique. If she could just trust herself enough to let a little bit of the air out of her tires…She drives fast but never stops to take a look at the landscape.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

As the Beatles once sang a very, very, long time ago:

 « Baby, you can drive my car
Yes, I’m gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I’ll love you »

Evening Two: “Etoiles.”  Tuesday, October 13, 2020.

We were enticed back to the Palais Garnier for a thing called “Etoiles {Stars] de l’Opera,” where the program consisted of…anything and everything in a very random way.  (Plus a bit of live music!)

Clair de lune by Alistair Marriott (2017) was announced in the program as a nice new thing. Nice live Debussy happened, because the house pianist Elena Bonnay, just like the best of dancers, makes all music fill out an otherwise empty space.

Mathieu Ganio, sporting a very pretty maxi-skort, opened his arms sculpturally, did a few perfect plies à la seconde, and proffered up a few light contractions. At the end, all I could think of was Greta Garbo’s reaction to her first kiss in the film Ninochka: “That was…restful.”  Therefore:

Trois Gnossiennes, by Hans van Manen and way back from 1982, seemed less dated by comparison.  The same plié à la seconde, a few innie contractions, a flexed foot timed to a piano chord for no reason whatever, again. Same old, eh? Oddly, though, van Manen’s pure and pensive duet suited  Ludmila Paglerio and Hugo Marchand as  prettily as Marriott’s had for Ganio. While Satie’s music breathes at the same spaced-out rhythm as Debussy’s, it remains more ticklish. Noodling around in an  absinth-colored but lucid haze, this oddball composer also knew where he was going. I thought of this restrained little pas de deux as perhaps “Balanchine’s Apollo checks out a fourth muse.”  Euterpe would be my choice. But why not Urania?

And why wasn’t a bit of Kylian included in this program? After all, Kylain has historically been vastly more represented in the Paris Opera Ballet’s repertoire than van Manen will ever be.

The last time I saw Martha Graham’s Lamentation, Miriam Kamionka — parked into a side corridor of the Palais Garnier — was really doing it deep and then doing it over and over again unto exhaustion during  yet another one of those Boris Charmatz events. Before that stunt, maybe I had seen the solo performed here by Fanny Gaida during the ‘90’s. When Sae-Un Park, utterly lacking any connection to her solar plexus, had finished demonstrating how hard it is to pull just one tissue out of a Kleenex box while pretending it matters, the audience around me couldn’t even tell when it was over and waited politely for the lights to go off  and hence applaud. This took 3.5 minutes from start to end, according to the program.

Then came the duet from William Forsythe’s Herman Schmerman, another thingy that maybe also had entered into the repertoire around 2017. Again: why this one, when so many juicy Forsythes already belong to us in Paris? At first I did not remember that this particular Forsythe invention was in fact a delicious parody of “Agon.” It took time for Hannah O’Neill to get revved up and to finally start pushing back against Vincent Chaillet. Ah, Vincent Chaillet, forceful, weightier, and much more cheerfully nasty and all-out than I’d seen him for quite a while, relaxed into every combination with wry humor and real groundedness. He kept teasing O’Neill: who is leading, eh? Eh?! Yo! Yow! Get on up, girl!

I think that for many of us, the brilliant Ida Nevasayneva of the Trocks (or another Trock! Peace be with you, gals) kinda killed being ever to watch La Mort du cygne/Dying Swan without desperately wanting to giggle at even the idea of a costume decked with feathers or that inevitable flappy arm stuff. Despite my firm desire to resist, Ludmila Pagliero’s soft, distilled, un-hysterical and deeply dignified interpretation reconciled me to this usually overcooked solo.  No gymnastic rippling arms à la Plisetskaya, no tedious Russian soul à la Ulanova.  Here we finally saw a really quietly sad, therefore gut-wrenching, Lamentation. Pagliero’s approach helped me understand just how carefully Michael Fokine had listened to our human need for the aching sound of a cello [Ophélie Gaillard, yes!] or a viola, or a harp  — a penchant that Saint-Saens had shared with Tchaikovsky. How perfectly – if done simply and wisely by just trusting the steps and the Petipa vibe, as Pagliero did – this mini-epic could offer a much less bombastic ending to Swan Lake.

Suite of Dances brought Ophélie Gaillard’s cello back up downstage for a face to face with Hugo Marchand in one of those “just you and me and the music” escapades that Jerome Robbins had imagined a long time before a “platform” meant anything less than a stage’s wooden floor.  I admit I had preferred the mysterious longing Mathias Heymann had brought to the solo back in 2018 — especially to the largo movement. Tonight, this honestly jolly interpretation, infused with a burst of “why not?” energy, pulled me into Marchand’s space and mindset. Here was a guy up there on stage daring to tease you, me, and oh yes the cellist with equally wry amusement, just as Baryshnikov once had dared.  All those little jaunty summersaults turn out to look even cuter and sillier on a tall guy. The cocky Fancy Free sailor struts in part four were tossed off in just the right way: I am and am so not your alpha male, but if you believe anything I’m sayin’, we’re good to go.

The evening wound down with a homeopathic dose of Romantic frou-frou, as we were forced to watch one of those “We are so in love. Yes, we are still in love” out of context pas de deux, This one was extracted from John Neumeier’s La Dame aux Camélias.

An ardent Mathieu Ganio found himself facing a Laura Hecquet devoted to smoothing down her fluffy costume and stiff hair. When Neumeier’s pas was going all horizontal and swoony, Ganio gamely kept replacing her gently onto her pointes as if she deserved valet parking.  But unlike, say, Anna Karina leaning dangerously out of her car to kiss Belmondo full throttle in Pierrot le Fou, Hecquet simply refused to hoist herself even one millimeter out of her seat for the really big lifts. She was dead weight, and I wanted to scream. Unlike almost any dancer I have ever seen, Hecquet still persists in not helping her co-driver. She insists on being hoisted and hauled around like a barrel. Partnering should never be about driving the wrong way down a one-way street.

Commentaires fermés sur Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Ballet de l’Opéra: l’art du passe-partout

Soirée du 13 octobre

Le programme néoclassique présenté à Garnier, sottement et faussement intitulé Étoiles de l’Opéra – sottement parce qu’un rang hiérarchique dans une distribution ne fait pas un projet, et faussement parce qu’on trouve, dans le lot, trois premiers danseurs – aligne paresseusement : deux entrées au répertoire de 2017 (Trois Gnossiennes d’Hans van Manen, le pas de deux d’Herman Schmerman de William Forsythe), deux reprises de la saison 2018/2019 (A suite of Dances de Robbins, un extrait de La Dame aux camélias), et deux pièces de gala également revues récemment (Lamentation de Graham, mobilisée par 20 danseurs pour le XXe siècle de Boris Charmatz il y a cinq ans, et La Mort du cygne de Fokine, présentée à l’occasion du mini-gala Chauviré). Seule nouveauté en ces lieux, le Clair de lune d’Alastair Marriott (2017) semble fait pour magnifier les qualités et la plastique de Mathieu Ganio, mais peine à élever sa nécessité au niveau du clair-obscur liquide de la musique de Debussy. À peine la pièce vue, tout ce dont j’étais capable de me souvenir était : « il me faut ce pantalon, idéalement aéré pour la touffeur des fonds de loge. »

Trois Gnossiennes réunit – comme la dernière fois – Ludmila Pagliero et Hugo Marchand, et on se dit – comme la dernière fois – qu’ils sont un peu trop déliés et élégants pour cet exercice de style. Et puis, vers le milieu du deuxième mouvement, on s’avise de leurs mains toutes plates, et on se laisse gagner par leur prestation imperturbable, leur interprétation comme blanche d’intention, presque mécanique – je t’attrape par la bottine, tu développes ton arabesque en l’air, n’allons pas chercher du sens.

Sae Eun Park exécute Lamentation sans y apporter une once d’épaisseur. On a l’impression de voir une image. Pas un personnage qui aurait des entrailles. Les jeux d’ombre autour du banc finissent par retenir davantage l’attention. Quand vient le pas de deux si joueur d’Herman Schmerman, l’œil frisote à nouveau pour les danseurs, mais l’interaction entre Hannah O’Neil et Vincent Chaillet manque un peu de piment ; c’est dommage, car le premier danseur est remarquable de style, alliant la bonne dose d’explosivité et de chewing-gummitude tant dans son solo que durant le finale en jupette jaune.

Ludmila Pagliero propose de jolies choses : son cygne donne l’air de lutter contre la mort, plus que de s’y résigner. Il y a, vers la fin, comme la résistance d’un dos blessé. Mais je vois plus l’intelligence dramatique de la ballerine qu’un véritable oiseau.

À ma grande surprise, dans A suite of Dances, Hugo Marchand me laisse sur le bord du chemin. Je le trouve trop élégant et altier dans ce rôle en pyjama rouge où se mêlent danse de caractère, désinvolture, jazzy et cabotinage. Mon érudit voisin Cléopold me souffle que l’interprète a l’intelligence de faire autre chose que du Barychnikov, et peut-être ai-je mauvais goût, mais le côté Mitteleuropa meets Broadway,  entre caractère et histrionisme, me semble consubstantiel à l’œuvre, et mal accordé aux facilités et au physique de l’étoile Marchand. Il y a deux ans, François Alu m’avait bien plus convaincant, tant dans l’ironie que dans l’introspection quasi-dépressive. J’ai eu le sentiment que Marchand n’était pas fait pour ce rôle (ça arrive : Jessye Norman n’était pas une Carmen), mais c’est peut-être parce qu’il ne correspond pas à ma conception du violoncelle, que je vois comme un instrument terrien, au son dense et au grain serré, douloureux par éclats.

La soirée se termine avec Mathieu Ganio en Armand et Laura Hecquet en camélia blanc à froufrous dans le pas de deux dit de la campagne. Ce passage, qui n’est véritablement touchant qu’inséré dans  une narration d’ensemble, enchaîne les portés compliqués – dont certains se révèlent ici laborieux, d’autant que la robe s’emmêle. Les moments les plus réussis sont ceux du soudain rapprochement amoureux (déboulé déboulé déboulé par terre, et hop, bisou !). Si Ganio est un amoureux tout uniment ravi, Laura Hecquet fait ressentir la gratitude de son personnage face à un amour inespéré pour elle. Sa Marguerite a comme conscience de la fragilité de son existence.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

1 commentaire

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Les Balletos-d’or 2019-2020

Avouons que nous avons hésité. Depuis quelques semaines, certains nous suggéraient de renoncer à décerner les Balletos d’Or 2019-2020. À quoi bon ?, disaient-ils, alors qu’il y a d’autres sujets plus pressants – au choix, le sort du ballet à la rentrée prochaine, la prise de muscle inconsidérée chez certains danseurs, ou comment assortir son masque et sa robe… Que nenni, avons-nous répondu ! Aujourd’hui comme hier, et en dépit d’une saison-croupion, la danse et nos prix sont essentiels au redressement spirituel de la nation.

Ministère de la Création franche

Prix Création « Fiat Lux » : Thierry Malandain (La Pastorale)

Prix Zen : William Forsythe (A Quiet Evening of Dance)

Prix Résurrection : Ninette de Valois (Coppelia)

 Prix Plouf ! : Body and Soul de Crystal Pite, un ballet sur la pente descendante.

 Prix Allo Maman Bobo : le sous-texte doloriste de « Degas-Danse » (Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris au musée d’Orsay)

Ministère de la Loge de Côté

Prix Narration: Gregory Dean (Blixen , Ballet royal du Danemark)

Prix Fusion : Natalia de Froberville, le meilleur de l’école russe et un zest d’école française dans Suite en Blanc de Lifar (Toulouse)

Prix Plénitude artistique : Marianela Nuñez (Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake)

Prix les Doigts dans le Nez : le corps de ballet de l’Opéra dans la chorégraphie intriquée de Noureev (Raymonda)

Ministère de la Place sans visibilité

Par décret spécial, le ministère englobe cette année les performances en ligne.

Prix Minutes suspendues : Les 56 vidéos cinéphiliques d’Olivia Lindon pendant le confinement

Prix du montage minuté : Jérémy Leydier, la vidéo du 1er mai du Ballet du Capitole.

Prix La Liberté c’est dans ta tête : Nicolas Rombaut et ses aColocOlytes Emportés par l’hymne à l’Amour

Prix Willis 2.0 : Les filles de l’Australian Ballet assument leur Corps En Tine

Prix Le Spectacle au Quotidien : les danseurs du Mikhailovsky revisitent le grand répertoire dans leur cuisine, leur salle de bain, leur rond-point, etc.

Ministère de la Ménagerie de scène

Prix Lionne blessée : Amandine Albisson dans la Folie de Giselle

Prix Sirène en mal d’Amour : Ludmila Pagliero, mystérieuse danseuse du thème russe de Sérénade

Prix bête de scène : Adam Cooper, Lermontov à fleur de peau dans le Red Shoes de Matthew Bourne (New Adventures in Pictures, Saddler’s Wells)

Prix SyndicaCygne  : Le corps de Ballet féminin de l’opéra sur le parvis du théâtre pour une entrée des cygnes impeccable par temps de grève.

Prix Gerbilles altruistes : Philippe Solano et Tiphaine Prevost. Classes, variations, challenges ; ou comment tourner sa frustration du confinement en services à la personne. Un grand merci.

 

Ministère de la Natalité galopante

Prix Tendresse : Dorothée Gilbert et Mathieu Ganio (Giselle)

Prix Gender Fluid : Calvin Richardson (violoncelle objet-agissant dans The Cellist de Cathy Martson)

Prix Le Prince que nous adorons : Vadim Muntagirov (Swan Lake)

Prix L’Hilarion que nous choisissons : Audric Bezard

Prix Blondeur : Silas Henriksen et Grete Sofie N. Nybakken (Anna Karenina, Christian Spuck)

Prix Vamp : Caroline Osmont dans le 3e Thème des Quatre Tempéraments (soirée Balanchine)

Prix intensité : Julie Charlet et Davit Galstyan dans Les Mirages de Serge Lifar (Toulouse)

Prix un regard et ça repart : Hugo Marchand galvanise Dorothée Gilbert dans Raymonda

Prix Less is More : Stéphane Bullion dans Abderam (Raymonda)

 

Ministère de la Collation d’Entracte

Prix Disette : la prochaine saison d’Aurélie Dupont à l’Opéra de Paris

Prix Famine : la chorégraphie d’Alessio Silvestrin pour At The Hawk’s Well de  Hiroshi Sugimoto (Opéra de Paris)

Ministère de la Couture et de l’Accessoire

Prix Rubber Ducky : Les costumes et les concepts jouet de bain ridicules de At the Hawk’s Well (Rick Owens).

Prix Toupet : Marc-Emmanuel Zanoli, inénarrable barbier-perruquier dans Cendrillon (Ballet de Bordeaux)

Ministère de la Retraite qui sonne

Prix de l’Écarté : Pierre Lacotte (dont la création Le Rouge et le Noir est reportée aux calendes grecques)

Prix Y-a-t-il un pilote dans l’avion ? Vello Pähn perd l’orchestre de l’Opéra de Paris (Tchaïkovski / Bach) pendant la série Georges Balanchine.

Prix Essaye encore une fois : les Adieux d’Eleonora Abbagnato

Prix de l’éclipse : Hervé Moreau

Prix Disparue dans la Covid-Crisis : Aurélie Dupont

Prix À quoi sers-tu en fait ? : Aurélie Dupont

Commentaires fermés sur Les Balletos-d’or 2019-2020

par | 4 août 2020 · 7 h 39 min

Giselle in Paris : Ut Pictura Poesis

Dorothée Gilbert/Mathieu Ganio (February 11th) and Amandine Albisson/Hugo Marchand (February 15th matinée)

Act One(s)

Gilbert/Ganio.Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt. Their skies may change, but not the souls of those who chase across the sea. Ceux qui traversent la mer changent de ciel, non d’esprit (Horace, Epistles)

Gilbert’s Giselle, a more fragile and melancholy version of her naïve and loving Lise of La Fille mal gardée, was doomed from the start, like the Flying Dutchman. In those joyous “catch me if you can” jétés and arabesques with Ganio’s equally interiorized and gentle and devoted Albrecht, Gilbert’s suspended phrasing and softened lines started to make me shiver. What I was seeing was the first act as remembered by the ghost of the second. Gestures were quiet, subtle, distilled for both protagonists as in a 19th century sepia print: the couple was already not of this world. I have rarely been so well prepared to enter into the otherworld of Act II. Those on the stage and in the audience were as one soul, drawn into reminiscing together about daisies in tears and about “what might have been.”

La Giselle de Gilbert, une plus fragile et mélancolique version de sa naïve Lise de La Fille mal gardée, était condamnée dès le départ, comme le Hollandais volant. Avec ces joyeux jetés « Attrape-moi si tu peux » et ses arabesques avec l’Albrecht également doux, intériorisé et dévoué de Ganio, Gilbert suspendait le phrasé et adoucissait les lignes […] Et si on assistait au premier acte vu par les yeux du fantôme du deuxième ?

Albisson/Marchand. Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero. Seize the day, and care not to trust in the morrow. Cueille le jour présent, en te fiant le moins possible au lendemain (Horace, Epodes)

At the matinee on the 15th, we enter another world, this time fully in the present, with a joyous and self-assured pair blissfully unaware of what lies in store. Down to earth, they make no secret of their mutual attraction, neither to each other nor before the village. When Albisson’s daisy predicts “he loves me not,” clearly this is the first time a cloud has passed before the sun in her sky. Gilbert’s Giselle seemed to withdraw into a dark place upon her mother’s cautionary tale about the Wilis (the supremely dignified Ninon Raux at both performances). Albisson’s Giselle seemed more bewildered by the brief sensation of being possessed by a force she could not control. “How can such awful things even be possible? Why am I shivering when there is sunlight?” Most often, the Albrechts stand back, turn their backs on mama, and let the heroine have her moment. But here Marchand’s intense concentration on what the mother was describing – as if he, in turn, was experiencing his first glimpse of the shadows to come, possessed by a force he could not control either –made the moment even richer. Aurora and Desiré had just been told that, in the end, they would not live happily ever after. Marchand, as with the daisy, kept on trying to make everything work out. There are some Albrecht’s who try to shush Bathilde over Giselle’s shoulder [“Let me explain later”], and those who don’t. Marchand tried.

Pour la matinée du 15, on entre dans un autre monde, cette fois pleinement dans le présent, avec un duo béatement ignorant de ce que l’avenir leur prépare. […]

La Giselle de Gilbert semblait s’enfoncer dans les ténèbres au moment des avertissements de sa mère sur les Willis (la suprêmement digne Ninon Raux lors des deux représentations). La Giselle d’Albisson semblait plus déconcertée par la brève sensation d’être possédée par une force qu’elle ne pouvait contrôler. « Comment de si horribles choses seraient-elles seulement possibles ? Pourquoi tremblé-je sous le soleil ?»

To Bathilde – rendered unusually attentive, warm, and reactive by Sara Kora Dayanova – Gilbert mimed winding thread (another Lise reference), twirling her fingers delicately downward. Her mad scene had the quality of a skein of silk becoming unravelled and increasingly hopelessly knotted and pulled in all directions. Albisson mimed sewing in big healthy stitches instead. Her physically terrifying mad scene – just how can you fling yourself about and fall down splat like that without injury? — reminded me of the person just served divorce papers who grabs a knife and shreds all her partner’s clothes and smashes all she can get her hands on, and then jumps out the window.

À l’intention de Bathilde – rendue exceptionnellement attentive, chaleureuse et réactive par Sara Kora Dayanova – Gilbert mimait le filage de la laine (une autre référence à Lise), tortillant délicatement ses doigts vers le bas. Sa scène de la folie avait cette qualité de l’écheveau de soie devenant désespérément dénoué et emmêlé à force d’être tiré dans toutes les directions. Albisson mimait plutôt la couture à points larges et décidés. Sa scène de la folie, physiquement terrifiante, – jusqu’où peut-on se démener violemment et s’effondrer à plat sans se blesser ? – m’a rappelé ces personnes recevant les papiers du divorce qui saisissent un couteau, déchiquètent les vêtements de leur partenaire et brisent tout ce qui leur tombe sous la main avant de sauter par la fenêtre.

Second Act(s)

Permitis divis cetera. Leave the rest to the gods. Remettez-vous en aux dieux (Horace, Epodes)

Gilbert’s Act II lived in the realm of tears. The vine-like way she would enfold Ganio in her arms – and I was smitten by the way he interlaced himself into all her gestures and thoughts – defined their couple. They reached for each other. Here, at the same moments, Albisson was less about tears than about how insistently she stretched her arms up towards the heavens just before re-connecting to Marchard’s avid hands. “I remember you swore to love me forever. And now I am certain you were true. The skies know this.”

L’acte II de Gilbert se situait dans une vallée de larmes. Sa façon d’enlacer Ganio de ses bras telle une vigne vierge – et j’ai été touchée de la manière dont Ganio s’entrelaçait lui-même dans ses gestes et dans ses pensées – définissait leur couple. […] Ici, aux mêmes moments, Albisson était moins dans les larmes que dans l’intensité de l’étirement des bras vers les cieux juste avant de reconnecter avec ceux avides de Marchand : « Je me souviens que tu as juré de m’aimer pour toujours et maintenant je suis certaine que tu disais vrai » […]

In Act II, Marchand doesn’t need to run around searching for Giselle’s grave. He knows where it stands and just can’t bear to deal with how real it is. He also knows how useless bouquets of flowers are to the dead. He has come to this spot in the hope that the vengeful Wilis of her mother’s horrifying tale will come to take him. But his un-hoped for encounter with Giselle in the “flesh” changes his mind. As in Act I, they cannot stop trying to touch each other. This pair risked those big overhead lifts with breathtaking simplicity, in the spirit of how, for their couple, love had been wrapped around their need to touch. The final caress bestowed by this Albrecht upon all he had left of the woman he would indeed love forever – the heavy stone cross looming above Giselle’s tomb — made perfect sense.

À l’acte II, Marchand […] sait combien les bouquets de fleurs sont inutiles aux morts. Il est venu là dans l’espoir que les Willis vengeresses […] le prennent. Mais sa rencontre inespérée avec Giselle en « chair » et en os le fait changer d’avis. Ces deux-là ne peuvent s’empêcher de se toucher. Ils ont osé le grand porté par-dessus la tête avec une simplicité époustouflante. […] La caresse finale que donne Marchand à tout ce qui lui reste de cette femme qu’il aimera toujours – la lourde croix de pierre surplombant la tombe de Giselle – avait tout son sens.

Hilarion (one and only).

Pallida Mors aequo pulsat pede pauperum tabernas/Regumque turris. Pale Death knocks with impartial foot at poor men’s hovels as at rich men’s palaces. La pâle mort frappe d’un pied indifférent les masures des pauvres et les palais des rois. (Horace, Epodes)

Audric Bezard, both times. Both times elegant, forceful, and technically on top as usual, but different and creative in his approach to this essential – but often crudely crafted — character. With Gilbert, Bezard reacted in a more melancholy and deeply worried manner. Some neophytes in the audience might have even mistaken him for a protective older brother. Hilarion opens the ballet with his mimed “she loves me not” and the way he nuanced it then and thereafter built up a backstory for Gilbert: « I grew up with the girl, everyone – even me – assumed we would live happily ever after. Why is this happening? » But, alas, “that nice boy next door” can sometimes be the last thing a girl wants, even if he be soulful and cute. Bezard’s rhythm in mime is magnificent in the way it takes its time inside and along the lines of the music. You see thoughts shaping themselves into gesture. With Albisson, one saw less of that long-term story. I appreciated his alternate approach, more reminiscent of the impetuous in-the-moment passion Bezard had already demonstrated as a leading partner to this same ballerina in other dramatic ballets…

Audric Bézard les deux fois. Chaque fois […] créatif dans son approche de ce personnage essentiel – mais si souvent interprété trop crûment.

Avec Gilbert, Bezard réagissait d’une manière plus mélancolique et soucieuse. […] Hilarion ouvre le ballet avec sa scène mimée « Elle ne m’aime pas » et la façon dont il la nuançait ici et plus tard fabriquait un passé à Gilbert : « J’ai grandi avec cette fille, et tout le monde – moi y compris – était persuadé que nous serions heureux pour toujours. Pourquoi cela arrive-t-il ? » […] La façon qu’à Bezard de rythmer sa pantomime est magnifique en ce qu’il prend son temps à l’intérieur et aux côtés de la musique. […] Avec Albisson, on voyait moins une histoire au long cours. J’ai apprécié cette approche alternative réminiscence de l’impétuosité de l’instant que Bezard avait déjà développé dans un rôle principal aux côtés de la même ballerine.

Myrtha(s):

Nunc pede libero pulsanda tellus. Now is the time to beat the earth with unfettered foot. Il est temps maintenant de battre le sol avec des pieds sans entraves. (Horace, Odes).

If Valentine Colasante’s Queen of the Wilis on the 11th proved the very vision of a triumphant and eerie ectoplasm so beloved by 19th century Victorians, Hannah O’Neill’s on the 15th seemed instead to have risen out of an assemblage of twigs and bones (which is not potentially a bad thing). Let me explain.

As a dancer, Colasante’s elongated neck now connects to eased shoulders that send the word down her spine, releasing pulsating energy. The result? Probably among the most perfectly fluid series of bourrées I have ever seen. The feet or legs should start from the head, from the brain, but most often they do not. These tiny tippy-toe steps – pietinées in French — often seem to have been designed to make dancers look like scuttling crabs. Colasante’s bourrées, so fluid and expressive and instantly in character, were those of someone who has really evolved as an artist. Control and release extended out from a really intelligent core informing her big, juicy, regal jumps and expressive back [Myrtha spends a lot of her time downstage facing away from House Right]. Mind-body intelligence infused even the tiniest of Colasante’s calm and unhurried gestures. Each of the umpteen times she had to mime “thanks for your thoughts and prayers, but now you must die ” — raise arms, clench fists, bring them down across the wrists– Colasante gave that gesture variety, reactivity, and lived in the moment.

[Le 11] Le cou de [Valentine] Colasante désormais allongé se connecte à des épaules déliées qui transmet le mouvement dans toute sa colonne vertébrale, libérant et pulsant de l’énergie. Le résultat ? Probablement parmi les plus fluides séries de piétinés qu’il m’ait été donné de voir. Car les pieds ou les jambes doivent commencer de la tête, du cerveau même ; et cela arrive si peu souvent. […] Ce contrôlé -relâché se diffusait depuis un centre très « intelligent » et infusait de larges, de savoureux et souverains sauts ainsi qu’un dos intelligent.

For the moment, O’Neill is on a learning curve and her stage presence has retrograded to more serious and studious than I would like for her to be doing at this point in her career. It’s if she’s lost that something so fresh and lively she used to have. Yes, you might say, “who do you think you are to expect fresh and lively from a Queen of the Zombies?” O’Neill did the job with full-out dedication, but seemed so…dry, despite perfectly executed steps. She needs to add some more mental flesh to the twigs and bones of her overly reserved phantom. My mind drifted way too often in the direction of impressive technical details. I couldn’t believe that this was really Myrtha, not the dancer named Hannah O’Neill. Until then, during both performances, I had completely been swept into the zone by all of the dancers described above as well as by the delicious demi-soloists and corps de ballet

Pour l’instant, [Hannah] O’Neill semble en phase d’apprentissage et sa présence scénique a rétrogradé vers quelque chose de plus sérieux et studieux qu’il ne le faudrait à ce stade de sa carrière. […] O’Neill a « fait le travail » avec une totale implication mais semblait tellement … aride, en dépit des pas parfaitement exécutés. Il lui faudrait ajouter de la chair émotionnelle sur les os de son trop réservé fantôme.

Hannah ONeill

Cléopold saw a distinct delicacy in her version of Myrtha from where he was sitting, and I do not wish to be harsh. But in a poetic story-ballet, technique must learn to serve the story above all else.

Ut pictora poesis. As in painting, so in poetry. Telle la peinture est la poésie (Horace, Ars Poetica).

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Giselle à l’Opéra : l’épreuve du temps

Giselle (musique Adolphe Adam, chorégraphie : Jean Coralli et Jules Perrot révisée par Marius Petipa. Version 1991 de Patrice Bart et Eugène Poliakov). Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Représentations des 7, 11 et 15 février (matinée). Orchestre Pasdeloup; direction Koen Kessels.

À chaque reprise d’un grand classique (chorégraphique ou non), une question revient : celle de la pertinence ou de l’actualité de l’œuvre « re-présentée ». Comment telle histoire d’amour, pensée à une époque où les conventions sociales et les tabous étaient autres, peut-elle encore parler à notre époque? Certains grands succès d’autrefois sont éclipsés voire poussés dans l’oubli par des œuvres contemporaines auparavant considérées comme mineures. Aujourd’hui, on oublie souvent que Giselle, n’a pas toujours eu ce statut d’intemporalité qu’on lui reconnaît à présent. Disparu du répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris en 1867, bien qu’il ait été à l’époque l’objet d’une luxueuse reprise à l’occasion de la venue dans la capitale d’une ballerine russe, Martha Murawieva, le ballet ne revint sur une scène parisienne qu’en 1909 avec la production Alexandre Benois des Ballets russes de Serge de Diaghilev. Encore à l’époque, la réaction du public parisien, constitutivement peu intéressé par la conservation du patrimoine chorégrahique, fut-elle mitigée. Le ballet fut souvent considéré suranné. Ce qui sauva la chorégraphie et le ballet lui-même, ce furent ses interprètes : la suprêmement belle Tamara Karsavina et le désormais légendaire Vaslaw Nijinski.

*

 *                                       *

Et au soir du 7 février, rien ne paraissait plus criant que la nécessité d’interprètes forts pour faire revivre une œuvre du passé. Sur la distribution réunissant Léonore Baulac et Germain Louvet, je ne vois pas grand-chose à rajouter après la relation qu’en a faite l’ami James. Voilà néanmoins les pensées qui m’ont traversé l’esprit pendant le premier acte. La rencontre Giselle-Albrecht : « Décidément, je déteste cette production prétendument Benois. Ça y est, Albrecht frappe à la porte et la petite maison tremble sur ses fondements… » La Marguerite : « Qui est l’architecte de ce château ? Il s’embête à construire un donjon sur un deuxième pic rocheux et il le relie au château par un pont en pierre… ». La scène avec les paysans : « Il n’y a pas à dire… Ces villageois pètent dans le satin et la soie ! Et puis ça danse presque trop chic. Qui est le coiffeur du grand blond à la mèche impeccable ? » Le pas de deux des vendangeurs : « Elle est où, Eléonore Guérineau ? Vite, mes jumelles ! » Hilarion découvre le pot aux roses : « C’est bizarre quand même… Comment le blason sur l’épée d’Albrecht-Loys peut-il être le même que celui du cornet à bouquetin du duc de Courlande ? Ça manque de logique… Ah, mais il faut vraiment que je ne sois pas dedans ! François Alu-rion est pourtant formidable… Il joue, lui… À vrai dire, au milieu de cette gravure mièvre et palie, on dirait un personnage vigoureusement peint à l’huile ! ». La scène de la folie « Oh dis donc, elle a le bras trop raide, Hasboun en Bathilde, quand elle remonte le praticable »…

N’en jetez plus… L’acte blanc qui repose moins sur une narration a beau être de meilleure tenue dramatique, surtout pour mademoiselle Baulac, on ressort curieusement vide de cette représentation. Tout cela nous a paru bien désuet.

 

*

 *                                       *

Pour autant, on ne demande pas nécessairement aux danseurs de rendre actuel un ballet créé en 1841. Durant la soirée du 11, Dorothée Gilbert et Mathieu Ganio interprétaient les rôles principaux avec une sensibilité très « romantique XIXème » sans pour cela sentir la naphtaline.

Ce qui marque dès l’entrée de Gilbert, c’est la finesse des détails, aussi bien dans la danse (légèreté des ballonnés coupés) que dans la pantomime, ciselée, précise et intelligente : l’air de gêne que prend Giselle lorsque sa mère fait le récit de sa maladie à Bathilde (Sarah Kora Dayanova, très noble et pleine d’autorité) est très réaliste et touchant. Mathieu Ganio est un Loys-Albert très prévenant. Il se montre tactile mais sans agressivité. C’est un amoureux sincère dont le seul crime est d’être trop léger. Le couple fonctionne à merveille comme lors des agaceries aux baisers avec le corps de ballet : chacune des feintes des deux danseurs est différente. La scène de la folie de Dorothée Gilbert est dans la même veine. La jeune danseuse brisée, qui s’effondre comme une masse, convoque les grandes scènes de folies de l’Opéra romantique.

Autant dire qu’on oublie alors, la petite maison qui tremble, le château impossible et même la stupide remontée du praticable par les aristocrates chasseurs pendant la scène de la folie.

Lors de la soirée du 7, on s’était graduellement réchauffé à l’interprétation de Léonore Baulac (aux jolis équilibres et aux retombées mousseuses) sans vraiment pouvoir y adhérer. Ici, parfaitement mis en condition, on entre directement dans le vif du sujet. Il faut dire que Valentine Colasante est une Myrtha de haute volée, à la fois très sculpturale et fantomatique (par la suspension des piqués-arabesque). Et puis, dans la première des deux Willis, il y a Éléonore Guérineau,  toute en torsions harmonieuses des lignes (sa présentation des épaules et du dos est admirable et ses bras quasi-calligraphiques).

Dorothée Gilbert, quant à elle, est, dès sa première apparition, une Giselle absolument sans poids. Elle semble, là encore, être l’incarnation d’une lithographie romantique. À cela, elle ajoute néanmoins une touche personnelle avec ses très beaux équilibres qui, au lieu d’être portés vers l’avant, semblent tirés vers l’arrière lorsqu’Albrecht précède Giselle. Cette communication silencieuse est extrêmement émouvante. Mathieu Ganio dépeint un amant presque résigné à la mort. Le troc des fameux entrechats six contre des sauts de basque a du sens dramatiquement. En s’agenouillant devant Myrtha, le prince semble accepter son sort. Lorsque Giselle-Gilbert disparaît dans sa tombe, Albrecht-Ganio s’éloigne en laissant tomber une à une les fleurs de son bouquet comme on se dépouille de ses dernières illusions.

*

 *                                       *

Le 15 en matinée, on fait une toute autre expérience. Le duo Albisson-Marchand resitue l’histoire de Giselle dans le monde contemporain et l’ensemble du ballet en bénéficie. On n’a plus fait attention aux incohérences et aux conventions vieillottes de la production. Le corps de ballet ne semble plus aussi sagement tiré au cordeau que le premier soir. Pendant le pas de deux des vendangeurs, quand Éléonore Guérineau attire l’attention du groupe et de Bathilde avec un naturel désarmant, toute l’attention de ce petit monde semble rivée sur elle.

Amandine Albisson dépeint une Giselle saine et apparemment forte  face à l’Albrecht empressé d’Hugo Marchand. Leur histoire d’amour est sans ambages. Dans la scène d’opposition entre Hilarion et Albrecht, ce sont deux gars qui s’opposent et non deux conditions sociales. L’Hilarion d’Audric Bezard, déjà au parfait le 7, gagne pourtant ici en profondeur psychologique. Sa déception face à la rebuffade de son amie d’enfance est absolument touchante. Quand Giselle-Amandine, met ses mains sur ses oreilles au plus fort de la dispute, on croirait l’entendre dire « Stop. Assez! ». Hugo Marchand, n’est pas en reste de détails d’interprétation réalistes. Lorsque Giselle lui présente le médaillon donné par Bathilde, sa contrariété est palpable et dure même pendant la diagonale sur pointe (exécutée il est vrai un peu chichement par sa partenaire).

Le couple traite la scène de la folie avec cette même acuité contemporaine. Au moment où Bathilde déclare à Giselle qu’elle est la fiancée officielle d’Albrecht, on peut voir Hugo marchand, un doigt sur la bouche, dire « Non ne dis rien! » à sa fiancée officielle. Ce geste peut être interprété de différente manière, plus ou moins flatteuse pour le héros. Pour ma part, j’y ai vu la tentative de protéger Giselle. Là encore, la différence de statut, les fiançailles officielles ne semblent pas l’obstacle majeur. Comme cela serait sans doute le cas aujourd’hui dans la vraie vie, Giselle a le cœur brisé quand elle se rend compte qu’elle n’est ni la première ni la seule dans la vie de son premier amour. Sa folie ressemble un peu à une crise maniaco-dépressive. Au début, elle sourit trop, marquant le sentiment de sur-pouvoir. Les sourires et les agaceries du début se répètent mais paraissent désormais s’être « dévoyés ». Puis elle passe par des phases de colère avant de tomber dans l’abattement. Sa panique à la fin est saisissante. Ses effondrements au sol sont presque véristes… L’acte se termine dans une réelle confusion. On est totalement conquis.

À l’acte 2, on n’a plus qu’à se laisser porter. La rencontre des deux amants garde ce parfum actuel. Là où le couple Gilbert-Ganio était dans la communication silencieuse, le duo Albisson-Marchand converse. C’est une rencontre paranormale. Après la série des portés au milieu du cercle des Willis (impitoyable et dont les placements étaient à la limite du militaire cette saison) sous le regard impavide de Myrtha-O’Neill (dont on a aimé aussi bien le 7 que le 15 la belle élévation et les bras soyeux), Giselle, en faisant ses temps levés arabesque, par une subtile inflexion des directions et par l’angle du bras, semble crier « courage ! » à son amant.

Albrecht-Marchand, finalement sauvé, repart avec une des marguerites du bouquet d’Hilarion et non avec des lys. Aucun doute que cette modeste fleur arbore, cette fois-ci, le bon nombre de pétales.

Et à l’instar de cette modeste fleur,  le ballet tout entier a regagné sa fraîcheur des premiers jours.

Commentaires fermés sur Giselle à l’Opéra : l’épreuve du temps

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Swan Lake in Paris: Cotton, Velvet, Silk

Le Lac des Cygnes, Paris Opera Ballet, March 11, 2019

[des extraits de l’article sont traduits en français]

Never in my life have I attended a Swan Lake where, instead of scrabbling noisily in my bag for a Kleenex, I actually dug in deeper to grab pen and bit of paper in order to start ticking off how many times the Odette and Odile did “perfect ten” developés à la seconde. Every single one was identically high and proud, utterly uninflected and indifferent to context, without the slightest nuance or nod to dramatic development. I noted around twenty-two from the time I started counting. This is horrifying. The infinite possibilities of these developés lie at the core of how the dancer will develop the narrative of the character’s transformation.

Riches have wings, and grandeur is a dream.
Sae Eun Park, this Odette-Odile, has all the skills a body would ever need, but where is the personal artistry, the phrasing, the sound of the music? I keep hoping that one day something will happen to this beautiful girl and that her line and energy will not just keep stopping predictably at the mere ends of her fingers and toes. Flapping your arms faster or slower just does not a Swan Queen make.

 

 

Made poetry a mere mechanic art.
Park’s lines and positions and balances are always camera-ready and as faultless as images reprinted on cotton fabric…but I prefer a moving picture: one where unblocked energy radiates beyond the limits of the dancer’s actual body especially when, ironically, the position is a still one. Bending back into Matthieu Ganio’s warmly proffered arms, Park’s own arms – while precisely placed –never radiated out from that place deep down in the spine. Technical maestria should be a means, not an end.

I want a lyre with other strings.
Even Park’s fouettés bothered me. All doubles at first = O.K. that’s impressive = who cares about the music? Whether in black or white, this swan just never let me hear the music at all.

Coton

Jamais je n’avais assisté à un Lac des cygnes où, au lieu de farfouiller bruyamment dans mon sac à la recherche d’un Kleenex, j’ai farfouillé  pour trouverbloc-notes et stylo afin de comptabiliser combien de fois Odette et Odile effectuaient un développé à la seconde 10.0/10.0. Chacun d’entre eux était identiquement et crânement haut placé, manquant totalement d’inflexions et indifférent au contexte […] J’en ai dénombré vingt-deux à partir du moment où j’ai commencé à compter. […]

Les lignes, les positions et les équilibres de Park sont toujours prêts pour le clic-photo et l’impression sur coton. Mais […] se cambrant dans les bras chaleureusement offerts de Mathieu Ganio, les bras de Park – bien que parfaitement placés – n’irradiaient pas cette énergie qui doit partir du plus profond de la colonne vertébrale. […]

Même les fouettés de Park m’ont gêné.

Tous double au début = Ok, c’est impressionnant = Au diable la musique !

En blanc comme en noir, ce cygne ne m’a jamais laissé entendre la musique.

Silently as a dream the fabric rose: -/No sound of hammer or of saw was there.
Mathieu Ganio’s Siegfried started out as an easy-going youth, mildly troubled by strange dreams, at ease with his privileged status, never having suffered nor even been forced to think about life in any large sense. A youth of today, albeit with delicate hands that reached out to those surrounding him.

As if the world and he were hand and glove.
Ganio’s manner of gently under-reacting reminded me – as when the Queen strode in to announce that he must now take a wife – of a young friend who once assured me that “all you have to do when your mother walks into your head is to say ‘yes, mom,’ and then just go off to do whatever you want.” Yet his solo at the end of Act I delicately unfolded just how he’d been considering that perhaps this velvet cocoon he’d been raised in may not be what he wants after all. Ganio is a master of soft and beautifully-placed landings, of arabesques where every part of his body extends off and beyond the limits of a pose, of mere line. He makes all those fussy Nureyevian rond-de-jambes and raccourcis breathe – they fill time and space — and thus seem unforced and utterly natural. When I watch him, that cliché about how “your body is your instrument” comes fully to life.

Alas, no matter how he tried, his character would develop more through interaction with his frenemy than with his supposed beloved.

Velours

Le Siegfried de Mathieu Ganio se présente d’abord comme un jeune homme sans problèmes à peine troublé par des rêves étranges, satisfait de son statut privilégié, n’ayant jamais souffert et n’ayant jamais été contraint de penser au sens de la vie. […]

Néanmoins, son solo de l’acte 1 révélait combien il commençait à considérer que, peut-être, le cocon de  velours dans lequel il avait été élevé n’était peut-être pas ce qu’il voulait, après tout. Ganio est passé maître dans le domaine des réceptions aussi silencieuses que bien placées, et des arabesques où toutes les parties du corps s’étendent au-delà des limites de la simple pose. Il rend respirés tous ces rond-de-jambe et raccourcis tarabiscotés de Noureev – ils remplissent le temps et l’espace – et les fait paraître naturels et sans contrainte.

Hélas, quoi qu’il ait essayé, son personnage s’est plus développé dans ses interactions avec son frère-ennemi qu’avec sa supposée bien aimée. […]

Great princes have great playthings.

 

Jérémy-Loup Quer used the stage as a canvas upon which to paint a most elegant Tutor/von Rothbart. Less loose and jazzy with the music than François Alu on the 26th, more mysterious and silken, Quer’s characterization thoughtfully pulled at the strings of this role. Is he two people? Two-in-one? A figment of Siegfried’s imagination? Of the Queen’s? A jealous Duc d’Orleans playing nice to the young Louis XV? By the accumulation of subtle brushstrokes that were gentle and soundless on the floor, and of masterfully scumbled layers of deceptively simple acting – here less violent at first vis-à-vis Siegfried during the dueling duets– Quer commanded the viewer’s attention and really connected with Ganio. His high and whiplash tours en l’air and feather-light manège during his Act III variation served to hint at just how badly this mysterious character wanted to wind Siegfried’s mind deep into the grip of the voluminous folds of his cape.

Grief is itself a med’cine.
When this von Rothbart finally lashed out in the last act – and clearly he was definitely yet another incarnation of the Tutor from Act I — both Siegfried and the audience simultaneously came to the sickening conclusion that we had all been admiring a highly intelligent and murderous sociopath.

Soie

Jérémy-Loup Quer, […] moins jazzy musicalement que François Alu le 26, est plus mystérieux et soyeux. […] Par une accumulation de subtiles touches, […], et par l’usage souverain d’une quantité d’artifices de jeu dont la simplicité n’est qu’apparente, […] Quer captait l’attention du spectateur et interagissait réellement avec Ganio. Ses hauts tours en l’air « coup de cravache » et son manège léger comme une plume durant sa variation de l’acte 3 laissaient deviner combien ce mystérieux personnage voulait aspirer la raison de Siegfried dans les volumineux replis de sa cape […] tel un sociopathe hautement intelligent et criminel.

Quotes are from the pre-Romantic poet William Cowper’s (1731-1800) Table Talk, The Taste, and his Sonnet to Mrs. Unwin.

Commentaires fermés sur Swan Lake in Paris: Cotton, Velvet, Silk

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

La Dame aux Camélias : histoires de ballerines

Le tombeau d’Alphonsine Plessis

La Dame aux Camélias est un ballet fleuve qui a ses rapides mais aussi ses eaux stagnantes. Neumeier, en décidant courageusement de ne pas demander une partition réorchestrée mais d’utiliser des passages intacts d’œuvres de Chopin a été conduit parfois à quelques longueurs et redites (le « black pas de deux », sur la Balade en sol mineur opus 23, peut sembler avoir trois conclusions si les danseurs ne sont pas en mesure de lui donner une unité). Aussi, pour une soirée réussie de ce ballet, il faut un subtil équilibre entre le couple central et les nombreux rôles solistes (notamment les personnages un tantinet lourdement récurrents de Manon et Des Grieux qui reflètent l’état psychologique des héros) et autres rôles presque mimés (le duc, mais surtout le père, omniprésent et pivot de la scène centrale du ballet). Dans un film de 1976 avec la créatrice du rôle, Marcia Haydée, on peut voir tout le travail d’acteur que Neumeier a demandé à ses danseurs. Costumes, maquillages, mais aussi postures et attitudes sont une évocation plus que plausible de personnages de l’époque romantique. Pour la scène des bals bleu et rouge de l’acte 1, même les danseurs du corps de ballet doivent être dans un personnage. À l’Opéra, cet équilibre a mis du temps à être atteint. Ce n’est peut-être qu’à la dernière reprise que tout s’était mis en place. Après cinq saisons d’interruption et la plupart des titulaires des rôles principaux en retraite, qu’allait-il se passer?

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 7 décembre, Léonore Baulac s’essayait au rôle de Marguerite. On ne pouvait imaginer danseuse plus différente que celles dont nous avons pris l’habitude et qui sont en quelque sorte « commandées » par la créatrice du rôle, Marcia Haydée. Mademoiselle Baulac est très juvénile. Il aurait été dangereux d’essayer de portraiturer une Marguerite Gautier plus âgée que son Armand. Ses dernières interprétations en patchwork, depuis son étoilat, laissaient craindre qu’elle aurait pris cette option. Heureusement, mis à part peut-être la première variation au théâtre, un peu trop conduite et sèche, elle prend, avec son partenaire Mathieu Ganio, l’option qui lui convient le mieux : celle de la jeunesse de l’héroïne de Dumas-fils (dont le modèle, Alphonsine Plessis, mourut à l’âge de 24 ans). Mathieu Ganio est lui aussi, bien que doyen des étoiles masculines de l’Opéra depuis des lustres, un miracle de juvénilité. Il arrive d’ailleurs à la vente aux enchères comme un soupir. Son évanouissement est presque sans poids. Cette jeunesse des héros fait merveille sur le pas de deux mauve. C’est un charmant badinage amoureux. Armand se prend les pieds dans le tapis et ne se vexe pas. Il divertit et fait rire de bon cœur sa Marguerite. Les deux danseurs « jouent » la tergiversation plus qu’ils ne la vivent. Ils se sont déjà reconnus. À l’acte 2, le pas de deux en blanc est dans la même veine. On apprécie l’intimité des portés, la façon dont les dos se collent et se frottent, la sensualité naïve de cette relation. Peut-être pense-t-on aussi que Léonore-Marguerite, dont la peau rayonne d’un éclat laiteux, n’évoque pas exactement une tuberculeuse.

Tout change pourtant dans la confrontation avec le père d’Armand (Yann Saïz, assez passable) où la lumière semble la quitter et où le charmant ovale du visage se creuse sous nos yeux. Le pas de deux de renoncement entre Léonore Baulac et Mathieu Ganio n’est pas sans évoquer la mort de la Sylphide. A posteriori, on se demande même si ce n’est pas à une évocation du ballet entier de Taglioni auquel on a été convié, le badinage innocent du pas-de-deux mauve rappelant les jeux d’attrape-moi si tu peux du premier ballet romantique. Cette option intelligente convient bien à mademoiselle Baulac à ce stade de sa carrière.

Au troisième acte, dans la scène au bois, Léonore-Marguerite apparaît comme vidée de sa substance. Le contraste est volontairement et péniblement violent avec l’apparente bonne santé de l’Olympe d’Héloïse Bourdon. Sur l’ensemble de ce troisième acte, mis à part des accélérations et des alanguissements troublants dans le pas de deux en noir, l’héroïne subit son destin (Ganio est stupidement cruel à souhait pendant la scène de bal) : que peut faire une Sylphide une fois qu’elle a perdu ses ailes ?

La distribution Baulac-Ganio bénéficiait sans doute de la meilleure équipe de seconds rôles. On retrouvait avec plaisir la Prudence, subtil mélange de bonté et de rouerie (la courtisane qui va réussir), de Muriel Zusperreguy aux côtés d’un Paul Marque qui nous convainc sans doute pour la première fois. Le danseur apparaissait enfin au dessus de sa danse et cette insolente facilité donnait ce qu’il faut de bravache à la variation de la cravache. On retrouvait avec un plaisir non dissimulé le comte de N. de Simon Valastro, chef d’œuvre de timing comique (ses chutes et ses maladresses de cornets ou de bouquets sont inénarrables) mais également personnage à part entière qui émeut aussi par sa bonté dans le registre plus grave de l’acte 3.

Eve Grinsztajn retrouvait également dans Manon, un rôle qui lui sied bien. Elle était ce qu’il faut élégante et détachée lors de sa première apparition mais surtout implacable pendant la confrontation entre Marguerite et le père d’Armand. On s’étonnait de la voir chercher ses pieds dans le pas de quatre avec ses trois prétendants qui suit le pas de deux en noir. Très touchante dans la dernière scène au théâtre (la mort de Manon), elle disparaît pourtant et ne revient pas pour le pas-de-trois final (la mort de Marguerite). Son partenaire, Marc Moreau, improvise magistralement un pas deux avec Léonore Baulac. Cette péripétie est une preuve, en négatif, du côté trop récurrent et inorganique du couple Manon-Des Grieux dans le ballet de John Neumeier.

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 14 décembre, c’était au tour de Laura Hecquet d’aborder le rôle de la courtisane au grand cœur de Dumas. Plus grande courtisane que dans « la virginité du vice », un soupçon maniérée, la Marguerite de Laura Hecquet se sait sur la fin. Elle est plus rouée aussi dans la première scène au théâtre. Le grand pas de deux en mauve est plus fait de vas-et-viens, d’abandons initiés suivis de reculs. Laura-Marguerite voudrait rester sur les bords du précipice au fond duquel elle se laisse entraîner. Florian Magnenet est plus virulent, plus ombrageux que Mathieu Ganio. Sa première entrée, durant la scène de vente aux enchères, est très belle. Il se présente, essoufflé par une course échevelée dans Paris. Son évanouissement est autant le fait de l’émotion que de l’épuisement physique. On retrouvera cette même qualité des courses au moment de la lecture de la lettre de rupture : très sec, avec l’énergie il courre de part et d’autres de la scène d’une manière très réaliste. Son mouvement parait désarticulé par la fatigue. A l’inverse, Magnenet a dans la scène au bois des marches de somnambule. Plus que sa partenaire, il touche par son hébétude.

Le couple Hecquet-Magnenet n’est pas pourtant sans quelques carences. Elles résident principalement dans les portés hauts où la danseuse ne semble jamais très à l’aise. Le pas de deux à la campagne est surtout touchant lorsque les deux danseurs glissent et s’emmêlent au sol. Il en est de même dans le pas-de-deux noir, pas tant mémorable pour la partie noire que pour la partie chair, avec des enroulements passionnés des corps et des bras.

Le grand moment pour Laura Hecquet reste finalement la rencontre avec le père. d’Andrei Klemm, vraie figue paternelle, qui ne semble pas compter ses pas comme le précédent (Saïz) mais semble bien hésiter et tergiverser. Marguerite-Laura commence sa confrontation avec des petits développés en 4e sur pointe qui ressemblent à des imprécations, puis se brise. La progression de toute la scène est admirablement menée. Hecquet, ressemble à une Piéta. Le pas deux final de l’acte 2 avec Armand est plus agonie d’Odette qu’une mort Sylphide. Lorsqu’elle pousse son amant à partir, ses bras étirés à l’infini ressemblent à des ailes. C’est absolument poignant.

Le reste des seconds rôles pour cette soirée n’était pas très porteur. On a bien sûr du plaisir à revoir Sabrina Mallem dans un rôle conséquent, mais son élégante Prudence nous laisse juste regretter de ne pas la voir en Marguerite. Axel Magliano se montre encore un peu vert en Gaston Rieux. Il a une belle ligne et un beau ballon, mais sa présence est un peu en berne et il ne domine pas encore tout à fait sa technique dans la variation à la cravache (les pirouettes achevées par une promenade à ronds de jambe). Adrien Bodet n’atteint pas non plus la grâce délicieusement cucul de Valastro. Dans la scène du bal rouge, on ne le reconnait pas forcément dans le pierrot au bracelet de diamants.

On apprécie le face à face entre Florian Magnenet et le Des Grieux de Germain Louvet en raison de leur similitude physique. On reste plus sur la réserve face à la Manon de Ludmilla Pagliero qui ne devient vraiment convaincante que dans les scènes de déchéance de Manon.

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 19 décembre au soir, Amandine Albisson et Audric Bezard faisaient leur entrée dans la Dame aux camélias. Et on a assisté à ce qui sans doute aura été la plus intime, la plus passionnée, la plus absolument satisfaisante des incarnations du couple cette saison. Pour son entrée dans la scène de vente aux enchères, Bezard halète d’émotion. Sa souffrance est réellement palpable. On admire la façon dont cet Armand brisé qui tourne le dos au public se mue sans transition, s’étant retourné durant le changement à vue vers la scène au théâtre, en jeune homme insouciant. Au milieu d’un groupe d’amis bien choisis – Axel Ibot, Gaston incisif et plein d’humour, Sandrine Westermann, Prudence délicieusement vulgaire, Adrien Couvez, comte de N., comique à tendance masochiste et Charlotte Ranson, capiteuse en Olympe – Amandine Albisson est, dès le début, plus une ballerine célébrée (peut être une Fanny Elssler) jouant de son charme, élégante et aguicheuse à la fois, qu’une simple courtisane. Le contraste est d’autant plus frappant que celle qui devrait jouer une danseuse, Sae Eun Park, ne brille que par son insipidité. Dommage pour Fabien Révillion dont la ligne s’accorde bien à celle d’Audric Bezard dans les confrontations Armand-Des Grieux.

Le pas-de-deux mauve fait des étincelles. Armand-Audric, intense, introduit dans ses pirouettes arabesque des décentrements vertigineux qui soulignent son exaltation mais également la violence de sa passion. Marguerite-Amandine, déjà conquise, essaye de garder son bouillant partenaire dans un jeu de séduction policé. Mais elle échoue à le contrôler. Son étonnement face aux élans de son partenaire nous fait inconditionnellement adhérer à leur histoire.

Le Bal à la robe rouge (une section particulièrement bien servie par le corps de ballet) va à merveille à Amandine Albisson qui y acquiert définitivement à nos yeux un vernis « Cachucha ».

Dans la scène à la campagne, les pas de deux Bezard-Albisson ont immédiatement une charge émotionnelle et charnelle. Audric Bezard accomplit là encore des battements détournés sans souci du danger.

L’élan naturel de ce couple est brisé par l’intervention du père (encore Yann Saïz). Amandine Albisson n’est pas dans l’imprécation mais immédiatement dans la supplication. Après la pose d’orante, qui radoucit la dignité offusquée de monsieur Duval, Albisson fait un geste pour se tenir le front très naturel. Puis elle semble pendre de tout son poids dans les bras de ses partenaires successifs, telle une âme exténuée.

C’est seulement avec la distribution Albisson-Bezard que l’on a totalement adhéré à la scène au bois et remarqué combien le ballet de John Neumeier était également construit comme une métaphore des saisons et du temps qui passe (le ballet commence à la fin de l’hiver et l’acte 1 annonce le printemps ; l’acte 2 est la belle saison et le 3 commence en automne pour s’achever en plein hiver). Dans cette scène, Albisson se montre livide, comme égarée. La rencontre est poignante : l’immobilité lourde de sens d’Armand (qui semble absent jusque dans son badinage avec Olympe), la main de Marguerite qui touche presque les cheveux de son ex-amant sont autant de détails touchants. Le pas de deux en noir affole par ses accélérations vertigineuses et par la force érotique de l’emmêlement des lignes. Audric Bezard est absolument féroce durant la scène du bal. C’est à ce moment qu’il tue sa partenaire. De dernières scènes, il ne nous reste que le l’impression dans la rétine du fard rouge de Marguerite rayonnant d’un éclat funèbre sous son voile noir.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

4 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

La Dame aux camélias, Chopin-Neumeier, Paris Opera Ballet, Palais Garnier, December 7th and 14th, 2018.

In Alexander Dumas Jr’s tale, two kinds of texts are paramount: a leather-bound copy of Manon Lescaut that gets passed from hand to hand, and then the so many other words that a young, loving, desperate, and dying courtesan scribbles down in defense of her right to love and be loved. John Neumeier’s ballet seeks to bring the unspoken to life.

*

*                                                     *

In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire/That on the ashes of […] youth doth lie […] Consumed with that which it was nourished by./ This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,/To love that well which thou must leave ere long.”
Shakepeare, Sonnet 73

Léonore Baulac, Mathieu Ganio, La Dame au camélias, December 7, 2018.

On December 7th, Léonore Baulac’s youthful and playful and feisty Marguerite evoked those posthumous stories on YouTube that memorialize a dead young person’s upbeat videos about living with cancer.

Normally, the bent-in elbows and wafting forearms are played as a social construct: “My hands say ‘blah, blah, blah.’ Isn’t that what you expect to hear?” Baulac used the repeated elbows-in gestures to release her forearms: the shapes that ensued made one think the extremities were the first part of her frame that had started to die, hands cupped in as if no longer able to resist the heavy weight of the air. Yet she kept seeking joy and freedom, a Traviata indeed.

The febrile energy of Baulac’s Marguerite responded quickly to Mathieu Ganio’s delicacy and fiery gentility, almost instantly finding calm whenever she could brush against the beauty of his body and soul. She could breathe in his arms and surrender to his masterful partnering. The spirit of Dumas Jr’s original novel about seize-the-day young people came to life. Any and every lift seemed controlled, dangerous, free, and freshly invented, as if these kids were destined to break into a playground at night.

From Bernhardt to Garbo to Fonteyn, we’ve seen an awful lot of actresses pretending that forty is the new twenty-four. Here that was not the case. Sometimes young’uns can act up a storm, too!

*                                                     *

Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,/Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.
Sonnet 66

Laura Hecquet, Florian Magnenet, La Dame aux camélias, December 14, 2018

On December 14th, Laura Hecquet indeed played older and wiser and more fragile and infinitely more melancholy and acceptant of her doom from the beginning than the rebellious Baulac. Even Hecquet’s first coughs seemed more like sneezes, as if she were allergic to her social destiny. I was touched by the way she often played at slow-mo ralentis that she could stitch in against the music as if she were reviewing the story of her life from the great beyond. For most of Act One Hecquet seemed too studied and poised. I wanted to shake her by the shoulders. I wondered if she would ever, ever just let go during the rest of the ballet. Maybe that was just her way of thinking Marguerite out loud? I would later realize that the way she kept delicately tracing micro-moods within moods defined the signature of her interpretation of Marguerite.

Only a Florian Magnenet – who has finally taken detailed control of all the lines of his body, especially his feet, yet who has held on to all of his his youthful energy and power – could awaken this sleeping beauty. At first he almost mauled the object of his desires in an eager need to shake her out of her clearly-defined torpor. Something began to click.

The horizontal swoops of the choreography suited this couple. Swirling mid-height lifts communicated to the audience exactly what swirling mid-height lifts embody: you’ve swept me off my feet. But Hecquet got too careful around the many vertical lifts that are supposed to mean even more. When you don’t just take a big gulp of air while saying to yourself “I feel light as a feather/hare krishna/you make me feel like dancin’!” and hurl your weight up to the rafters, you weigh down on your partner, no matter how strong he is. Nothing disastrous, nevertheless: unless the carefully-executed — rather than the ecstatic — disappoints you.

Something I noticed that I wish I hadn’t: Baulac took infinite care to tenderly sweep her fluffy skirts out of Ganio’s face during lifts and made it seem part of their play. Hecquet let her fluffy skirts go where they would to the point of twice rendering Magnenet effectively blind. Instead of taking care of him, Hecquet repeatedly concentrated on keeping her own hair off her face. I leave it to you as to the dramatic impact, but there is something called “telling your hairdresser what you want.” Should that fail, there is also a most useful object called “bobby-pin,” which many ballerinas have used before and has often proved less distracting to most of the audience.

*

*                                                     *

When thou reviewest this, thou dost review/ The very part was consecrate to thee./The earth can have but earth, which is his due;/My spirit is thine, the better part of me.
Sonnet 74

Of Manons and about That Father
Alexandre Dumas Jr. enfolded texts within texts in “La Dame aux camélias:” Marguerite’s diary, sundry letters, and a volume of l’Abbé Prévost’s both scandalous albeit moralizing novel about a young woman gone astray, “Manon Lescaut.” John Neumeier decided to make the downhill trajectory of Manon and her lover Des Grieux a leitmotif — an intermittent momento mori – that will literally haunt the tragedy of Marguerite and Armand. Manon is at first presented as an onstage character observed and applauded by the others on a night out,  but then she slowly insinuates herself into Marguerite’s subconscious. As in: you’ve become a whore, I am here to remind you that there is no way out.

On the 14th, Ludmila Pagliero was gorgeous. The only problem was that until the last act she seemed to think she was doing the MacMillan version of Manon. On the 7th, a more sensual and subtle Eve Grinsztajn gave the role more delicacy, but then provided real-time trouble. Something started to give out, and she never showed up on stage for the final pas de trois where Manon and des Grieux are supposed to ease Marguerite into accepting the inevitable. Bravo to Marc Moreau’s and Léonore Baulac’s stage smarts, their deep knowledge of the choreography, their acting chops, and their talent for improvisation. The audience suspected nothing. Most only imagined that Marguerite, in her terribly lonely last moments, found more comfort in fiction than in life.

Neumeier – rather cruelly – confines Armand’s father to sitting utterly still on the downstage right lip of the stage for too much of the action. Some of those cast in this role do appear to be thinking, or breathing at the very least. But on December 7th, even when called upon to move, the recently retired soloist Yann Saïz seemed made of marble, his eyes dead. Mr. Duval may be an uptight bourgeois, but he is also an honest provincial who has journeyed up from the South and is unused to Parisian ways. Saïz’s monolithic interpretation did indeed make Baulac seem even more vulnerable in the confrontation scene, much like a moth trying to break away by beating its wings against a pane of glass. But his stolid interpretation made me wonder whether those in the audience who were new to this ballet didn’t just think her opponent was yet another duke.

On December 14th, Andrey Klemm, who also teaches company class, found a way to embody a lifetime of regret by gently calibrating those small flutters of hands, the stuttering movements where you start in one direction then stop, sit down, pop up, look here, look there, don’t know what to do with your hands. Klemm’s interpretation of Mr. Duval radiated a back-story: that of a man who once, too, may have fallen inappropriately in love and been forced to obey society’s rules. As gentle and rueful as a character from Edith Wharton, you could understand that he recognized his younger self in his son.

Commentaires fermés sur La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Ma dose de ballet au cœur de l’été

15e World Ballet Festival – Tokyo Bunka Kaikan – soirée du 1er août

Le World Ballet Festival est une institution sans pareille : la première édition, en 1976, avait réuni – et ça n’avait sans doute pas été une mince affaire – Margot Fonteyn, Maïa Plissetskaïa et Alicia Alonso. Depuis, et environ tous les trois ans, une pléiade de danseurs parmi les plus prestigieux du moment convergent vers Tokyo pour une douzaine de représentations exceptionnelles. Cet été, le premier programme – présenté du 1er au 5 août – alignait pas moins de 37 solistes d’Europe et d’Amérique. L’assistance est à plus de 90% féminine (j’ai fait des pointages de rangée à l’entracte), à 99,9% japonaise (à vue de nez), et pas vraiment chic malgré le prix des billets (jusqu’à 26 000 yens, environ 200 €, en première catégorie). Il ne s’agit pas d’un auditoire mondain, mais d’une assemblée de vrais aficionados, dont certains sortent manifestement du bureau.

La soirée a pourtant tout du gala de luxe : du 18h à 22h15 (avec trois entractes au strict chronométrage), on aura vu 18 pas de deux et 2 solos, soutenus par un vrai et honorable orchestre (qui pèche tout de même par les vents et les percussions), et, quand besoin est, devant de vrais décors.

La loi du genre est qu’il y a, tout au long de la soirée, à boire et à manger. Quelques croûtes – notamment la Carmen Suite d’Alberto Alonso, interprétée par Tamara Rojo et Isaac Hernández –, un Forsysthe dansé n’importe comment (Herman Schmerman, vilainement banalisé par Polina Semionova et Friedemann Vogel), et un intermède contemporain en chaussettes dont le public peine à identifier le moment où il se termine (« … and Carolyn » d’Alan Lucien Øyen, par Aurélie Dupont, à qui on trouve de la présence, jusqu’à ce que son partenaire Daniel Proietto, qui en a dix fois plus, fasse son apparition).

Le plaisir de revoir quelques têtes connues l’emporte parfois sur l’esthétique des pièces présentées. Ainsi d’Elisa Badenes dansant Diane et Actéon (Vaganova) avec Daniel Camargo. La partie masculine verse dans l’héroïsme soviétique, mais la ballerine est piquante et fraîche comme un citron, et il est agréable de la voir donner la réplique à son ancien collègue de Stuttgart.

L’enchaînement des pièces varie intelligemment les humeurs, chaque partie terminant généralement par un duo brillant. Parmi les moments d’intériorité, on retient les bras immenses d’Iana Salenko dans la Mort du cygne, tout comme la performance arachnéenne d’Elisabet Ros dans le solo de La Luna (Béjart). Quelques extraits de Neumeier rappellent que la force dramatique des pas de deux tient beaucoup à l’expressivité des interprètes-fétiches du chorégraphe hambourgeois, qu’il s’agisse d’Anna Laudere et Edvin Revazov (Anna Karenina) ou de Silvia Azzoni avec Alexandre Riabko (Don Juan).

Sarah Lamb fait quelques jolis équilibres dans Coppélia (Arthur Saint-Léon, avec Federico Bonelli). David Hallberg ne convainc pas vraiment en Apollon musagète (avec Olesya Novikova) : on le trouve trop good boy et pas assez rock star. Le pas de deux de la Fille du Pharaon (Lacotte) me laisse froid, sans que j’arrive à démêler si la cause en est que Maria Alexandrova et Vladislav Lantratov ne sont pas vraiment mon type ou si, faute de familiarité avec ce ballet, le contexte émotionnel m’échappe.

Pour apprécier le pas de deux de l’acte blanc de Giselle, il faut en revanche convoquer toutes les ressources de son imagination : Maria Kochetkova – beaux bras implorants et joli ballon – et Daniil Simkin – très fluide, voilà encore un interprète à la danse naturelle – plaident leur cause devant une Myrtha et des Willis aussi inflexibles qu’absentes. Et pourtant, ça marche ! Autre surprise, Roberto Bolle me déplaît moins qu’à l’habitude, sans doute parce que l’adage du Caravaggio de Mauro Bigonzetti, qu’il danse avec Melissa Hamilton, est suffisamment conventionnel pour qu’il y paraisse à son aise…

Trêve de paradoxe, passons aux vraies joies de la soirée. Ashley Bouder est toujours irrésistible de rouerie dans Tarantella (avec un Leonid Sarafanov à l’unisson, même s’il peut difficilement passer pour italien). Dans After the rain, Alessandra Ferri est tellement alanguie et lyrique dans son pas de deux avec Marcelo Gomes qu’on a l’impression de les voir évoluer dans un monde liquide. Dans la même veine, Alina Cojocaru remporte aussi une mention spéciale pour la sensuelle complicité de son partenariat avec Johan Kobborg dans Schéhérazade (Liam Scarlett).

Et puis il y a les petits français ! Au cœur de la deuxième partie, Léonore Baulac et Germain Louvet dansent le Casse-Noisette de Noureev avec style, mais bien trop prudemment. Mlle Baulac termine sa variation par un manège de piqués négocié si lentement à l’orchestre que c’en devient gênant. En fin de soirée, Dorothée Gilbert en Manon et Mathieu Ganio en Des Grieux livrent un complice pas de deux de la chambre. C’est joli mais frustrant : c’est l’évolution de la relation entre les personnages au fil des actes qui fait tout le sel du ballet de MacMillan.

Enfin, Myriam Ould-Braham et Mathias Heymann dansent – en rouge et noir – la scène du mariage de Don Quichotte, qu’ils ont interprété avec le Tokyo Ballet quelques jours auparavant. Et c’est alors que le spectateur parisien se rend compte à quel point il était en manque de ces deux-là, et de la tendresse badine de leur partenariat. Même moins brillant qu’à l’habitude (au soir du 1er août, il fait partir son manège de manière trop centrale pour qu’il ait de l’ampleur), Heymann reste impressionnant de précision et de moelleux. De son côté, la ballerine donne tout ce qu’il faut dans le rôle : chic des épaulements, humour des œillades, désinvolture dans le maniement de l’éventail (d’un aveuglant orange-soleil), musicalité dans les retirés, joliesse des fouettés. Que demander de plus ?

Commentaires fermés sur Ma dose de ballet au cœur de l’été

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs)

Programme Ravel : géométrie variable

Benjamin Millepied, Maurice Béjart. Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Soirée du jeudi 1er mars 2018.

Le programme Millepied-Béjart a pour lui le mérite de la cohérence. Unifié par deux partitions de Maurice Ravel créées pour ou dans la mouvance des Ballets Russes de Serge de Diaghilev, il met à l’honneur deux chorégraphes français qui ont bâti l’essentiel de leur notoriété à l’extérieur de l’hexagone et qui ont tous deux eu des rapports complexes avec l’Opéra. L’un en a refusé deux fois la direction et le second l’a abandonnée en début de mandat.

Que reste-t-il de l’enthousiasme qui avait présidé à la création de Daphnis et Chloé en 2014, alors que son chorégraphe venait d’être désigné comme successeur de Brigitte Lefèvre ? Guère que des cendres. Et que reste-t-il de ce ballet et de sa scénographie par Daniel Buren ? Comme alors, le jeu d’ombres chinoises géométriques sur le rideau d’avant-scène fait son petit effet. Le chromatisme du plasticien opère un charme réel ; il a quelque chose du panthéisme qu’on trouve dans la musique. La chorégraphie de Millepied séduit toujours par sa fluidité. Les enroulements déroulements des couples du corps de ballet sont plaisants. Leurs déplacements épousent bien les vagues orchestrales de la musique de Ravel. Le ballet manque cependant parfois de tension. La faute n’en revient peut-être pas qu’au chorégraphe. Il y a des sections entières de la partition de Daphnis et Chloé qui n’appellent pas la danse. En 1912, il semble que l’on attendait déjà beaucoup de l’enchantement visuel que produiraient les décors de Léon Bakst. Benjamin Millepied ne parvient pas à surprendre suffisamment dans ces passages (qui précèdent puis succèdent à l’enlèvement de Chloé par le pirate Bryaxis) : la théorie de filles en tulle blanc se laisse regarder sans créer d’effets mémorables et la succession de deux pas de deux entre Daphnis et Chloé frise la redondance.

L’action du ballet comporte également une tare. Comme dans Sylvia de Delibes-Mérante, ce n’est pas le héros qui délivre sa bien aimée mais un dieu (Éros dans Sylvia, ici le dieu Pan), Daphnis est donc cantonné dans un rôle purement décoratif. Le couple formé par Dorothée Gilbert et Mathieu Ganio est tout velours et coton mais il échoue à éveiller mon intérêt. Il en est de même pour le second couple, la courtisane Lycénion et le pataud Dorcon. Alessio Carbone est trop gracieux en berger jaloux pour parvenir à convaincre. Dans sa « variation-concours », ses départs de sauts ne sont pas assez affirmés et ses chutes trop précautionneuses. François Alu, c’était attendu, casse la baraque dans le rôle du pirate, avec sa sûreté habituelle mais aussi son manque de grâce revendiqué. Sa scène d’intimidation avec Gilbert est effrayante à souhait.

Mais le vrai plaisir qui domine pour cette reprise est celui de revoir des figures qui se sont fait rares depuis le départ du chorégraphe-ex directeur Millepied : Adrien Couvrez, Allister Madin bien sûr, mais surtout Eléonore Guérineau. En blanc ou en jaune, sa danse incendie le plateau et son ballon vous transporte. Nymphe, dryade ou bacchante, elle est simplement unique.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

*

 *                                                  *

Créé pour Ida Rubinstein, le Boléro montrait une danseuse espagnole dansant sur la table ronde d’une taverne et excitant le désir de l’assemblée. Les décors, très couleur locale étaient d’Alexandre Benois et la chorégraphie (avec combat au couteau entre hommes, s’il vous plait) de Nijinska.

Le génie de Maurice Béjart aura été de s’éloigner fort peu de ce dispositif tout en l’épurant à l’extrême. Une table rouge réduite à son plateau, une série de chaises avec des hommes torse nu dans toutes les positions et nuances caractéristiques du mâle en chasse, deux spots, une combinaison en ostinato de coupés-relevés, quelques port de mains serpentins, un grand écart facial. De tous ces petits riens naît un immense tout pour peu que l’interprète s’y prête.

Ce n’est hélas pas le cas pour Marie-Agnès Gillot qui tente la stratégie de la théâtralité moindre pour le plus d’effet. Mais elle fait chou blanc. Le jeu des mains, immenses, fait bien son petit effet au début. On se prend à espérer l’araignée hypnotique ou la créature tentaculaire. Mais ensuite, l’interpètre semble absorbée dans un exercice intériorisé qui se voudrait peut-être rituel de la devadâsî du temple mais qui évoque plutôt la routine de la danseuse sous-payée et fatiguée dans un cabaret pour touristes. Du coup, les garçons qui s’amoncellent et se déhanchent graduellement autour de la table semblent plutôt être des collègues consciencieux que des mâles poussés sur les bords du précipice orgasmique. C’est dommage car ils se donnent sans compter. On s’est pris à espérer à plusieurs reprises que Vincent Chaillet ou Audric Bezard indifféremment, voire simultanément, sautent sur la table pour y mettre un peu du feu qui lui manquait cruellement.

C’était peut-être la dernière fois que je voyais Marie-Agnès Gillot. Personnellement, j’ai toujours pensé que cette danseuse s’était trompée de carrière lorsqu’elle s’était laissée consacrer « contemporaine ». Elle avait tout pour être une époustouflante ballerine classique. Dans le contemporain, elle n’aura finalement été qu’un grand corps doué de plus qui évolue en mesure.

Marie-Agnès Gillot. Au centre de la table mais pas forcément au centre d’intérêt.

 

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique