Archives de Tag: Florent Melac

“Some enchanted evening/you may see …” (My spring season at the Paris Opera)

Just who wouldn’t want to be wandering about dressed in fluffy chiffon and suddenly encounter a gorgeous man in a forest glade under the moonlight? Um, today, that seems creepy. But not in the 19th century, when you would certainly meet a gentleman on one enchanted evening…« Who can explain it, who can tell you why? Fools give you reasons, wise men never try. »

Notes about the classics that were scheduled for this spring and summer season — La Bayadère, Midsummer Night’s Dream, Giselle — on call from April through July.

*

 *                                     *

P1180305

After the confinement, filmed rehearsals, and then two live runs in succession, DOES ANYONE STILL WANT TO HEAR ABOUT LA BAYADERE? But maybe you are still Dreaming or Giselling, too?

Here are my notes.

Bayaderes

« Some enchanted evening, you may see a stranger across a crowded room. And somehow you know, you know even then, That somehow you’ll see her again and again. »

April 21

In La Bayadère, if Ould-Braham’s Nikiya was as soft and naïve and childlike as Giselle. Bleuenn Batistoni’s  Gamzatti proved as hard and sleek as a modern-day Bathilde: an oligarch’s brat. [Albeit most of those kinds of women do not lift up their core and fill out the music]. Their interactions were as clear and bright and graphic as in a silent movie (in the good sense).

OB’s mind is racing from the start, telling a story to herself and us, desperate to know how this chapter ends. Partnering with the ardent Francesco Mura was so effortless, so “there in the zone.” He’s one of those who can speak even when his back is turned to you and live when he is off to the side, out of the spotlight. Mura is aflame and in character all the time.

OB snake scene, iridescent, relives their story from a deep place  plays with the music and fills out the slow tempi. Only has eyes for Mura and keeps reaching, reaching, her arms outlining the shape of their dances at the temple (just like Giselle. She’s not Nikiya but a  Gikiya).

Indeed, Batistoni’s turn at Gamzatti in the second act became an even tougher bitch with a yacht, as cold-blooded as Bathilde can sometimes be:  a Bamzatti. There was no hope left for Ould-Braham and Francesco Mura in this cruel world of rich fat cats, and they both knew it.

April 3

Park  as Nikiya and later as Giselle will channel the same dynamic: sweet girl: finallly infusing some life into her arms in Act 1, then becoming stiff as a board when it gets to the White Act, where she exhibits control but not a drop of the former life of her character. I am a zombie now. Dry, clinical, and never builds up to any fortissimo in the music. A bit too brisk and crisp and efficient a person to incarnate someone once called Nikiya. Could the audience tell it was the same dancer when we got to Act 3?

Good at leaps into her partner’s arms, but then seems to be a dead weight in lifts. When will Park wake up?

Paul Marque broke through a wall this season and finds new freedom in acting through his body. In Act Three: febrile, as “nervosa” as an Italian racecar. Across the acts, he completes a fervent dramatic arc than is anchored in Act 1.

Bourdon’s Gamzatti very contained. The conducting was always too slow for her. Dancing dutifully. Where is her spark?

*

 *                                     *

P1180391

Midsummer Night Dreams

« Some enchanted evening, someone may be laughing, You may hear her laughing across a crowded room. And night after night, as strange as it seems, The sound of her laughter will sing in your dreams. »

June 30

Very baroque-era vivid conducting.

Aurelien Gay as Puck: feather light.

Pagliero’s Titania is clearly a queen, calm and scary. But also a woman, pliant and delightful.

Jeremy Loup-Quer as Oberon has heft and presence. Dances nicely. Smooth, but his solos are kind of like watching class combinations. (Balanchine’s choreography for the role is just that, basically)

First Butterfly Sylvia Saint-Martin displayed no authority and did the steps dutifully.

Paris Opera Ballet School kiddie corps has bounce and go and delicate precision, bravo.

Bezard/Demetrius in a wig worthy of a Trocks parody. Whyyyy? Particularly off-putting in the last act wedding scene. Who would want to marry a guy disguised as Mireille Matthieu?

Bourdon/Hyppolita unmusical fouettés. I miss her warmth and panache. Gone.

Act 2 Divertissement Pas where the couple appears out of nowhere in the “story.” (see plot summary). The way Louvet extends out and gently grasps Ould-Braham’s hand feels as if he wants to hold on to the music. Both pay heed and homage to the courtly aspect of the Mendelssohn score. That delicacy that was prized by audiences after the end of the Ancien Régime can be timeless. Here the ballerina was really an abstract concept: a fully embodied idea, an ideal woman, a bit of perfect porcelain to be gently cupped into warm hands. I like Ould-Braham and Louvet’s new partnership.  They give to each other.

July 12

Laura Hequet as Helena gestures from without not from within, as is now usual the rare times she takes the stage. It’s painful to watch, as if her vision ends in the studio. Does she coach Park?

Those who catch your eye:

Hannah O’Neill as Hermia and Célia Drouy as Hyppolita. The first is radiant, the second  oh so plush! Hope Drouy will not spend her career typecast as Cupid in Don Q.

In the Act II  Divertissment, this time with Heloise Bourdon, Louvet is much less reverential and more into gallant and playful give and take. These two had complimentary energy. Here Louvet was more boyish than gentlemanly. I like how he really responds to his actresses these days.

Here the pas de deux had a 20th century energy: teenagers rather than allegories. Teenagers who just want to keep on dancing all night long.

NB Heloise Bourdon was surprisingly stiff at first, as if she hadn’t wanted to be elected prom queen, then slowly softened her way of moving. But this was never to be the legato unspooling that some dancers have naturally. I was counting along to the steps more than I like to. Bourdon is sometimes too direct in attack and maybe also simply a bit discouraged these days. She’s been  “always the bridesmaid but never the bride” — AKA not promoted to Etoile — for waaay too long now.  A promotion would let her break out and shine as she once used to.

My mind wandered. Why did the brilliant and over-venerated costume designer Karinska assign the same wreath/crown of flowers (specifically Polish in brightness) to both Bottom in Act I and then to the Act II  Female Allegory of Love? In order to cut costs by recycling a headdress ? Some kind of inside joke made for Mr. B? Or was this joke invented by Christian Lacroix?

*

 *                                     *

img_2046

Giselles

« Some enchanted evening, when you find your true love, When you hear her call across a crowded room, Then fly to her side and make her your own, Or all through your life you may dream all alone.. »

 July 6

 Sae Eun Park/Paul Marque

 Sae Eun Park throws all the petals of the daisy already, does not lower the “he loves me” onto her skirt. There goes one of the main elements of the mad scene.

Her authoritative variations get explosions of applause due to obvious technical facility , plus that gentle smile and calm demeanor that are always on display.

What can Paul Marque’s Albrecht do when faced with all this insipid niciness? I’ve been a bad boy? He does try during the mad scene, shows real regret.

Ninon Raux’s Berthe:  gentle and dignified and not disdainful.

Park’s mad scene was admired by those around me at the top of the house. Many neophites. They admired from afar but not one of those I surveyed at the end of Act I said they had cried when her character died. Same thing at the end of the ballet while we reconnected and loitered around on the front steps of the Palais Garnier.  I asked again. No tears. Only admiration. That’s odd.

On the upside, the Paris Opera has a real thing with bourrées (piétinées), Each night, Myrtha and Giselle gave a plethora of what seemed almost like skateboard or surfing slides. They skimmed over a liquid ground with buttery feet whether forward, backward, or to the side. I think a new standard was set.

In her variations, Hannah O’Neill’s Myrtha gave us a will o’ the wisp of lightly churning jétés. She darted about like the elusive light of a firefly. Alas, where I was sitting behind a cornice meant a blocked view of downstage left, so I missed all of this Wili Queen’s acting for the rest of Act II.

Daniel Stokes’s Hilarion was not desperate enough.

Despite the soaring sweep of the cello, I don’t feel the music in Park-Marque’s Giselle-Albrecht’s pas de deux.  Not enough flow. Marque cared, but Park so careful. No abandon. No connection. The outline of precise steps.

July 11

 Alice Renavand/Mathieu Ganio

Act I

Battistoni/Magliono peasant pas: Turns into attitude, curve of the neck, BB swooshes and swirls into her attitudes and hops. As if this all weren’t deliberate or planned but something quite normal. AM’s dance felt earthbound.

Renavand fresh, plush, youthful, beautiful, and effortlessly mastering the technique (i.e. you felt the technique was all there,  but didn’t start to analyse it). I like to think that Carlotta Grisi exhaled this same kind of naturalness.

ACT II

The detail that may have been too much for Renavand’s body to stand five times in a row: instead of quick relevé passes they were breathtakingly high sissones/mini-gargoullades…as if she was trying to dance as hard as Albrecht in order to save him (Mathieu Ganio,, in top form and  manly and protective and smitten from start to stop with his Giselle. Just like all the rest of us)

Roxane Stojanov’s Myrtha? Powerful. Knows when a musical combination has its punch-line, knows how to be still yet attract the eye. She continues to be one to watch.

July 16

 Myriam Ould-Braham/Germain Louvet

Act I :

A gentle and sad and elegant Florent Melac/Hilarion, clearly in utter admiration of the local beauty. Just a nice guy without much of a back story with Giselle but a guy who dreams about what might have been.

Ould-Braham a bit rebellious in her interactions with mum. This strong-minded choice of Albrecht above all will carry into the Second Act. Myrtha will be a kind of hectoring female authority figure. A new kind of mother. So the stage is set.

Peasant pas had the same lightness as the lead couple. As if the village were filled with sprites and fairies.

Peasant pas: finally a guy with a charisma and clean tours en l’air:  who is this guy with the lovely deep plié? Axel Magliano from the 11th!  This just goes to show you, never give up on a dancer. Like all of us, we can have a day when we are either on or off. Only machines produce perfect copies at every performance.

Bluenn Battistoni light and balanced and effortless. She’s not a machine, just lively and fearless. That spark hasn’t been beaten out of her by management. yet.

O-B’s mad scene: she’s angry-sad, not abstracted, not mad. She challenges Albrecht with continued eye contact.

Both their hearts are broken.

Act II:

This Hilarion, Florent Melac, weighs his steps and thoughts to the rhythm of the church bells. Never really listened to a Hilarion’s mind  before.

Valentine Colasante is one powerful woman. And her Myrtha’s impatience with men kind of inspires me.

O-B and Germain Louvet both so very human. O-B’s “tears” mime so limpid and clear.

GL: all he wants is to catch and hold her one more time. And she also yearns to be caught and cherished.  All of their dance is about trying to hold on to their deep connection. This is no zombie Giselle. When the church bells sang the song of dawn, both of their eyes widened in awe and wonder and yearning at the same time. Both of their eyes arms reached out in perfect harmony and together traced the outline of that horizon to the east where the sun began to rise. It was the end, and they clearly both wanted to go back to the beginning of their story.

*

 *                                     *

What would you do, if you could change the past?

« Once you have found her, never let her go. Once you have found her, never let her go. »

The quotations are from the Rogers and Hammerstein Broadway musical called
« South Pacific » from 1949.

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Roland Petit à l’Opéra : histoires d’interprètes

Programme Hommage à Roland Petit. Palais Garnier. Représentations du vendredi 2 et du mercredi 7 juillet 2021.

P1170818

Rideau de scène du Rendez-Vous. Pablo Picasso

Un mois après les premières représentations, de retour à Garnier, on s’étonne du regard nouveau qu’on peut porter sur le Rendez-Vous. Ce ballet, un peu frelaté, un peu réchauffé, reprenait de l’intérêt dans deux distributions très différentes. Le 2 juillet, Florent Melac, qui nous avait paru bien pâle en Escamillo le 3 juin, incarnait le jeune homme du Rendez-vous de manière très juvénile et touchante : avec un joli mélange de clarté de lignes, de souplesse (ses attitudes qu’il projette vers sa tête sont presque féminines) et de sensibilité à fleur de peau, le danseur émouvait dans le rôle du puceau malchanceux à la recherche de sa première passion. L’ensemble de la distribution était d’ailleurs du même acabit. Le Destin de Nathan Bisson paraissait bien jeune lui aussi. Ainsi, pendant la rencontre à l’ombre du pilier du métro aérien, le jeune et son persécuteur partageaient une forme de gémellité : Florent Melac semblait interagir avec son propre cadavre. Roxane Stojanov, fine comme une liane dans sa robe noire, dégageait un parfum douceâtre et vénéneux. Le pas de deux dans ses intrications de bras et de jambes devenait un subtil jeu de nœud-coulant, sensuel en diable.

Le 7 juillet, la dynamique est tout autre. Alexandre Gasse n’est en aucun cas un jeune poète des Sylphides égaré dans un film néoréaliste comme Ganio ou un tendron en recherche d’amour. Son Jeune Homme est néanmoins absolument satisfaisant. Sa danse pleine, énergique et masculine lui donne un côté plus terre à terre. Il est le seul à montrer clairement comment la prophétie fatale l’isole des autres. Cela rend son association avec le bossu (le vaillant et bondissant Hugo Vigliotti qu’on aura vu les 4 fois dans ce rôle) plus intime et par là-même plus poignante. Aurélien Houette, qu’on avait déjà vu et apprécié dans le Destin, se montre absolument effroyable avec un sourire éclatant, dans une complète jouissance du mal et de la souffrance morale qu’il inflige. La connexion avec Alexandre Gasse est évidente : on sent ce dernier complètement agi par son partenaire et réduit à l’état de marionnette. Amandine Albisson, en Plus belle fille du monde, se montre sensuelle dès son entrée. Soyeuse comme sa robe, elle n’est pas une jeune fille et clairement une « professionnelle ». Le pas de deux entre elle et Gasse prend la forme d’une parade amoureuse. Il y a l’approche et les préliminaires, les premiers frottements qui conduisent à l’acte sexuel. Les poses suggestives suivies de pâmoisons voulues par Petit évoquent l’acte lui-même. Le coup de rasoir ne figure rien d’autre que l’orgasme. On frissonne quand on était resté de marbre avec la distribution de la première.

P1170836

Le Jeune Homme et la Mort. Décor. Paysage après la bataille.

Etonnamment, l’alchimie qui manquait au couple Renavand-Ganio dans Le Rendez-vous était justement au rendez-vous du Jeune Homme et la Mort. Mathieu Ganio mettant l’accent sur la pesanteur dans tous les nombreux moments de musculation du ballet (soulèvement de la chaise, traction de la table) rend palpable le poids du destin qui pèse sur le lui. Alice Renavand, quant à elle, déploie un legato dans les ralentis qui matérialise à l’avance la conclusion inéluctable du ballet. Le couple ménage des temps d’attente très sensuels (la pointe sur l’entrejambe du danseur ou la pose de la danseuse en écart facial, accrochée face au bassin de son partenaire). Alice Renavand souffle très bien le chaud et le froid. Mathieu Ganio répond à ces sollicitations contradictoires avec une belle expressivité. A un moment, tapant du pied, il a un mouvement d’imprécation avec ses deux paumes de main ouvertes ; une invite de la femme et ses mains se décrispent évoquant désormais une supplique avant de se tendre, avides vers l’objet de son désir… Après une dernière agacerie explicite de la femme en jaune, son jeune homme se rend compte du jeu pervers de sa partenaire. Il ressemble désormais à une phalène qui essaierait d’échapper à l’attraction de la lanterne qui la tuera. Ayant assis le jeune homme sur sa chaise, Renavand ne pianote pas discrètement sur le dos de son partenaire comme le faisait Dorothée Gilbert avec Mathias Heymann. Elle martèle impitoyablement son clavier l’air de dire : « N’as-tu pas enfin compris ? ». Le couple Renavand-Ganio ne vous laisse jamais oublier la potence qui trône dans la chambre de l’artiste martyr.

P1170973

Carmen. Scène finale.

Carmen était sans doute la principale raison pour laquelle on avait repris des places pour le programme Petit et la distribution du 2 juillet était particulièrement attendue. Amandine Albisson comme Audric Bezard avaient déjà interprété les rôles principaux de ce ballet chacun avec un partenaire différent. Amandine Albisson m’avait séduit par son élégance très second degré dans un rôle trop souvent sujet à débordements le 2 juin face à Stéphane Bullion tandis qu’Audric Bezard m’avait donné le vertige par la violence assumée de son interprétation le jour suivant aux côtés de Ludmila Pagliero. Ces deux interprétations ne pouvaient s’accorder et on était curieux des ajustements que les deux artistes, qui nous avaient déjà conquis dans Onéguine ou La Dame aux camélias, allaient apporter à leur vision du rôle. Et le petit miracle attendu a eu lieu. Amandine Albisson incarne ainsi, sans perdre de sa subtilité, une Carmen beaucoup plus sûre de sa féminité et manipulatrice. Don-Bezard reste dévoré de passion mais celle-ci est plus saine et peut être aussi plus poignante car elle est davantage guidée par un sincère attachement amoureux que par un simple désir de possession. Dans la scène de la chambre, il dévore sa Carmen des yeux lorsqu’elle remet ses bas avec une affectation calculée et regrette immédiatement son geste après l’avoir jetée au sol. La dernière partie du pas de deux y gagne en tendresse et en sensualité. La scène de l’arène enfin ressemble plus à une querelle d’amants qui tourne mal (la Carmen d’Albisson ne considère jamais sérieusement le bellâtre Escamillo, subtilement délivré mais avec gusto par Mathieu Contat) : les coups de pieds et les baffes pleuvent des deux côtés dans un crescendo de violence impressionnant. Le coup de couteau final et la dernière étreinte laissent un Don José hébété, comme s’il prenait conscience de sa désormais inéluctable incomplétude.

La salle ne s’y trompe pas qui récompense le couple par une véritable ovation.

Aurais-je dû en rester à cette incarnation d’exception ? Voilà ce que je me demandais le 7 juillet pendant la scène des cigarières. Hannah O’Neill et Florian Magnenet parviendraient-ils à emporter mon adhésion après le couple Albisson-Bezard ? La réponse est oui. Magnenet comme O’Neill prennent le parti de la clarté technique, du classicisme et de l’élégance. Don Florian, dans sa première variation, s’emploie même à accentuer sa partition très exactement sur les éructations « l’aaaamour » du corps de ballet. Pour sa variation de la taverne, Hannah-Carmencita prend le parti de jouer « cygne noir ». Elle porte beaucoup de paillettes sur ses cheveux et s’emploie à finir de les éparpiller en s’époussetant le dessus de la tête avec son éventail. Pour la scène de la chambre, les deux danseurs nous transportent dans le temps. Lorsque le rideau jaune s’entrouvre, il est clair qu’on n’en est pas aux délices de la première nuit d’amour. L’ambiance est clairement morose entre les deux amants et on assiste à une dispute suivi d’un fragile rabibochage. O’Neill ne baisse la garde qu’après les baisers et, s’il n’est pas dénué de sensualité, l’acte sexuel évoqué par la fin du pas de deux sent la lassitude des corps et des âmes.

Faire de Don José un voleur et un meurtrier aura été pour Carmen un travail de longue haleine. Dans sa courte variation du poignard, Magnenet semble encore adresser une prière à l’arme blanche, à moins que ce ne soit une supplique à Dieu. Durant la Scène de l’arène le Don José de Magnenet menace-t-il sérieusement la Carmen d’O’Neill ? Il se laisse certes emporter par sa colère mais la scène devient comme une scène chambre poussée à l’extrême. Carmen prend conscience du danger avant son amant. Poignardée, elle frétille des pieds comme une bête prise au piège. Don José fixe les mains de sa victime, hébété. Il réalise seulement quand elles se détachent de ses mains et tombent au sol, inertes, qu’il a tué. Carmen aurait-elle réussi au-delà de ses espérances son œuvre de dévoiement d’une âme pure ?

Même les programmes un peu bancals, ainsi celui d’Hommage à Roland Petit à l’Opéra, peuvent ainsi, à la revoyure, réserver quelques bonnes surprises quand il sont portés par des artistes inspirés…

Commentaires fermés sur Roland Petit à l’Opéra : histoires d’interprètes

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Programme Sugimoto-Forsythe : Nô Man’s Land

Programme Hiroshi Sugimoto – William Forsythe. Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Palais Garnier. Dimanche 13 octobre 2019.

Les incursions de la danse classique occidentale dans la culture japonaise sont souvent hasardeuses. Le contemplatif hiératique sied mal à une forme d’art qui a souvent mis l’accent sur les déploiements de vitesse, les passages multiples d’une pose à une autre jusque dans l’adage, et sur une forme d’exaltation athlétique. Chez Georges Balanchine (Bukaku, 1963), cela donne une curiosité orientaliste très classique surtout mémorable pour les décors de David Hays et les costumes de Karinska. En 1972, Jerome Robbins offrait à un Edward Villella, très diminué après une opération de hanche, l’occasion de remonter sur scène. Plus documenté que Balanchine, Robbins tombe dans l’ennui le plus total : il faut quinze minutes au personnage principal pour tomber le peignoir et une comparse féminine passe de longues minutes étendue sur une serviette. Villella lui-même n’a pas gardé un bon souvenir de la création.

À l’Opéra de Paris, la grande incursion dans le théâtre Nô aura été Le Martyre de saint Sébastien (1988), mis en scène par Bob Wilson pour Mickaël Denard et Sylvie Guillem. Cette pièce fut l’occasion de belles photographies : Guillem en Saint Sébastien androgyne en contrapposto sur le poteau d’exécution ou Denard en petit marin. Le spectacle lui-même désarçonna ou ennuya prodigieusement une partie du public. À Bob Wilson qui lui proposait de faire un autre projet de ce genre, la jeune mais déjà très acerbe Guillem répondit : « Seulement si vous engagez un chorégraphe ». Il paraît que Bob Wilson n’avait pas apprécié.

*

 *                                                                  *

Avec At The Hawk’s Well, « Mise en scène, scénographie, lumières » du plasticien photographe Hiroshi Sugimoto, on navigue entre ces Charybde et Scylla. L’artiste est japonais, mais il met en images une pièce orientaliste de 1916 de l’écrivain anglais William Butler Yeats.

Visuellement, cette œuvre est déjà furieusement datée. On a vu traîner partout les planchers centraux avançant sur des fosses d’orchestre vides, et les cycloramas incurvés. Les danseurs sont rendus méconnaissables par des maquillages et des perruques qui feraient paraître presque sobres les costumes de Jean Cocteau pour le Phèdre de Serge Lifar. Les solistes sont affublés de capes en toile cirée irisée. Même Audric Bézard, affligé d’une barbe grise, a le sex appeal en berne. Un comble. Le costume d’Amandine Albisson est d’un rouge qui rappelle le toujours très troublant académique de l’Oiseau de feu de Béjart ; seulement on y a multiplié les trous sans démultiplier l’effet produit. Bien au contraire.

À la différence de Bob Wilson pour son « Martyre », Hiroshi Sugimoto s’est adjoint les services d’un chorégraphe pour meubler les compositions musicales planantes à basses forcées dans l’air du temps de Ryoji Ikeda. On a pu s’offusquer que le nom d’Alessio Silvestrin n’apparaissait pas sur l’affiche. C’était avant de voir sa chorégraphie. Le vocabulaire est en effet réduit à la portion congrue : beaucoup de grands développés, de piqués-arabesque et des détournés en veux-tu en-voilà. Les ensembles sans surprises pour six filles et six garçons se répartissant sagement des deux côtés du plancher sont gentiment foutraques. Quant au pas de deux entre Amandine Albisson (femme-épervier) et Axel Magliano (le Jeune Homme), il manque totalement d’énergie. Alessio Silvestrin, qui a passé trois ans chez Forsythe, a accouché d’une chorégraphie vieillotte qui fait plutôt penser à du mauvais Karole Armitage.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Les deux-tiers du programme vendu sont consacrés à nous expliquer ce coûteux objet que vient d’acquérir l’Opéra. Ces publications qui, jadis, étaient une sorte d’oasis d’information dans un paysage éditorial sinistré, deviennent de plus en plus creuses et prétentieuses : on y lit des phrases inoubliables du genre : « À l’inverse de William Forsythe, Alessio Silvestrin ne renonce pas à la possibilité d’une narration »… Le fait que Silvestrin suive un « argument » ne fait pas de sa danse quelque chose de « narratif », même quand on s’abrite derrière le No et « l’abstraction subjective » (qui est plutôt l’apanage d’un Balanchine ou d’un Forsythe…). A mesure qu’on avance, les programmes de l’Opéra deviennent toujours plus épais et encombrants tandis que leur contenu frôle désormais l’indigence. On n’y compte plus le nombre de double-pages restées blanches aux deux-tiers ou imprimées de monochromes. Si l’Opéra veut produire des livres d’art, au moins pourrait-il soigner la qualité du papier…

*

 *                                                                  *

Blake Works I. Saluts

Après ce premier pensum de 40 minutes, on espérait retrouver espoir avec la reprise, très attendue, de Blake Works I qui avait enchanté notre année 2016.

Las ! Il semble que le maître ait décidé d’accorder les tonalités de son œuvre à l’ambiance générale du ballet d’ouverture. A la création et lors de la reprise la saison suivante, on avait été désarçonné puis conquis par l’ambiance presque solaire de la pièce. Mais ici, la tonalité des lumières nous a paru beaucoup plus sombre, plus conforme à la semi-pénombre d’autres pièces de pièces de Forsythe. L’éclairage en douche, prédominant au détriment de celui venant des coulisses, écrase les évolutions par vagues latérales des danseuses et danseurs dans « Forest Fire ». Dans le pas de trois sur « Put That Away », je me souvenais de plus de sauts et de tours planés. Dans cette ambiance crépusculaire, le pas de trois (sans la subtile entente que déployaient jadis mesdemoiselles Osmont et Gautier de Charnacé) ressemble à une sorte de « Flegmatique » new age ou aux « Castagnettes » d’Agon. Marion Barbeau qui remplace Ludmila Pagliero, réquisitionné en première distribution pour le Sugimoto et la création de Crystal Pite, est très musicale mais n’a pas la gargouillade jouissive de sa devancière. Du coup, on remarque surtout Léonore Baulac qui, elle, domine la partition créée sur elle en 2016. Son duo sur « Colors in Anything » avec Florent Melac en remplacement de François Alu est une bonne surprise. On regrette bien sûr le côté « Ours et la Poupée » de l’original, mais il se dégage une vraie élégie de ce pas de deux. La redistribution des rôles ne nous convainc pas non plus. En plus de la partie de Pagliero, Barbeau danse le pas de trois avec Legasa. Dans le pas-de-deux final, elle a Florian Melac pour partenaire en lieu et place de Germain Louvet. On aimait le contraste entre les deux pas de deux pour deux couples totalement différents. Ici, on ne sait pas trop quoi faire de ce final…

« Two men’s down », pourtant plongé dans la quasi-obscurité, est ainsi le seul moment de la soirée où on a pu se laisser emporter : Hugo Marchand virevoltant et fluide, Paul Marque, jusque-là invisible, accentuant joliment dans ce passage les syncopes de la musique, et Pablo Legasa accomplissant d’impressionnants tours à la seconde avec la jambe au-delà de la ligne des hanches.

Blake Works I : dans la pénombre

Littéralement assommée par la première partie, la salle reste, même pendant ce passage, désespérément atone.

Je comprends. Pour ma part, entre ce programme et les représentations du musée d’Orsay, je pense bien avoir assisté à la plus lugubre des ouvertures de saison de mes quelques trente années de balletomanie…

Commentaires fermés sur Programme Sugimoto-Forsythe : Nô Man’s Land

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Agon, Grand Miroir, Le Sacre : les intermittences du plaisir

Soirées Balanchine Teschigawara Bausch. Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Palais Garnier. Vendredi 3 novembre et samedi 4 novembre 2017.

Dans cette soirée Balanchine / Teshigawara / Bausch, pour laquelle on serait bien en peine de trouver un fil conducteur, l’un des points principaux de contentement est l’excellente tenue de la reprise d’Agon de Balanchine. Lors de la dernière série, en 2012, le ballet de l’Opéra en avait un peu trop raboté les aspérités. En 2017, on retrouve avec un plaisir paradoxal l’inconfort de ce ballet baroque cubiste car il est dansé avec beaucoup plus d’acuité. Des trois pièces, Agon a beau être la doyenne, celle qui utilise le plus l’idiome classique (entendez que les danseuses dansent sur pointe), elle reste cependant la plus exigeante. On sent que le public ne sait pas trop quoi faire de ce mélange de familier (grands écarts, pirouettes et grands jetés) et d’incongru (frappement de mains précieux, castagnettes mimées et roulades sur le dos impromptues). Ce qui semble le plus le déstabiliser sont les saluts formels que leur adressent les danseurs à la fin de leur variation, avec un soupçon de défi. Espérons simplement que la jeune génération de balletomanes, habituée ces derniers temps au Balanchine aimable radoteur de son propre style (les entrées au répertoire de l’ère Millepied), ne décidera pas de jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain.

Au soir du 3 novembre, la distribution était à la fois bien assortie et tout en contrastes. L’intérêt des trois groupes solistes résidait en effet dans la différence d’atmosphère qu’ils installaient. Le premier (un garçon, deux filles) était ainsi sur le mode « fête galante » mousseuse. Mathieu Ganio s’ingénie à arrondir les angles tandis que ses deux comparses, Hannah O’Neill et Aubane Philbert, frappent délicatement des mains dans leurs duos comme si elles craignaient d’abîmer leurs bracelets de perles visibles d’elles seules.

Le second mouvement (une fille, deux garçons) joue sur la séduction et l’agacerie. Le combat (une des traduction du titre du ballet) se dessine. Dorothée Gilbert, qui semble depuis la rentrée avoir subi sa révélation balanchinienne, est très « flirt » avec ses deux compagnons plutôt bien assortis, Audric Bezard et Florian Magnenet. Leur variation en canon compétitif – pour séduire la belle ou alors le public ? – se termine par une pose finale bien dessinée. Le style tacqueté de mademoiselle Gilbert convient bien à la variation dite des « castagnettes ».

Avec le pas de deux, on entre enfin dans le vif du sujet. Myriam Ould-Braham, claire et fraîche comme l’eau de source – ce qui la rattache au premier trio –, a certes décidé de se laisser séduire par son partenaire mais pas sans mener elle-même le jeu – ce qui rappelle le second trio. Elle ralentit ses développés pour en souligner la tension. Karl Paquette, galant, lui accorde la victoire non sans quelques révérences presque humoristiques.

C’est donc un peu une histoire de la danse qui se dessine sous nos yeux. Style chrétien (Ganio-Taglioni), style païen (Gilbert-Ellsler) et la synthèse des deux styles (Ould-Braham-Grisi).

Le 4 novembre, la distribution n’a pas cette cohérence interne qui enflamme l’imagination du spectateur. Elle n’est pas cependant sans qualité. A l’inverse de Ganio, Germain Louvet décide dans le premier trio  de souligner les aspérités de la chorégraphie, mettant l’accent sur le côté Commedia del arte : accentuation des flexes, regards pleins d’humour sur les ports de bras un peu affectés, piétinements inattendus qui contrastent joliment avec les passages classiques de la chorégraphie rendus dans toute leur pureté par le danseur. On espère alors, après avoir assisté à une histoire du Ballet, assister à une métaphore autour du genre théâtral. Mais Dorothée Gilbert danse sa partie exactement de la même manière que la veille et le duo formé par Amandine Albisson et Karl Paquette nous entraine plutôt vers la mythologie. Mademoiselle Albisson n’a pas l’hyper laxité d’une Myriam Ould-Braham mais elle met des accents et les tensions là où il faut. Elle est une belle statue animée (non exempte de sensualité) et Paquette ressemble du coup à un Pygmalion qui aurait du fil à retordre avec sa créature miraculeusement dotée de vie. Pourquoi pas ?

*

 *                                   *

La création de Saburô Teshigawara bénéficie d’un beau concerto pour violon contemporain du compositeur Esa-Pekka Salonen (2009) qui dirigeait d’ailleurs les cinq premières représentations. Le dispositif scénique est d’une indéniable beauté. Un carré de feuilles d’or (le miroir du titre ?) sert de sol à neuf danseurs aux couleurs de pierres semi-précieuses. La chorégraphie semble plus élaborée que le dernier opus de ce chorégraphe pour le ballet de l’Opéra qui nous était littéralement tombé des yeux. Sur l’ostinato du premier mouvement, ce sont des courses sautées avec ports de bras en spirale qui transforment les danseurs en des sortes d’électrons bigarrés qui s’entrecroisent et infléchissent leur course. Cette constellation colorée intrigue. Un horizon d’albâtre sert ensuite de décor à la danseuse blanche, Amélie Joannidès, pour un solo gracieusement torturé au milieu des autres danseurs bougeant au ralenti. On pense qu’une histoire va naître pour faire écho à celle que semble raconter l’orchestre. Voilà justement que Joannidès amorce un duo avec la danseuse rose-fuchsia, Juliette Hilaire (dense et captivante). Et puis ? Plus rien. L’habituelle succession de solo, duos, trios se déroule inlassablement jusqu’à la fin du ballet sans toujours atteindre la barre fixée par la richesse et la force de la partition. Ganio (en bleu), Louvet (en vert) ou Cozette (en jaune, mauvaise pioche) passent presque inaperçus. Et on s’ennuie.

*

 *                                   *

On patiente pourtant dans la perspective des retrouvailles avec le Sacre de Pina Bausch, la pièce la plus brutalement puissante du programme. Las, la direction d’orchestre de Benjamin Shwartz n’est pas à la hauteur de nos attentes. Elle manque cruellement de couleur et de force. On ne ressent pas ces roulements de tonnerre ou ces bourrasques venteuses qui vous happent habituellement dans la musique. Pour cette reprise, une nouvelle génération de danseurs investit le plateau couvert d’humus. Les jeunes femmes relèvent le défi avec brio. Leur groupe est d’une grande cohésion. On note avec plaisir les petites citations que Bausch fait du chorégraphe original de la partition. Paradoxalement, c’est plutôt le Faune de Nijinsky que son Sacre qui l’inspire (deux filles entrent main dans la main en marche parallèle, un homme puis une femme se couchent sur la tunique rouge). Les garçons convainquent moins. Question de maturité sans doute. Certains jeunes corps athlétiques ne sont pas encore ceux d’hommes mais d’éphèbes. Du coup, jamais ils n’ont en groupe ce côté mégalithe contre lesquels on craint de voir les filles se briser en mille morceaux. Il n’est pas certain non plus que Florent Melac ait encore l’autorité pour être l’Élu. Comble de malchance, le 3 novembre, Eleonora Abbagnato qui nous avait jadis fortement émus en Élue, s’agite en mesure, lance des râles de porteur d’eau sans transmettre le sentiment du drame. On remarque plus les autres élues putatives restées en tunique beige. Baulac, fragile et terrorisée, Colasante, puissante et rageuse et Renavand enfin. C’est cette dernière qui enfilait la tunique rouge le soir suivant. La danseuse fait onduler sa colonne vertébrale jusqu’au tressautement. Ses grands ronds de corps avec port de bras exsudent une sorte de terreur animale. L’Élue d’Alice Renavand menace, voudrait s’échapper avant d’enfin se résigner pour rentrer dans la transe finale qu’il la conduit à l’effondrement. Une fois encore, on ressort groggy et heureux.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

4 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique