Archives de Tag: Florian Magnenet

Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

The extended apron thrust forward across where the orchestra should have been gave many seats at the Palais Garnier – already not renowned for visibility — scant sightlines unless you were in a last row and could stand up and tilt forward. Were these two “it’s a gala/not a gala” programs worth attending? Yes and/or no.

Evening  Number One: “Nureyev” on Thursday, October 8, at the Palais Garnier.

Nureyev’s re-thinkings of the relationship between male and female dancers always seek to tweak the format of the male partner up and out from glorified crane operator into that of race car driver. But that foot on the gas was always revved up by a strong narrative context.

Nutcracker pas de deux Acts One and Two

Gilbert generously offers everything to a partner and the audience, from her agile eyes through her ever-in-motion and vibrantly tensile body. A street dancer would say “the girlfriend just kills it.” Her boyfriend for this series, Paul Marque, first needs to learn how to live.

At the apex of the Act II pas of Nuts, Nureyev inserts a fiendishly complex and accelerating airborne figure that twice ends in a fish dive, of course timed to heighten a typically overboard Tchaikovsky crescendo. Try to imagine this: the stunt driver is basically trying to keep hold of the wheel of a Lamborghini with a mind of its own that suddenly goes from 0 to 100, has decided to flip while doing a U-turn, and expects to land safe and sound and camera-ready in the branches of that tree just dangling over the cliff.  This must, of course, be meticulously rehearsed even more than usual, as it can become a real hot mess with arms, legs, necks, and tutu all in getting in the way.  But it’s so worth the risk and, even when a couple messes up, this thing can give you “wow” shivers of delight and relief. After “a-one-a-two-a-three,” Marque twice parked Gilbert’s race car as if she were a vintage Trabant. Seriously: the combination became unwieldy and dull.

Marque continues to present everything so carefully and so nicely: he just hasn’t shaken off that “I was the best student in the class “ vibe. But where is the urge to rev up?  Smiling nicely just doesn’t do it, nor does merely getting a partner around from left to right. He needs to work on developing a more authoritative stage presence, or at least a less impersonal one.

 

Cendrillon

A ballerina radiating just as much oomph and chic and and warmth as Dorothée Gilbert, Alice Renavand grooved and spun wheelies just like the glowing Hollywood starlet of Nureyev’s cinematic imagination.  If Renavand “owned” the stage, it was also because she was perfectly in synch with a carefree and confident Florian Magnenet, so in the moment that he managed to make you forget those horrible gold lamé pants.

 

Swan Lake, Act 1

Gently furling his ductile fingers in order to clasp the wrists of the rare bird that continued to astonish him, Audric Bezard also (once again) demonstrated that partnering can be so much more than “just stand around and be ready to lift the ballerina into position, OK?” Here we had what a pas is supposed to be about: a dialogue so intense that it transcends metaphor.

You always feel the synergy between Bezard and Amandine Albisson. Twice she threw herself into the overhead lift that resembles a back-flip caught mid-flight. Bezard knows that this partner never “strikes a pose” but instead fills out the legato, always continuing to extend some part her movements beyond the last drop of a phrase. His choice to keep her in movement up there, her front leg dangerously tilting further and further over by miniscule degrees, transformed this lift – too often a “hoist and hold” more suited to pairs skating – into a poetic and sincere image of utter abandon and trust. The audience held its breath for the right reason.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Manfred

Bewildered, the audience nevertheless applauded wildly at the end of this agonized and out of context solo. Pretending to themselves they had understood, the audience just went with the flow of the seasoned dancer-actor. Mathias Heymann gave the moment its full dose of “ah me” angst and defied the limits of the little apron stage [these are people used to eating up space the size of a football field].

Pas de deux can mostly easily be pulled out of context and presented as is, since the theme generally gravitates from “we two are now falling in love,” and “yes, we are still in love,” to “hey, guys, welcome to our wedding!” But I have doubts about the point of plunging both actor and audience into an excerpt that lacks a shared back-story. Maybe you could ask Juliet to do the death scene a capella. Who doesn’t know the “why” of that one? But have most of us ever actually read Lord Byron, much less ever heard of this Manfred? The program notes that the hero is about to be reunited by Death [spelled with a capital “D”] with his beloved Astarté. Good to know.

Don Q

Francesco Mura somehow manages to bounce and spring from a tiny unforced plié, as if he just changed his mind about where to go. But sometimes the small preparation serves him less well. Valentine Colasante is now in a happy and confident mind-set, having learned to trust her body. She now relaxes into all the curves with unforced charm and easy wit.

R & J versus Sleeping Beauty’s Act III

In the Balcony Scene with Miriam Ould-Braham, Germain Louvet’s still boyish persona perfectly suited his Juliet’s relaxed and radiant girlishness. But then, when confronted by Léonore Baulac’s  Beauty, Louvet once again began to seem too young and coltish. It must hard make a connection with a ballerina who persists in exteriorizing, in offering up sharply-outlined girliness. You can grin hard, or you can simply smile.  Nothing is at all wrong with Baulac’s steely technique. If she could just trust herself enough to let a little bit of the air out of her tires…She drives fast but never stops to take a look at the landscape.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

As the Beatles once sang a very, very, long time ago:

 « Baby, you can drive my car
Yes, I’m gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I’ll love you »

Evening Two: “Etoiles.”  Tuesday, October 13, 2020.

We were enticed back to the Palais Garnier for a thing called “Etoiles {Stars] de l’Opera,” where the program consisted of…anything and everything in a very random way.  (Plus a bit of live music!)

Clair de lune by Alistair Marriott (2017) was announced in the program as a nice new thing. Nice live Debussy happened, because the house pianist Elena Bonnay, just like the best of dancers, makes all music fill out an otherwise empty space.

Mathieu Ganio, sporting a very pretty maxi-skort, opened his arms sculpturally, did a few perfect plies à la seconde, and proffered up a few light contractions. At the end, all I could think of was Greta Garbo’s reaction to her first kiss in the film Ninochka: “That was…restful.”  Therefore:

Trois Gnossiennes, by Hans van Manen and way back from 1982, seemed less dated by comparison.  The same plié à la seconde, a few innie contractions, a flexed foot timed to a piano chord for no reason whatever, again. Same old, eh? Oddly, though, van Manen’s pure and pensive duet suited  Ludmila Paglerio and Hugo Marchand as  prettily as Marriott’s had for Ganio. While Satie’s music breathes at the same spaced-out rhythm as Debussy’s, it remains more ticklish. Noodling around in an  absinth-colored but lucid haze, this oddball composer also knew where he was going. I thought of this restrained little pas de deux as perhaps “Balanchine’s Apollo checks out a fourth muse.”  Euterpe would be my choice. But why not Urania?

And why wasn’t a bit of Kylian included in this program? After all, Kylain has historically been vastly more represented in the Paris Opera Ballet’s repertoire than van Manen will ever be.

The last time I saw Martha Graham’s Lamentation, Miriam Kamionka — parked into a side corridor of the Palais Garnier — was really doing it deep and then doing it over and over again unto exhaustion during  yet another one of those Boris Charmatz events. Before that stunt, maybe I had seen the solo performed here by Fanny Gaida during the ‘90’s. When Sae-Un Park, utterly lacking any connection to her solar plexus, had finished demonstrating how hard it is to pull just one tissue out of a Kleenex box while pretending it matters, the audience around me couldn’t even tell when it was over and waited politely for the lights to go off  and hence applaud. This took 3.5 minutes from start to end, according to the program.

Then came the duet from William Forsythe’s Herman Schmerman, another thingy that maybe also had entered into the repertoire around 2017. Again: why this one, when so many juicy Forsythes already belong to us in Paris? At first I did not remember that this particular Forsythe invention was in fact a delicious parody of “Agon.” It took time for Hannah O’Neill to get revved up and to finally start pushing back against Vincent Chaillet. Ah, Vincent Chaillet, forceful, weightier, and much more cheerfully nasty and all-out than I’d seen him for quite a while, relaxed into every combination with wry humor and real groundedness. He kept teasing O’Neill: who is leading, eh? Eh?! Yo! Yow! Get on up, girl!

I think that for many of us, the brilliant Ida Nevasayneva of the Trocks (or another Trock! Peace be with you, gals) kinda killed being ever to watch La Mort du cygne/Dying Swan without desperately wanting to giggle at even the idea of a costume decked with feathers or that inevitable flappy arm stuff. Despite my firm desire to resist, Ludmila Pagliero’s soft, distilled, un-hysterical and deeply dignified interpretation reconciled me to this usually overcooked solo.  No gymnastic rippling arms à la Plisetskaya, no tedious Russian soul à la Ulanova.  Here we finally saw a really quietly sad, therefore gut-wrenching, Lamentation. Pagliero’s approach helped me understand just how carefully Michael Fokine had listened to our human need for the aching sound of a cello [Ophélie Gaillard, yes!] or a viola, or a harp  — a penchant that Saint-Saens had shared with Tchaikovsky. How perfectly – if done simply and wisely by just trusting the steps and the Petipa vibe, as Pagliero did – this mini-epic could offer a much less bombastic ending to Swan Lake.

Suite of Dances brought Ophélie Gaillard’s cello back up downstage for a face to face with Hugo Marchand in one of those “just you and me and the music” escapades that Jerome Robbins had imagined a long time before a “platform” meant anything less than a stage’s wooden floor.  I admit I had preferred the mysterious longing Mathias Heymann had brought to the solo back in 2018 — especially to the largo movement. Tonight, this honestly jolly interpretation, infused with a burst of “why not?” energy, pulled me into Marchand’s space and mindset. Here was a guy up there on stage daring to tease you, me, and oh yes the cellist with equally wry amusement, just as Baryshnikov once had dared.  All those little jaunty summersaults turn out to look even cuter and sillier on a tall guy. The cocky Fancy Free sailor struts in part four were tossed off in just the right way: I am and am so not your alpha male, but if you believe anything I’m sayin’, we’re good to go.

The evening wound down with a homeopathic dose of Romantic frou-frou, as we were forced to watch one of those “We are so in love. Yes, we are still in love” out of context pas de deux, This one was extracted from John Neumeier’s La Dame aux Camélias.

An ardent Mathieu Ganio found himself facing a Laura Hecquet devoted to smoothing down her fluffy costume and stiff hair. When Neumeier’s pas was going all horizontal and swoony, Ganio gamely kept replacing her gently onto her pointes as if she deserved valet parking.  But unlike, say, Anna Karina leaning dangerously out of her car to kiss Belmondo full throttle in Pierrot le Fou, Hecquet simply refused to hoist herself even one millimeter out of her seat for the really big lifts. She was dead weight, and I wanted to scream. Unlike almost any dancer I have ever seen, Hecquet still persists in not helping her co-driver. She insists on being hoisted and hauled around like a barrel. Partnering should never be about driving the wrong way down a one-way street.

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Ballet de l’Opéra : retrouvailles sur le pont

 

Milieu de soirée, sur le parvis de l’Opéra

(soirée du 8 octobre).

Cléopold : James, votre nœud est de travers ce soir, auriez-vous perdu l’habitude des soirées de théâtre ?

James (haussant les épaules) : vous ne comprendrez décidément jamais rien à la subtile élégance de la dissymétrie…

Cléopold : C’est vrai, je reste très… Grand siècle… Mais à propos « d’arrangements », comment avez-vous trouvé le dispositif imaginé par la grande boutique pour ces soirées de retrouvailles ?

James (un peu désabusé) : L’avant-scène, plutôt étroite même si elle mange les cinq premiers rangs d’orchestre, oblige à danser petit. La proximité avec la salle met en lumière le moindre détail, et les interprètes ont visiblement chaud, parfois même avant l’entrée en piste. Cette soirée Noureev semblait peuplée de revenants : nous, tels des spectres masqués arpentant un Opéra-Garnier vide d’animation, eux, étoiles et premiers danseurs qu’on n’avait pas revus depuis – au moins – l’hiver dernier.

Cléopold : Quel pessimisme ! Le programme aurait-il échoué à restaurer votre inoxydable bonne humeur ?

James : Une soirée de pas de deux, en guise de retrouvailles faute de mieux ? La perspective n’était pas franchement engageante. Mais peut-être a-t-on a assisté à un peu plus.

Cléopold : Que voulez-vous dire ?

James : Sans qu’on sache toujours démêler la part de l’interprétation et celle de l’imagination, on s’aperçoit être capable d’enrichir la vision de l’extrait proposé – parfois chiche – de tout ce qui l’entoure habituellement : l’histoire des personnages, le décor, le corps de ballet. Dorothée Gilbert campe Clara d’un regard ; Valentine Colasante, qu’on découvre à son mariage, laisse deviner par son abattage la Kitri volontaire qu’elle a été deux actes auparavant ; la Cendrillon d’Alice Renavand, tout en charmants épaulements, est une star en devenir ; Myriam Ould-Braham, frémissante Juliette au balcon, galvanise le Roméo de Germain Louvet, qui semble – enfin – aimer quelqu’un d’autre que lui-même.

Cléopold : C’est vrai. Il y avait dans cette soirée quelque chose de bien plus satisfaisant que la soirée «Hommage à Noureev», de sinistre mémoire. Néanmoins, excusez-moi de pinailler, mais ce programme était quand même largement perfectible ; à commencer par la distribution…

Car vraiment… six étoiles féminines pour deux étoiles masculines –dont l’une est mi-cuite – et le reste de premiers danseurs – pour certains forts verts -, cela pouvait parfois donner une soirée un brin maman-fiston.

James (interloqué) : Comment ? Insinueriez-vous, Cléopold que nos étoiles féminines ont l’air trop mûres ? Ne dites pas cela en public. Vous allez vous faire lyncher !

Cléopold (levant les yeux au ciel) : Pas du tout. Dorothée Gilbert et Myriam Ould-Braham sont des miracles de juvénilité… Mais il y avait un décalage de maturité artistique entre elles et leur partenaire. Ces deux danseuses connaissent leur petit Noureev du bout des doigts à la pointe du pied. (S’exaltant) Ah, la délicatesse des frottés de la pointe au sol, les relâchés du bas de jambe, la souplesse des bras d’Ould-Braham dès son entrée dans Roméo et Juliette ! Mais leurs partenaires manquent soit de maîtrise – Paul Marque avec Gilbert à force d’additionner les poses correctes dans ses deux passages successifs de l’acte 1 et de l’acte 2, reste dans le saccadé – soit d’épaisseur.

James : Vraiment, Louvet ?

Cléopold : Oui, James. Je conviens du fait que Germain Louvet gagnerait à travailler plus souvent avec des danseuses chevronnées comme Ould-Braham, Gilbert ou Pagliero. Mais le rapport restait un tantinet inégal. Cela passait parce que cela correspond à la vision de Noureev pour Juliette. Mais je ne suis pas sûr que c’était vraiment le résultat d’un travail d’interprétation de la part du danseur.

On retrouvait également ce déséquilibre dans le très applaudi pas de deux de Don Quichotte. Aux côtés de Valentine Colasante – pourtant la plus récemment nommée – , Francesco Mura, jeune danseur qui en a « sous le pied », veut trop danser à fond. Il laisse ainsi deviner les limites de son élévation. Et, par surcroit, ses bras sont perfectibles.

James : C’est vrai. Ainsi, vous n’avez pas goûté cette soirée autant que moi, Cléopold. (Souriant), je croyais que j’étais le pessimiste de la soirée.

Cléopold : Non, je vous rejoins sur l’idée que certains danseurs ou danseuses faisaient déborder leur interprétation au-delà de la limite de leur pas de deux.

James : Il y eut même des moments où l’ensemble du couple a accompli ce tour de force…

Cléopold : Et, à chaque fois, des couples « mixtes » étoile-premier danseur. Vous avez déjà évoqué Cendrillon. Alice Renavand, la fluidité volubile de ses épaulements, le plané de ses attitudes et de ses pirouettes, était parfaitement servie par Florian Magnenet. Lui aussi campait un acteur-vedette d’une grande juvénilité. Mais c’était celle d’un interprète mûr ; la plus belle à mon sens.

James : Exactement !

Cléopold : Et puis … Le Lac !

James : Dans l’adage du cygne blanc, Audric Bezard et Amandine Albisson composaient le couple le plus équilibré de la soirée. Ils tissaient tous deux une histoire d’apprivoisement mutuel.

Cléopold : Oui !  Bezard tient parfois son cygne d’exception – la ligne et le moelleux d’Albisson ! – comme un Ivan Tzarévitch qui vient de capturer son Oiseau de feu. Avez-vous remarqué combien ce pas, habituellement ennuyeux quand il est privé de l’écrin du corps de ballet, était ici plein de drame ? Il y avait même une dispute et une réconciliation : quand Odette repousse le prince pour la 2e fois, celui-ci fait mine de partir. La danseuse tend un bras en arrière et le prince entend l’appel…

James (s’enflammant) : Il a la présence et l’assurance, elle a les bras déliés, des mains très étudiées, un cou ductile, et tout respire la narration.

(avec une petite moue) À l’inverse, l’exécution par Léonore Baulac et Germain Louvet du pas de deux de l’acte III de La Belle au bois dormant a tous les défauts de la prestation de gala – c’est empesé, tout corseté – sans en avoir ni la propreté ni la virtuosité.

Cléopold : Oui, c’est dommage d’avoir terminé ce gala sur une notre mineure… D’autant que… On en parle du solo de Manfred qui précédait ce final?

James : Le poétique solo, dansé par Mathias Heymann, produit un effet moins intense que lors de la piteuse soirée de gala d’hommage de 2013. La musique enregistrée et la petitesse de la scène n’encouragent pas la fougue. Et puis, le contraste avec le reste‌ est moins accusé.

Cléopold : C’est juste, le danseur semblait bridé par l’espace et par la musique enregistrée. L’aspect dramatique du solo était un peu « anti-climatique » dans la soirée.

Ce qui nous amène à ma deuxième objection à ce programme. Mathias Heymann était au moins dans le vrai lorsqu’il présentait un solo. Rend-t-on vraiment hommage à Noureev si on oublie les nombreuses variations qu’il a réglé, souvent sur lui, pour faire avancer la danse masculine ? A part Manfred, la seule qui soit notablement de lui dans cette soirée, était peut-être la moins heureuse : celle de Basilio dans Don Quichotte avec sa redoutable et peu payante série de tours en l’air finis en arabesque. Où étaient les solos réflexifs de Siegfried dans le Lac ou de Désirée dans la Belle ?

James : Et ceux d’Abderam…

Cléopold : Et pourquoi cantonner la plupart des premiers danseurs dans des rôles de partenaires d’adage ? J’aurais volontiers vu Bézard dans la variation de la fin de l’acte 1 avant d’initier son pas de deux avec Albisson ;  et pourquoi pas Magnenet dans celle de l’acteur vedette de Cendrillon…

James (réajustant finalement son nœud) : Certes, certes… Le deuxième programme de pas de deux, où nous verrons les grands absents de la soirée, sera peut-être mieux conçu.

Cléopold (tripotant sa vieille montre à gousset d’un air distrait) : Sans doute, sans doute. Affaire à suivre ?

 

[Quelques gouttes de pluie commencent à tomber sur le parvis du théâtre. Les deux compères se pressent vers leur bouche de métro respective]

 

[A suivre]

 

6 Commentaires

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Mats Ek à Garnier : expériences contrastées

Les Balletotos sont chacun leur tour allés découvrir le programme Mats Ek (les 22, 25 juin et 2 juillet). Les hasards des distributions ont fait qu’ils ont vu trois fois la même Carmen. Seule Fenella a vu la deuxième pièce avec une autre danseuse que l’envahissante directrice de la danse. Elle choisit de ne parler que de cette expérience. Sa contribution est, en partie, traduite. Bonne lecture!

*

 *                                                   *

JAMES

La rédaction-en-chef m’a commis d’office à la relation de la soirée Mats Ek, au motif que j’avais vu Sylvie Guillem dans Carmen il y a plus de 25 ans. L’ennui est qu’à part l’image de la star fumant le cigare à califourchon sur une grosse boule noire, je ne me souvenais pas de grand-chose. Qui plus est, il s’agissait de l’affiche du spectacle, et comme pour les photos d’enfance, on ne sait plus trop si on se souvient de l’événement ou de sa captation.

Toutefois, comme s’il suffisait de tirer le fil, des souvenirs qu’on aurait cru à jamais engloutis refont surface au fil de la représentation : le mouvement sinueux des bras et des mains du personnage de M. (alias Micaëla, rôle dansé, au soir de la première, par la toujours spirituelle Muriel Zusperreguy), la narration en boucle (la pièce démarre et se conclut par l’exécution de José), le second degré assumé dans la représentation d’une Espagne de pacotille. Les costumes scintillants qu’aucun Andalou ne porterait, le baragouin édenté hurlé par le Gipsy d’Adrien Couvez, le décor en forme d’éventail :  tout respire le presque-faux ou l’à-peine-juste, c’est comme on veut.

Comme Roland Petit, Mats Ek fait un puzzle de la partition de Bizet, et la recompose à sa guise ; parfois il en triture les lignes, pour faire surgir, d’un saut pris très staccato, un rythme inattendu. Inventivité et lisibilité immédiate, envolées contrecarrées d’un clin d’œil trivial, typification d’un trait des personnages, mouvement allongé qui se dégoupille en flexe : tout l’aimable savoir-faire du chorégraphe suédois éclate dans cette Carmen, de manière plus convaincante que pour d’autres œuvres narratives. Amandine Albisson prend le rôle-titre à bras-le-corps, joue bravache, froufroute sa traîne et meurt avec panache. Florian Magnenet peint un José fragile et torturé. Et puis il y a Hugo Marchand en Escamillo, qui après une entrée en scène explosive, fait tout à la fois montre de bravoure, d’histrionisme et d’humour, électrisant la scène (oui, « je suis fans, au pluriel », comme dit Agrado dans Todo sobre mi madre).

Après l’entracte, place à deux pièces par lesquelles Mats Ek renoue avec la création, qu’il avait annoncé quitter en janvier 2016. Another place, réglé sur la Sonate en si mineur de Liszt, nous transporte dans la veine intimiste du chorégraphe. On ne sait pas trop quelle histoire raconte le duo entre Stéphane Bullion et Aurélie Dupont, mais – le piano entêtant et diabolique de Staffan Scheja aidant – on suit sans barguigner, ni relâcher son attention, leur intrigant manège. L’art du chorégraphe est de ménager le suspense, et de pousser constamment à se demander ce qu’il va inventer. Si les places n’étaient si chères, on retournerait volontiers voir ce que Ludmila Pagliero et Alessio Carbone, interprètes dont on peut attendre bien plus d’expressivité, confèrent au pas de deux.

On est plus réservé sur le Boléro, qui présenté en fondu-enchaîné avec la pièce précédente, ne donne pas à voir l’idée poussée au paroxysme que suggère la musique. Il y a du métier, mais pas de tension qui monte.  À l’issue du crescendo, le monsieur à chapeau mou qui a rempli sa baignoire d’eau pendant quelque 15 minutes s’y plonge tout habillé. Plouf !

*

 *                                                   *

CLEOPOLD

Le programme Mats Ek était sans doute l’un des plus prometteurs de la morne saison du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. Pensez ! Deux créations par un grand maître qui, de surcroit, avait fait il y a deux ans sa tournée d’adieu avec sa femme, danseuse fétiche et muse, Ana Laguna. Dans le courant de la saison, on a appris que la sauce allait être rallongée par l’entrée au répertoire d’un des chefs d’œuvre du chorégraphe, sa Carmen datant de 1992. Alors qu’en-a-t-il été ?

Pour Carmen, qui ouvrait la soirée, Mats Ek a décidé d’utiliser la partition du compositeur russe Chtchedrine pour un ballet créé par Maïa Plissetskaïa (son épouse) en 1969. Le ballet original du chorégraphe cubain Alberto Alonso était une version délayée à la sauce soviétique de la Carmen de Roland Petit (des chaises, des masques, une arène, un zeste de sexe). Dans la partition de Chtchedrine, les thèmes de Bizet sont réorchestrés de manière parfois efficace mais le plus souvent outrancière. La partition laisse de la place pour la peinture de personnages escamotés dans la version plus condensée de Petit.

Mats Ek, dans sa version, donne ainsi une importance certaine au Capitaine (Aurélien Houette, marmoréen) qui rabaisse Don José et reluque l’héroïne, au Gitan, compagnon de Carmen qui braille en yaourt vaguement et drolatiquement ibérique (Adrien Couvez, qui sait ménager un moment d’authentique émotion lorsqu’il pleure la mort de l’anti-héroïne) mais surtout à M(ickaela) sorte de lien entre les différentes parties de l’histoire comptée en boucle (elle débute et s’achève par le peloton d’exécution de Don José). La gestuelle si particulière de Mats Ek se déploie dans ce rôle (Muriel Zussperreguy y est impressionnante de justesse) : avancées à petits pas glissés, suggérant la bigote, oscillation de la colonne vertébrale, bras de Piéta se refermant sur le dos de Don José. Pour le rôle titre, on retrouve d’autres aspects de l’esthétique du chorégraphe suédois. Carmen qui fume le gros cigare, exécute des sauts en attitudes déformées de la hanche et se retrouve souvent assise en position d’obstétrique.

Dans cette esthétique familière, la distribution soliste semble encore en devenir. Amandine Albisson, presque trop belle, donne un fini un peu extérieur à sa Carmen. Son caractère plutôt réservé, qui est l’apanage des ballerines, créé ici trop de distance pour ce rôle de femme capiteuse et trompe la mort. Hugo Marchand, en toréador, nous a paru également un peu dans le fini extérieur. Ses beaux sauts (il se retrouve à l’écart parfait sans qu’on devine d’où vient l’impulsion) impressionnent mais il lui manque la pointe de sex appeal qu’on attend d’Escamillo. C’est ainsi qu’en dépit du Don José benêt à souhait de Florian Magnenet, du corps de ballet énergique de soldats à bérets lançant frénétiquement des banderilles à foulard et de cigarière aux robes irisées comme des boules de Noël (Eve Grinsztajn très émouvante dans son lamento sur le corps de son capitaine de mari), on s’ennuie un peu à partir de la seconde idylle entre Carmen et son militaire dévoyé.

Après l’entrée au répertoire, venait la partie la plus ambitieuse du programme, les deux créations de l’ex-retraité de la chorégraphie mondiale. Another Place, sur la sonate en si mineur de Franz Liszt, est plutôt bien nommée en ce qu’il s’en dégage un sentiment de transposition dans un nouveau lieu (le plateau de l’Opéra et non plus comme souvent ces dernières années sur celui du TCE) d’une formule éprouvée. Sur scène, un couple, une table et un tapis rouge. On a vu et apprécié cette formule dans les incarnations qu’en ont donné, Mats Ek et Ana Laguna ou encore Ana Laguna et Mikhaïl Barychnikov. Sylvie Guillem a également beaucoup dansé dans ce genre de variations autour d’un quotidien sublimé par le bas, c’est à dire par l’entrejambe (dans Another Place, l’homme se retrouve à un moment la figure dans la raie des fesses de sa partenaire). Seulement voilà, si Stéphane Bullion, l’homme, essuie ses lunettes d’une manière touchante et maîtrise parfaitement les sauts « Ekiens » en se désarticulant en l’air, sa partenaire, Aurélie Dupont, nous laisse, encore une fois, sur le bord du chemin : le développé 4e devant sur jambe de terre pliée avec le buste couché sur la jambe en l’air, typique d’Ek et qui nous émeut presque immanquablement était ici tellement court de ligne qu’il en était dénué de signification. J’ai passé mon temps à essayer de transposer la chorégraphie sur le corps d’une autre danseuse, ainsi durant ce porté en arabesque très classique qui se rabougrit en l’air. Je saisis l’intention du chorégraphe, mais j’ai le sentiment de devoir finir sa phrase. Il n’y a décidément [PAS] de deux possible avec Aurélie Dupont. On plaint ce pauvre hère de Bullion dans sa solitude accompagnée de toute une vie (est-ce pour cela qu’il ne pianote sur la table, mimant le travail du pianiste, qu’au début de la pièce?).

Et ce pensum dure 33 longues minutes. Nous n’avons rien contre les redites chorégraphiques, mais il faut les donner à une interprète qui a quelque chose à dire.

Le Boléro, servi sans baisser de rideau après Another Place, à l’avantage de sortir un peu de l’attendu. Un vieillard habillé de blanc et coiffé d’un chapeau à large bords (Niklas Ek) remplit imperturbablement une baignoire de zinc avec son sceau d’eau, incarnant par là même l’ostinato de la partition de Ravel, tandis que de gros macaronis de nage tortillés (vaguement en forme de profil humain) descendent des cintres et dessinent, par le biais des éclairages, des motifs surréalistes au sol. La vingtaine de danseurs habillés de costumes noirs à capuche apparaît par groupes variés (la compagnie entière, en duos ou par doubles quintettes) et égrène le vocabulaire technique du chorégraphe sans l’appareil psychanalytique qui l’accompagne habituellement. A la fin, certains danseurs accomplissent de micro-agressions sur la personne du petit baigneur qui continue de remplir, imperturbable, sa cuve de Zinc. Pour le Final, l’ensemble de la compagnie gît au sol. Le vieil homme se plonge alors à la renverse dans son bain.

Et alors?? L’absence de message est-elle le message que veut nous transmettre Mats Ek dans sa réaction à une partition dont son compositeur disait que ce n’était pas de la musique ? Où doit-on penser que le chorégraphe révéré est revenu de sa retraite pour nous annoncer qu’il n’avait plus rien à dire?

 

 

*

 *                                                   *

FENELLA

I saw exactly the same casts on July 2nd.  With one exception. And this “another woman” turned out to make all the difference: Ludmila Pagliero partnered Stéphane Bullion in Another Place rather than Aurélie Dupont. If James let loose not a single word about this pair in his piece, and if Cléopold merely found he pitied a touching and valiant Bullion, then there must have been a problem. The problem is called Aurélie Dupont. But I am not surprised. Many years ago, after witnessing Dupont’s stage presence in Sleeping Beauty, an American friend turned to me and hissed ,“This princess doesn’t need a prince. She’s so self-involved she can just kiss herself.” Why on earth did she think we needed her to hog the stage again, not just once but twice this season?

So, for once as far as which one of us gets what performance, I got the luck of the draw.

When Pagliero entered from downstage and began towards Bullion, her body, her back, her neck, all radiated the rapt and alert almost-stillness of a vibrantly curious bird-watcher or eager young detective. Something mysterious was already happening. Throughout this “solo for two” [as Ek calls them] these two never stopped questioning themselves as much as they questioned each other and made us root for them to find some kind of absolution. Their tender, yieldingly gentle and querying gazes remained locked throughout and the ways this made their bodies work in response were clearly visible up to the top of the house.

Lorsque Pagliero entra à l’avant-scène en direction de Bullion, son corps, son dos, son cou, tout irradiait la concentration et l’alerte immobilité du vibrant et curieux ornithologue ou du zélé jeune détective. […] Tout au long de ce « solo pour deux » [tel que l’appelle Mats Ek] ces deux-là n’ont jamais cessé de se questionner eux-mêmes autant qu’ils questionnaient l’autre et nous ont fait souhaiter qu’ils trouveraient une forme d’absolution. […]

The duet felt improvised, each phase and phrase of movement seemingly just then inspired by a look, a touch, or a sudden thought. Even when my mind knew that a combination was being repeated, my core knew otherwise. When she launched herself at the hilly outline of his body — for the moment having been reduced to a distorted blob entirely covered by a square of red carpet — her urgency perfectly illustrated how movement is metaphor: “Please let me into your head. Please? Yes, please!” They weren’t “Bullion and Pagliero.” They were “He and She.” Any couple’s lifetime together can turn out to be a magnificent sonata.

Le duo semblait improvisé, chaque phase, chaque phrase du mouvement apparemment inspirée par un regard, un contact ou une soudaine pensée. […]

Lorsqu’elle se lança sur les contours vallonnés [du] corps [de son partenaire] –alors réduit à une masse floue entièrement couverte par un carré de moquette rouge- son « urgence » illustrait parfaitement combien le mouvement est métaphore : « S’il te plait, laisse-moi entrer dans tes pensées ! Allez ! S’il te plait ! ». Ils n’étaient plus « Bullion et Pagliero ». Ils étaient « Lui et Elle ».

Toute longue vie de couple peut se changer en une magnifique sonate.

Commentaires fermés sur Mats Ek à Garnier : expériences contrastées

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

León-Lightfoot / van Manen : vues croisées sur le vide

Les Balletotos ont tardé à publier sur le programme León-Lightfoot / van Manen car ils attendaient de l’avoir tous vu afin de vous faire connaître leur sentiment.

C’est Cléopold qui a ouvert le bal, lors de la première publique, le 18 avril dernier. Verdict? « C’était court, mais c’était long ».

C’est une expérience bien curieuse que cette soirée León, Lightfoot, van Manen : trois noms mais en réalité deux « chorégraphes » (Sol León et Paul Lightfoot sont un tandem) ; trois noms attachés au Nederlands Dans Theater, mais absence d’une œuvre de son chorégraphe de référence, Jiri Kylian, récemment devenu académicien chez nous. Enfin, c’est une toute petite heure de danse qui dégage un lancinant, un interminable ennui.

Les deux épaisses tranches de pain post-classique du  duo León-Lightfoot enserraient une maigre tranche de ballet néoclassique (huit petites minutes !) par Hans Van Manen, une personnalité de la danse très respectée en Europe du Nord. Le chorégraphe a fait une partie de sa carrière au NDT, précédant Kylian à la direction, avant de revenir, en fin de mandat de ce dernier, en tant que chorégraphe en résidence. Trois Gnossiennes, présenté déjà pour le gala d’ouverture de l’opéra de Paris en 2017, est pourtant une addition dispensable au répertoire-maison. La chorégraphie, néoclassique dans une veine post-balanchinienne, aspire à la modernité par l’usage des pieds flexes par la ballerine. Pendant une large portion de la troisième gnossienne, le danseur maintient le pied de sa partenaire dans cette position disgracieuse sans pour autant perturber l’harmonie fluide et convenue du partenariat. Pour le reste, la danseuse descend en grand écart soutenue par son partenaire (une option déjà utilisée par Balanchine pour Apollon Musagète en 1928). Les bustes sont tenus très droits, sans doute pour suggérer le côté hiératique des pièces de Satie. Les répétitions quasi mécaniques des thèmes du musicien correspondent à des répétitions à l’identique des combinaisons chorégraphiques -ainsi un grand plié à la seconde vu plusieurs fois alternativement de face puis de dos. Ludmila Pagliero et Hugo Marchand sont assurément très beaux à regarder et leur partenariat est somptueusement réglé. Mais il ne se dégage aucune intimité de leurs passes (…partout).

Paul Lightfoot et Sol León ont fait partie de la génération de danseurs des années 1990-2000 au Nederlands Dans Theater, un moment où la muse de Jiri Kylian avait pris une humeur plus sombre et versait un tantinet dans la préciosité. Les scénographies du maître, très élaborées (et s’inspirant d’une manière très personnelle des dispositifs utilisés par Forsythe pour ses propres ballets), très noires, renvoyaient à une vision à la fois sarcastique et désespérée du monde actuel. Le ballet de l’Opéra a fait entrer quelques opus à son répertoire (le dernier en date étant Tar and Feathers). Sleight Of Hand et Speak For Yourself correspondent très exactement à cette veine. Dans Sleight Of Hand (Tour de passe-passe en traduction), deux poupées de carnaval au buste perché à 5 mètre du sol, dans des costumes édouardiens que ne renierait pas Tim Burton (Hannah O’Neill, qui fera également une petite apparition seins nus – une référence bien gratuite à Bella Figura de Kylian ?- et Stéphane Bullion) font par moment des mouvements aussi emphatiques que sémaphoriques. Ils surplombent un danseur en blanc (Mickaël Lafont), un couple (Leonore Baulac et Germain Louvet) et un trio de garçons (Chung Wing Lam, Adrien Couvez et Pablo Legasa), qui se succèdent d’une manière linéaire absolument étrangère aux flux et reflux de la musique de Philip Glass. L’élément de vocabulaire chorégraphique le plus marquant – mais ce n’est que par sa récurrence – est un grand développé à la seconde soutenu de la main comme lors d’un pied dans la main. Ce tic est parfois décliné en une attitude croisée. Le thème du ballet est absolument illisible sans l’aide du programme. Les pas de deux entre Baulac et Louvet ne mènent nulle part. Seul Legasa parvient à rendre la gestuelle intéressante car il la rattache à des mouvements quotidiens qui seraient hypertrophiés.

Pour Speak For Yourself, une pièce de 1999, la scénographie est tout aussi élaborée. Elle s’ouvre par une variation enfumée exécutée par François Alu (à qui les pieds dans la main conviennent moins qu’à un Legasa). le danseur est rejoint sur scène par cinq de ses collègues qui évoluent dans un carré de lumière violemment blanche comparée à la sienne, plus tamisée, puis par trois danseuses. Là encore, on se lasse assez vite des moult ports de bras emphatiques et  des partenariats enchevêtrés qui ne créent jamais vraiment de lien entre les danseurs.

La fumée fait bientôt place à une pluie qui tombe des cintres. Les glissés sur l’eau font tout d’abord leur petit effet mais, à l’usage, ne construisent aucune tension. En dépit des perfections formelles du couple principal, encore Ludmila Pagliero et Hugo Marchand, de l’intensité plus sauvage de Valentine Colasante, et de l’excellence générale de la distribution, on n’attend qu’une chose, que Legasa se mette à bouger, mystérieux et singulier.

A la fin de la soirée, on se demande, attristé, ce qui nous a tant hérissé dans cette addition de perfections. Sol León et Paul Lightfoot connaissent pourtant leur travail et leur chorégraphie est ciselée. Mais il manque à ces faiseurs compétents le génie du théâtre : leur gestion des groupes est prévisible et le rapport que leurs chorégraphies entretiennent avec les scénographies élaborées qu’ils choisissent est trop ténu. Leurs ballets ne laissent pas au spectateur, comme ceux de Kylián, la possibilité de se créer sa propre histoire.

En attendant, Johan Inger, danseur et chorégraphe de la même génération du NDT que le duo León-Lighfoot, qui possède pleinement toutes ces qualités, n’a toujours pas fait son entrée au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris. Mais il y a longtemps qu’on a cessé d’espérer que la direction de l’Opéra fasse preuve d’un minimum de flair…

*

 *                                             *

James, qui avait perfidement refilé son ticket de première à Cléopold pour courir un lièvre plus appétissant (et juste ce qu’il faut éloigné de la Danse pour se permettre de n’en pas rendre compte) a vu la même distribution le  27 avril.

Que retenir de la soirée León & Lighfoot / van Manen, une fois leurs 53 minutes envolées ?  Sleight of Hand est un mystère de composition manquée : la dimension plastique est manifestement léchée, mais les différents ingrédients sont comme étrangers l’un à l’autre. Il ne faut pas s’attendre ici – comme dans les chorégraphies de Kylián, modèle évident de León et Lighfoot – à une correspondance sensuelle entre le mouvement dansé et le grain des instruments de musique. Ni même à une profonde compréhension rythmique de Glass, comme chez Keersmaeker. Non, ici la musique a juste une fonction décorative. Ne restent donc en mémoire que quelques détails superficiels : le sens de la grimace d’Adrien Couvez, la présence de Mickaël Laffont, le magnétisme de Pablo Legasa, la peur de voir Hannah O’Neill et Stéphane Bullion tomber de leur chaise d’arbitre de tennis.

Les Trois gnossiennes de Hans van Manen passent gentiment, dans une version très beauté des lignes. On est un peu loin de l’étrangeté expérimentale que peuvent donner à l’œuvre des danseurs du NDT (Caroline Iura et Lindsay Fischer en 1986), mais on sait gré à Hugo Marchand et Ludmila Pagliero d’éviter les afféteries d’une interprétation à la russe. 

Après l’entracte, Speak for Yourself emploie le même fond de sauce que la pièce d’ouverture, et suscite le même souvenir évanescent. Sauf que cette fois, on a peur que les danseurs se tordent la cheville sur le sol glissant.

*

 *                                             *

Fenella écopa, du coup, du ticket de Cléopold au prétexte qu’elle serait la seule à voir la seconde distribution. Depuis le 14 mai, les deux rédacteurs de la gent masculine rasent les murs…

The entire evening consisted of exactly fifty-three minutes of performance enlivened by a twenty-minute intermission. Marketed as if we were buying tickets to a real evening of dance.  Seriously?

But even by the time the lights came on for intermission, the audience was politely dead.  I looked around me and began with an “eh bien?” that was greeted by startled stares. Then I made a face and raised my eyebrows. The woman standing behind me sighed and said, “I am so glad you dared to say that.”

And this at only twenty-eight minutes into the fifty-three. Long minutes of fluid, lilting, hip-swaying squats in second position. Flexed feet. Grab a foot in your hand. A shoulder gets raised or hunched and then feet glide as if the stage were wet (León & Lightfoot’s Sleight of Hand) and then glide the same way when the stage really is wet (León & Lightfoot’s Speak For Yourself). Neither title explains the difference between the two pieces.

During eight minutes of the fifty-three, Les Trois Gnossiennes, a 1982 Hans van Manen very on-the-beat duet set to Satie’s tender little piano reverie, gave us mostly supported splat splits that can be dated back to Balanchine’s 1928 Apollo: a woman splats down to the ground in a split while a man heaves her to and fro via his hands stuck under her armpits.

While inserting a pas de deux into any program can certainly enliven an evening by bringing the focus back onto individual talents and away from groovy lighting effects, van Manen’s duet came off as more of a supported solo. When partnered, Léonore Baulac greedily seeks her counterpart’s eyes, as if desperate for absolution or argument. Or both.  The way she launches herself into every combination remains as full-bodied as when she and François Alu had pushed and pulled against each others’ flesh and minds in Forsythe’s Blake Works.  Her partner here, Florian Magnenet, just didn’t (couldn’t? wouldn’t?) respond in kind. He was disengaged to the point that he reminded me of what male ballet partners used to be called in the 19th century: porteurs (porters, i.e. baggage lifters). He seemed to be present merely to get Baulac up out of her deadly-serious split-splats.

Aussi intéressant que puisse être un pas de deux pour ramener l’attention sur des individualités après une orgie d’effets de lumière atmosphérique, le duo de van Manen est plutôt ressorti comme un solo à porteur. Lorsqu’elle a un partenaire, Léonore Baulac recherche avidement les yeux de son comparse, comme si elle était désespérément en quête d’une confrontation ou d’une absolution. Voire les deux […] Mais ici, son partenaire d’occasion, Florian Magnenet, ne (pouvait? voulait?) répondre à l’unisson. Il était comme désengagé, au point que je me suis souvenu du terme employé au XIXe pour désigner les danseurs : porteurs (c’est à dire caristes à bagages). […]

Alu did pop up in the next ballet, where he served as a smoke machine (don’t ask) once his short solo was over. What a waste.

Alu a fait une apparition dans le ballet suivant, en tant que machine à enfumage (sans commentaire…) une fois son court solo terminé. Quel gâchis.

If you are going to program an evening of classic Dutch ballets then please at least include a Kylian, or van Manen’s masterpiece Adagio Hammerklavier [three couples instead of one, thirty minutes instead of eight]. That would have made for a real “triple-bill.”

A young artist who had scored a seat in another part of the house began musing about the whole thing. “Yoga-hold poses? Really? And that repeated high attitude á la seconde that you hold out and onto with your hand? That’s what you think is so cool when you are a nineteen-year-old dance student.  The smoke and the waterfall?  Yeah, like the fountain display at Disneyworld. But this is what really bothered me: all night long, the dancers were moving, but they were never transformed by the movement, not ever.”

My young friend then turned down an invitation to at least take the metro together. “We could talk a bit more,” I insisted. “No,” he said, “I need to walk this one off.”

 

Commentaires fermés sur León-Lightfoot / van Manen : vues croisées sur le vide

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Swan Lake in Paris: a chalice half empty or half full?

Le Lac des Cygnes, February 26, 2019, Paris Opera Ballet.

[Nb : des passages de l’article sont traduits en français]

Swan Lake confronts the dancers and audience with musical leitmotifs, archetypes, story elements (down to the prince’s name), and dramatic conundrums that all seem to have been lifted willy-nilly from Richard Wagner.

Today, for those who worship ballet, including dancers, a perfect performance of Swan Lake ranks right up there with the Holy Grail. Yet the first full-length performances in the West only happened only a little over a half-century ago. Each version you see picks and choses from a plethora of conflicting Russian memories. The multiple adaptations of this fairy tale so Manicheaen that it’s downright biblical – good vs. evil, white vs. black, angelic vs. satanic – most often defy us to believe in it. The basic story kind of remains the same but “God is in the details,” as Mies van der Rohe once pronounced. The details and overall look of some or other productions, just as the projection and nuance of some or other dancers, either works for you or does not despite the inebriating seductiveness of Tchaikovsky’s thundering score.

Siegfried

Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth. Proverbs 27:1

Just as the Templars and others obsessed with the Grail did, many ballet dancers can   succumb to wounds. The re-re-re-castings for this series due to injuries have engendered a kind of “hesitation waltz” on stage.

As he settled in to his mini-throne downstage right on February 26th, Florian Magnenet (originally only an understudy) was clearly exhausted already, probably due to doing double-duty in a punishingly hyperkinetic modern ballet across town on other nights. Once it was clear he had to do this ballet, why hadn’t the director released him and used an understudy for the Goeke? While the company prides itself on versatility, it is also big enough that another could have taken over that chore.

Perhaps Magnenet was using his eyes and face to dramatize the prince, looking soulful or something (the stuff that comped critics can see easily from their seats). But raised eyebrows do not read into outer space. From the cheap seats you only see if the body acts through how it phrases the movement, through the way an extension is carried down to the finish, through the way a spine arches. Nothing happened, Magnenet’s body didn’t yearn. I saw a nice young man, not particularly aching with questions, tiredly polite throughout Act I. While at first I had hoped he was under-dancing on purpose for some narrative reason, the Nureyev adagio variation confirmed that the music was indeed more melancholy than this prince. Was one foot aching instead?

« Florian Magnenet […] était clairement déjà épuisé par son double-emploi dans une purge moderne et inutilement hyperkinétique exécutée de l’autre côté de la ville les autres soirs.

Peut-être Magnenet utilisait-il ses yeux ou son visage pour rendre son prince dramatique, éloquent ou quelque chose du genre […]. Mais un froncement de sourcils ne se lit pas sur longue distance. […] Rien ne se passait ; le corps de Magnenet n’aspirait à rien. J’ai vu un gentil garçon, qui ne souffrait pas particulièrement de questionnement existentiel […]. Souffrait-il plutôt d’un pied ? »

Odette

Who can find a virtuous woman? For her price is far above rubies. Proverbs 31:10

And…Odile

The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in kings’ palaces. Proverbs 30:28

While for some viewers, the three hours of Swan Lake boil down to the thirty seconds of Odile’s 32 fouetté turns, for me the alchemy of partnering matters more than anything else. As it should. This is a love story, not a circus act.

Due to the casting shuffles, our Elsa/Odette and Kundry/Odile seemed as surprised as the Siegfried to have landed up on the same stage. While this potentially could create mutual fireworks, alas, the end result was indeed as if each one of the pair was singing in a different opera.

For all of Act II on February 26th, Amandine Albisson unleashed a powerful bird with a magnetic wingspan and passion and thickly contoured and flowing lines. Yet she seemed to be beating her wings against the pane of glass that was Florian Magnenet. I had last seen her in December in complete dramatic syncronicity with the brazenly woke and gorgeously expressive body of Audric Bezard in La Dame aux camelias. There they called out, and responded to, all of the emotions embodied by Shakepeare’s Sonnet 88 [The one that begins with “If thou should be disposed to set me light.”] I’d put my draft of a review aside, utterly certain that Bezard and Albisson would be reunited in Swan Lake. Therefore I knew that coming off of that high, seeing her with another guy, was going to be hard to take no matter what. But not this hard. Here Albisson’s Odette was ready to release herself into the moment. But while she tried to engage the cautious and self-effacing Magnenet, synchronicity just didn’t happen. Indeed their rapport once got so confused they lost the counts and ended up elegantly walking around each other at one moment during the grand adagio.

« Durant tout l’acte II, le 26 février, Amandine Albisson a déployé un puissant oiseau doté de magnétiques battements d’ailes, de passion et de lignes à la fois vigoureusement dessinées et fluides. Et pourtant, elle semblait abîmer ses ailes contre la paroi vitrée qu’était Florian Magnenet. »

« A un moment, leur rapport devint si confus qu’ils perdirent les comptes et se retrouvèrent à se tourner autour pendant le grand adage. » […]

This is such a pity. Albisson put all kinds of imagination into variations on the duality of femininity. I particularly appreciated how her Odette’s and Odile’s neck and spine moved in completely differently ways and kept sending new and different energies all the way out to her fingertips and down through her toes. I didn’t need binoculars in Act IV in order to be hit by the physicality of the pure despair of her Odette. Magnenet’s Siegfried had warmed up a little by the end. His back came alive. That was nice.

« Quel dommage, Albisson met toutes sortes d’intentions dans ses variations sur le thème de la dualité féminine. J’ai particulièrement apprécié la façon dont le cou et le dos de son Odette et son Odile se mouvaient de manière complètement différente » […]

Rothbart

The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon the rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid. Proverbs 30:19

François Alu knows how to connect with the audience as well as with everyone on stage. His Tutor/von Rothbart villain, a role puffed up into a really danced one by Nureyev, pretty much took over the narrative. Even before his Act III variation – as startlingly accelerated and decelerated as the flicker of the tongue of a venomous snake – Alu carved out his space with fiery intelligence and chutzpah.

« François Alu a le don d’aimanter les spectateurs. Son tuteur/von Rothbart a peu ou prou volé la vedette au couple principal. Même avant sa variation de l’acte III – aux accélérations et décélérations aussi imprévisibles que les oscillations d’une langue de serpent – Alu a fait sa place avec intelligence et culot. » […]

As the Tutor in Act I, Alu concentrated on insinuating himself as a suave enabler, a lithe opportunist. Throughout the evening, he offered more eye-contact to both Albisson and Magnenet than they seemed to be offering to each other (and yes you can see it from far away: it impels the head and the neck and the spine in a small way that reads large). In the Black Pas, Albisson not only leaned over to catch this von Rothbart’s hints of how to vamp, she then leaned in to him, whispering gleeful reports of her triumph into the ear of this superb partner in crime.

« A l’acte I, en tuteur, Alu s’appliquait à apparaître comme un suave entremetteur, un agile opportuniste. Durant toute la soirée, il a échangé plus de regards aussi bien avec Albisson qu’avec Magnenet que les deux danseurs n’en ont échangé entre eux.

Dans le pas de deux du cygne noir, Albisson ne basculait pas seulement sur ce von Rothbart pour recevoir des conseils de séduction, elle se penchait aussi vers lui pour murmurer à l’oreille de son partenaire en méfaits l’état d’avancée de son triomphe. »

And kudos.

To Francesco Mura, as sharp as a knife in the pas de trois and the Neapolitan. To Marine Ganio’s gentle grace and feathery footwork in the Neapolitan, too. To Bianca Scudamore and Alice Catonnet in the pas de trois. All four of them have the ballon and presence and charisma that make watching dancers dance so addictive. While I may not have found the Holy Grail during this performance of Swan Lake, the lesser Knights of the Round Table – in particular the magnificently precise and plush members of the corps de ballet! – did not let me down.

* The quotes are from the King James version of The Bible.

Commentaires fermés sur Swan Lake in Paris: a chalice half empty or half full?

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

La Dame aux Camélias : histoires de ballerines

Le tombeau d’Alphonsine Plessis

La Dame aux Camélias est un ballet fleuve qui a ses rapides mais aussi ses eaux stagnantes. Neumeier, en décidant courageusement de ne pas demander une partition réorchestrée mais d’utiliser des passages intacts d’œuvres de Chopin a été conduit parfois à quelques longueurs et redites (le « black pas de deux », sur la Balade en sol mineur opus 23, peut sembler avoir trois conclusions si les danseurs ne sont pas en mesure de lui donner une unité). Aussi, pour une soirée réussie de ce ballet, il faut un subtil équilibre entre le couple central et les nombreux rôles solistes (notamment les personnages un tantinet lourdement récurrents de Manon et Des Grieux qui reflètent l’état psychologique des héros) et autres rôles presque mimés (le duc, mais surtout le père, omniprésent et pivot de la scène centrale du ballet). Dans un film de 1976 avec la créatrice du rôle, Marcia Haydée, on peut voir tout le travail d’acteur que Neumeier a demandé à ses danseurs. Costumes, maquillages, mais aussi postures et attitudes sont une évocation plus que plausible de personnages de l’époque romantique. Pour la scène des bals bleu et rouge de l’acte 1, même les danseurs du corps de ballet doivent être dans un personnage. À l’Opéra, cet équilibre a mis du temps à être atteint. Ce n’est peut-être qu’à la dernière reprise que tout s’était mis en place. Après cinq saisons d’interruption et la plupart des titulaires des rôles principaux en retraite, qu’allait-il se passer?

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 7 décembre, Léonore Baulac s’essayait au rôle de Marguerite. On ne pouvait imaginer danseuse plus différente que celles dont nous avons pris l’habitude et qui sont en quelque sorte « commandées » par la créatrice du rôle, Marcia Haydée. Mademoiselle Baulac est très juvénile. Il aurait été dangereux d’essayer de portraiturer une Marguerite Gautier plus âgée que son Armand. Ses dernières interprétations en patchwork, depuis son étoilat, laissaient craindre qu’elle aurait pris cette option. Heureusement, mis à part peut-être la première variation au théâtre, un peu trop conduite et sèche, elle prend, avec son partenaire Mathieu Ganio, l’option qui lui convient le mieux : celle de la jeunesse de l’héroïne de Dumas-fils (dont le modèle, Alphonsine Plessis, mourut à l’âge de 24 ans). Mathieu Ganio est lui aussi, bien que doyen des étoiles masculines de l’Opéra depuis des lustres, un miracle de juvénilité. Il arrive d’ailleurs à la vente aux enchères comme un soupir. Son évanouissement est presque sans poids. Cette jeunesse des héros fait merveille sur le pas de deux mauve. C’est un charmant badinage amoureux. Armand se prend les pieds dans le tapis et ne se vexe pas. Il divertit et fait rire de bon cœur sa Marguerite. Les deux danseurs « jouent » la tergiversation plus qu’ils ne la vivent. Ils se sont déjà reconnus. À l’acte 2, le pas de deux en blanc est dans la même veine. On apprécie l’intimité des portés, la façon dont les dos se collent et se frottent, la sensualité naïve de cette relation. Peut-être pense-t-on aussi que Léonore-Marguerite, dont la peau rayonne d’un éclat laiteux, n’évoque pas exactement une tuberculeuse.

Tout change pourtant dans la confrontation avec le père d’Armand (Yann Saïz, assez passable) où la lumière semble la quitter et où le charmant ovale du visage se creuse sous nos yeux. Le pas de deux de renoncement entre Léonore Baulac et Mathieu Ganio n’est pas sans évoquer la mort de la Sylphide. A posteriori, on se demande même si ce n’est pas à une évocation du ballet entier de Taglioni auquel on a été convié, le badinage innocent du pas-de-deux mauve rappelant les jeux d’attrape-moi si tu peux du premier ballet romantique. Cette option intelligente convient bien à mademoiselle Baulac à ce stade de sa carrière.

Au troisième acte, dans la scène au bois, Léonore-Marguerite apparaît comme vidée de sa substance. Le contraste est volontairement et péniblement violent avec l’apparente bonne santé de l’Olympe d’Héloïse Bourdon. Sur l’ensemble de ce troisième acte, mis à part des accélérations et des alanguissements troublants dans le pas de deux en noir, l’héroïne subit son destin (Ganio est stupidement cruel à souhait pendant la scène de bal) : que peut faire une Sylphide une fois qu’elle a perdu ses ailes ?

La distribution Baulac-Ganio bénéficiait sans doute de la meilleure équipe de seconds rôles. On retrouvait avec plaisir la Prudence, subtil mélange de bonté et de rouerie (la courtisane qui va réussir), de Muriel Zusperreguy aux côtés d’un Paul Marque qui nous convainc sans doute pour la première fois. Le danseur apparaissait enfin au dessus de sa danse et cette insolente facilité donnait ce qu’il faut de bravache à la variation de la cravache. On retrouvait avec un plaisir non dissimulé le comte de N. de Simon Valastro, chef d’œuvre de timing comique (ses chutes et ses maladresses de cornets ou de bouquets sont inénarrables) mais également personnage à part entière qui émeut aussi par sa bonté dans le registre plus grave de l’acte 3.

Eve Grinsztajn retrouvait également dans Manon, un rôle qui lui sied bien. Elle était ce qu’il faut élégante et détachée lors de sa première apparition mais surtout implacable pendant la confrontation entre Marguerite et le père d’Armand. On s’étonnait de la voir chercher ses pieds dans le pas de quatre avec ses trois prétendants qui suit le pas de deux en noir. Très touchante dans la dernière scène au théâtre (la mort de Manon), elle disparaît pourtant et ne revient pas pour le pas-de-trois final (la mort de Marguerite). Son partenaire, Marc Moreau, improvise magistralement un pas deux avec Léonore Baulac. Cette péripétie est une preuve, en négatif, du côté trop récurrent et inorganique du couple Manon-Des Grieux dans le ballet de John Neumeier.

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 14 décembre, c’était au tour de Laura Hecquet d’aborder le rôle de la courtisane au grand cœur de Dumas. Plus grande courtisane que dans « la virginité du vice », un soupçon maniérée, la Marguerite de Laura Hecquet se sait sur la fin. Elle est plus rouée aussi dans la première scène au théâtre. Le grand pas de deux en mauve est plus fait de vas-et-viens, d’abandons initiés suivis de reculs. Laura-Marguerite voudrait rester sur les bords du précipice au fond duquel elle se laisse entraîner. Florian Magnenet est plus virulent, plus ombrageux que Mathieu Ganio. Sa première entrée, durant la scène de vente aux enchères, est très belle. Il se présente, essoufflé par une course échevelée dans Paris. Son évanouissement est autant le fait de l’émotion que de l’épuisement physique. On retrouvera cette même qualité des courses au moment de la lecture de la lettre de rupture : très sec, avec l’énergie il courre de part et d’autres de la scène d’une manière très réaliste. Son mouvement parait désarticulé par la fatigue. A l’inverse, Magnenet a dans la scène au bois des marches de somnambule. Plus que sa partenaire, il touche par son hébétude.

Le couple Hecquet-Magnenet n’est pas pourtant sans quelques carences. Elles résident principalement dans les portés hauts où la danseuse ne semble jamais très à l’aise. Le pas de deux à la campagne est surtout touchant lorsque les deux danseurs glissent et s’emmêlent au sol. Il en est de même dans le pas-de-deux noir, pas tant mémorable pour la partie noire que pour la partie chair, avec des enroulements passionnés des corps et des bras.

Le grand moment pour Laura Hecquet reste finalement la rencontre avec le père. d’Andrei Klemm, vraie figue paternelle, qui ne semble pas compter ses pas comme le précédent (Saïz) mais semble bien hésiter et tergiverser. Marguerite-Laura commence sa confrontation avec des petits développés en 4e sur pointe qui ressemblent à des imprécations, puis se brise. La progression de toute la scène est admirablement menée. Hecquet, ressemble à une Piéta. Le pas deux final de l’acte 2 avec Armand est plus agonie d’Odette qu’une mort Sylphide. Lorsqu’elle pousse son amant à partir, ses bras étirés à l’infini ressemblent à des ailes. C’est absolument poignant.

Le reste des seconds rôles pour cette soirée n’était pas très porteur. On a bien sûr du plaisir à revoir Sabrina Mallem dans un rôle conséquent, mais son élégante Prudence nous laisse juste regretter de ne pas la voir en Marguerite. Axel Magliano se montre encore un peu vert en Gaston Rieux. Il a une belle ligne et un beau ballon, mais sa présence est un peu en berne et il ne domine pas encore tout à fait sa technique dans la variation à la cravache (les pirouettes achevées par une promenade à ronds de jambe). Adrien Bodet n’atteint pas non plus la grâce délicieusement cucul de Valastro. Dans la scène du bal rouge, on ne le reconnait pas forcément dans le pierrot au bracelet de diamants.

On apprécie le face à face entre Florian Magnenet et le Des Grieux de Germain Louvet en raison de leur similitude physique. On reste plus sur la réserve face à la Manon de Ludmilla Pagliero qui ne devient vraiment convaincante que dans les scènes de déchéance de Manon.

*

 *                                                                  *

Le 19 décembre au soir, Amandine Albisson et Audric Bezard faisaient leur entrée dans la Dame aux camélias. Et on a assisté à ce qui sans doute aura été la plus intime, la plus passionnée, la plus absolument satisfaisante des incarnations du couple cette saison. Pour son entrée dans la scène de vente aux enchères, Bezard halète d’émotion. Sa souffrance est réellement palpable. On admire la façon dont cet Armand brisé qui tourne le dos au public se mue sans transition, s’étant retourné durant le changement à vue vers la scène au théâtre, en jeune homme insouciant. Au milieu d’un groupe d’amis bien choisis – Axel Ibot, Gaston incisif et plein d’humour, Sandrine Westermann, Prudence délicieusement vulgaire, Adrien Couvez, comte de N., comique à tendance masochiste et Charlotte Ranson, capiteuse en Olympe – Amandine Albisson est, dès le début, plus une ballerine célébrée (peut être une Fanny Elssler) jouant de son charme, élégante et aguicheuse à la fois, qu’une simple courtisane. Le contraste est d’autant plus frappant que celle qui devrait jouer une danseuse, Sae Eun Park, ne brille que par son insipidité. Dommage pour Fabien Révillion dont la ligne s’accorde bien à celle d’Audric Bezard dans les confrontations Armand-Des Grieux.

Le pas-de-deux mauve fait des étincelles. Armand-Audric, intense, introduit dans ses pirouettes arabesque des décentrements vertigineux qui soulignent son exaltation mais également la violence de sa passion. Marguerite-Amandine, déjà conquise, essaye de garder son bouillant partenaire dans un jeu de séduction policé. Mais elle échoue à le contrôler. Son étonnement face aux élans de son partenaire nous fait inconditionnellement adhérer à leur histoire.

Le Bal à la robe rouge (une section particulièrement bien servie par le corps de ballet) va à merveille à Amandine Albisson qui y acquiert définitivement à nos yeux un vernis « Cachucha ».

Dans la scène à la campagne, les pas de deux Bezard-Albisson ont immédiatement une charge émotionnelle et charnelle. Audric Bezard accomplit là encore des battements détournés sans souci du danger.

L’élan naturel de ce couple est brisé par l’intervention du père (encore Yann Saïz). Amandine Albisson n’est pas dans l’imprécation mais immédiatement dans la supplication. Après la pose d’orante, qui radoucit la dignité offusquée de monsieur Duval, Albisson fait un geste pour se tenir le front très naturel. Puis elle semble pendre de tout son poids dans les bras de ses partenaires successifs, telle une âme exténuée.

C’est seulement avec la distribution Albisson-Bezard que l’on a totalement adhéré à la scène au bois et remarqué combien le ballet de John Neumeier était également construit comme une métaphore des saisons et du temps qui passe (le ballet commence à la fin de l’hiver et l’acte 1 annonce le printemps ; l’acte 2 est la belle saison et le 3 commence en automne pour s’achever en plein hiver). Dans cette scène, Albisson se montre livide, comme égarée. La rencontre est poignante : l’immobilité lourde de sens d’Armand (qui semble absent jusque dans son badinage avec Olympe), la main de Marguerite qui touche presque les cheveux de son ex-amant sont autant de détails touchants. Le pas de deux en noir affole par ses accélérations vertigineuses et par la force érotique de l’emmêlement des lignes. Audric Bezard est absolument féroce durant la scène du bal. C’est à ce moment qu’il tue sa partenaire. De dernières scènes, il ne nous reste que le l’impression dans la rétine du fard rouge de Marguerite rayonnant d’un éclat funèbre sous son voile noir.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

4 Commentaires

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

La Dame aux camélias, Chopin-Neumeier, Paris Opera Ballet, Palais Garnier, December 7th and 14th, 2018.

In Alexander Dumas Jr’s tale, two kinds of texts are paramount: a leather-bound copy of Manon Lescaut that gets passed from hand to hand, and then the so many other words that a young, loving, desperate, and dying courtesan scribbles down in defense of her right to love and be loved. John Neumeier’s ballet seeks to bring the unspoken to life.

*

*                                                     *

In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire/That on the ashes of […] youth doth lie […] Consumed with that which it was nourished by./ This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,/To love that well which thou must leave ere long.”
Shakepeare, Sonnet 73

Léonore Baulac, Mathieu Ganio, La Dame au camélias, December 7, 2018.

On December 7th, Léonore Baulac’s youthful and playful and feisty Marguerite evoked those posthumous stories on YouTube that memorialize a dead young person’s upbeat videos about living with cancer.

Normally, the bent-in elbows and wafting forearms are played as a social construct: “My hands say ‘blah, blah, blah.’ Isn’t that what you expect to hear?” Baulac used the repeated elbows-in gestures to release her forearms: the shapes that ensued made one think the extremities were the first part of her frame that had started to die, hands cupped in as if no longer able to resist the heavy weight of the air. Yet she kept seeking joy and freedom, a Traviata indeed.

The febrile energy of Baulac’s Marguerite responded quickly to Mathieu Ganio’s delicacy and fiery gentility, almost instantly finding calm whenever she could brush against the beauty of his body and soul. She could breathe in his arms and surrender to his masterful partnering. The spirit of Dumas Jr’s original novel about seize-the-day young people came to life. Any and every lift seemed controlled, dangerous, free, and freshly invented, as if these kids were destined to break into a playground at night.

From Bernhardt to Garbo to Fonteyn, we’ve seen an awful lot of actresses pretending that forty is the new twenty-four. Here that was not the case. Sometimes young’uns can act up a storm, too!

*                                                     *

Tired with all these, from these would I be gone,/Save that, to die, I leave my love alone.
Sonnet 66

Laura Hecquet, Florian Magnenet, La Dame aux camélias, December 14, 2018

On December 14th, Laura Hecquet indeed played older and wiser and more fragile and infinitely more melancholy and acceptant of her doom from the beginning than the rebellious Baulac. Even Hecquet’s first coughs seemed more like sneezes, as if she were allergic to her social destiny. I was touched by the way she often played at slow-mo ralentis that she could stitch in against the music as if she were reviewing the story of her life from the great beyond. For most of Act One Hecquet seemed too studied and poised. I wanted to shake her by the shoulders. I wondered if she would ever, ever just let go during the rest of the ballet. Maybe that was just her way of thinking Marguerite out loud? I would later realize that the way she kept delicately tracing micro-moods within moods defined the signature of her interpretation of Marguerite.

Only a Florian Magnenet – who has finally taken detailed control of all the lines of his body, especially his feet, yet who has held on to all of his his youthful energy and power – could awaken this sleeping beauty. At first he almost mauled the object of his desires in an eager need to shake her out of her clearly-defined torpor. Something began to click.

The horizontal swoops of the choreography suited this couple. Swirling mid-height lifts communicated to the audience exactly what swirling mid-height lifts embody: you’ve swept me off my feet. But Hecquet got too careful around the many vertical lifts that are supposed to mean even more. When you don’t just take a big gulp of air while saying to yourself “I feel light as a feather/hare krishna/you make me feel like dancin’!” and hurl your weight up to the rafters, you weigh down on your partner, no matter how strong he is. Nothing disastrous, nevertheless: unless the carefully-executed — rather than the ecstatic — disappoints you.

Something I noticed that I wish I hadn’t: Baulac took infinite care to tenderly sweep her fluffy skirts out of Ganio’s face during lifts and made it seem part of their play. Hecquet let her fluffy skirts go where they would to the point of twice rendering Magnenet effectively blind. Instead of taking care of him, Hecquet repeatedly concentrated on keeping her own hair off her face. I leave it to you as to the dramatic impact, but there is something called “telling your hairdresser what you want.” Should that fail, there is also a most useful object called “bobby-pin,” which many ballerinas have used before and has often proved less distracting to most of the audience.

*

*                                                     *

When thou reviewest this, thou dost review/ The very part was consecrate to thee./The earth can have but earth, which is his due;/My spirit is thine, the better part of me.
Sonnet 74

Of Manons and about That Father
Alexandre Dumas Jr. enfolded texts within texts in “La Dame aux camélias:” Marguerite’s diary, sundry letters, and a volume of l’Abbé Prévost’s both scandalous albeit moralizing novel about a young woman gone astray, “Manon Lescaut.” John Neumeier decided to make the downhill trajectory of Manon and her lover Des Grieux a leitmotif — an intermittent momento mori – that will literally haunt the tragedy of Marguerite and Armand. Manon is at first presented as an onstage character observed and applauded by the others on a night out,  but then she slowly insinuates herself into Marguerite’s subconscious. As in: you’ve become a whore, I am here to remind you that there is no way out.

On the 14th, Ludmila Pagliero was gorgeous. The only problem was that until the last act she seemed to think she was doing the MacMillan version of Manon. On the 7th, a more sensual and subtle Eve Grinsztajn gave the role more delicacy, but then provided real-time trouble. Something started to give out, and she never showed up on stage for the final pas de trois where Manon and des Grieux are supposed to ease Marguerite into accepting the inevitable. Bravo to Marc Moreau’s and Léonore Baulac’s stage smarts, their deep knowledge of the choreography, their acting chops, and their talent for improvisation. The audience suspected nothing. Most only imagined that Marguerite, in her terribly lonely last moments, found more comfort in fiction than in life.

Neumeier – rather cruelly – confines Armand’s father to sitting utterly still on the downstage right lip of the stage for too much of the action. Some of those cast in this role do appear to be thinking, or breathing at the very least. But on December 7th, even when called upon to move, the recently retired soloist Yann Saïz seemed made of marble, his eyes dead. Mr. Duval may be an uptight bourgeois, but he is also an honest provincial who has journeyed up from the South and is unused to Parisian ways. Saïz’s monolithic interpretation did indeed make Baulac seem even more vulnerable in the confrontation scene, much like a moth trying to break away by beating its wings against a pane of glass. But his stolid interpretation made me wonder whether those in the audience who were new to this ballet didn’t just think her opponent was yet another duke.

On December 14th, Andrey Klemm, who also teaches company class, found a way to embody a lifetime of regret by gently calibrating those small flutters of hands, the stuttering movements where you start in one direction then stop, sit down, pop up, look here, look there, don’t know what to do with your hands. Klemm’s interpretation of Mr. Duval radiated a back-story: that of a man who once, too, may have fallen inappropriately in love and been forced to obey society’s rules. As gentle and rueful as a character from Edith Wharton, you could understand that he recognized his younger self in his son.

Commentaires fermés sur La Dame aux camélias in Paris. Love: better find it late than never.

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

John Kriza, creator of the « romantic guy » in Fancy Free in 1944. Press photo.

Paris, Palais Garnier, November 6 and 13, 2018

FANCY FREE

Would the “too elegant dancers of Paris” – as American critics decry them – be able to “get down” and frolic their way through the so ‘merican Fancy Free? Would they know how to chew gum like da guys and play like wise-asses? Just who should be blamed for the cost of leasing this genre ballet from the Robbins Trust? If Robbins, who had delighted in staging so many of his ballets on the Paris company, had left this one to other companies for all these years…did he have a good reason?

On November 6th, the dancing, the acting, was not even “too elegant.” Everyone danced small. The ensemble’s focus was so low key that the ballet became lugubrious, weightless, charmless, an accumulation of pre-fab schtick. I have never paid more attention to what the steps are called, never spent the span of Fancy Free analyzing the phrases (oh yeah, this one ends with more double tours to the right) and groaning inwardly at all the “business.” First chewing gum scene? Invisible. Chomp the gum, guys! For the reprise, please don’t make it so ridiculously obvious that another three sticks were also hidden behind the lamppost by the stagehands. I have never said to myself: aha, let’s repeat “now we put our arms around each others’ shoulders and try hard to look like pals while not getting armpit sweat on each others’ costumes.” Never been so bored by unvaryingly slow double pirouettes and by the fake beers being so sloppily lifted that they clearly looked fake. The bar brawl? Lethargic and well nigh invisible (and I was in a place with good visibility).

Then the women. That scene where the girl with the red purse gets teased – an oddly wooden Alice Renavand — utterly lacked sass and became rather creepy and belligerent. As the dream girl in purple, Eleonora Abbagnato wafted a perfume of stiff poise. Ms. Purple proved inappropriately condescending and un-pliant: “I will now demonstrate the steps while wearing the costume of the second girl.“ She acted like a mildly amused tourist stuck in some random country. Karl Paquette had already been stranded by his male partners before he even tried to hit on this female: an over-interiorized Stéphane Bullion (who would nevertheless manage to hint at tiny little twinkles of humor in his tightly-wound rumba) and a François Alu emphatically devoted to defending his space. Face to face with the glacial Abbagnato, Paquette even gave up trying to make their duet sexy. This usually bright and alive dancing guy resigned himself to trying to salvage a limp turn around the floor by two very boring white people.

Then Aurelia Bellet sauntered in as the third girl –clearly amused that her wig was possessed by a character all on its own – and owned the joint. This girl would know how to snap her gum. I wanted the ballet to begin afresh.

A week later, on the 13th, the troops came ashore. Alessio Carbone (as the sailor who practically wants to split his pants in half), Paul Marque (really interesting as the dreamer: beautiful pliés anchored a legato unspooling of never predictable movement), and Alexandre Gasse (as a gleeful and carefree rumba guy) hit those buddy poses without leaving room for gusts of air to pass between them. Bounce and energy and humor came back into the streets of New York when they just tossed off those very tight Popeye flexes as little jokes, not poses, which is what they are supposed to be. The tap dancing riffs came off as natural, and you could practically hear them sayin’ “I wanna beer, I wanna girl.” Valentine Colasante radiated cool amusement and the infinite ways she reacted to every challenge in the “hand-off the big red purse” sequence established her alpha womanly dominance. Because of her subtle and reactive acting, there was not a creep in sight. Dorothée Gilbert, as the dame in purple, held on to the dreamy sweetness of the ballerina she’d already given in Robbins’s The Concert some years ago, and then took it forward. During the duet, she seemed to lead Marque, as acutely in tune with how to control a man’s reactions, as Colasante had just a few moments before. Sitting at the little table, watching the men peacock around, Gilbert’s body and face remained vivid and alive.

A SUITE OF DANCES

Sonia Wieder-Atherton concentrated deeply on her score and on her cello, emitting lovely sounds and offering a challenge to the dancing soloists. They were not going to get any of the kind of gimlet eye contact a Ma or a Rostropovich – or a rehearsal pianist – might have provided. On November 6th Matthias Heymann and on November 13th Hugo Marchand reacted to this absent but vibrating onstage presence in their own distinctive ways.

Heymann infused the falsely improvised aspect of the choreography with a sense of reminiscence. Sitting on the ground upstage and leaning back to look at her at the outset, you could feel he’d already just danced the thing one way. And we’d never see it. He’d dance it now differently, maybe in a more diffused manner. And, as he settled downstage at her feet once again at the end, you imagined how he would continue on and on, always the gentleman caller. Deeply rooted movement had spiraled out in an unending flow of elegant and deep inspiration, in spite of the musician who had ignored him. Strangely, this gave the audience the sense of being allowed to peek through a half-open studio door. We were witnessing a brilliant dancer whose body will never stop if music is around. Robbins should have called this piece “Isadora,” for it embodies all the principles the mother of modern dance called for: spontaneous and joyous movement engendered by opening up your ears and soul to how the music sings within you.

Heymann’s body is a pliant rectangle; Marchand’s a broad-shouldered triangle. Both types, I should point out, would fit perfectly into Leonardo’s outline of the Vitruvian Man. Where your center of gravity lies makes you move differently. The art is in learning how to use what nature has given you. If these two had been born in another time and place, I could see Merce Cunningham latching on to Heymann’s purity of motion and Paul Taylor eyeing the catch-me-if-you-dare quality of Marchand.

Marchand’s Suite proved as playful, as in and out and around the music while seeking how to fill this big empty stage as Heymann’s had, but with a bit more of the sense of a seagull wooing his reluctant cellist hen. Marchand seemed more intent upon wooing us as well, whereas Heymann had kept his eye riven on his private muse.

Both made me listen to Bach as if the music had just been composed for them, afresh.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

AFTERNOON OF A FAUN

It’s a hot sweaty day in a New York studio. A guy is stretching out all those ligaments, waiting for the next rehearsal or class. A freshly showered girl passes by the classroom door and pushes herself through that half-open studio door. Both – and this is such a dancer thing – are obsessed with how they look in the mirror…for better, for worse? When you are a young dancer, boy do you read into that studio mirror: who am I? Maybe I can like what I see? How can I make myself look better?

On the 6th, there was Marchand and here came Amandine Albisson. Albisson almost hissed “look at my shiny, shiny, new pointe shoes!” This may sound weird to say, but that little Joseph Cornell box of a set seemed too small for two such vibrant personas and for the potential of such shiny shoes. Both dancers aimed their movements out of and beyond that box in a never-ending flow of movement that kept catching the waves of Debussy’s sea of sound. The way that Marchand communicated that he could smell her fragrance. The way that fantastically taut and pliant horizontal lift seemed to surf. The way Albisson crisped up her fingers and wiggled them up through his almost embrace as if her arms were sails ready to catch the wind. The way he looked at her – “what, you don’t just exist in the mirror?” – right before he kissed her. It was a dream.

Unfortunately, Léonore Baulac and Germain Louvet do not necessarily a couple make, and the pair delivered a most awkward interpretation on the night of the 13th, complete with wobbly feet and wobbly hands in the partnering and the lifts were mostly so-so sort-of. Baulac danced dry and sharp and overemphatic – almost kicking her extensions – and Louvet just didn’t happen. Rapture and the way that time can stop when you are simply dancing for yourself, not for an audience quite yet, just didn’t happen either. I hope they were both just having an off night?

Afternoon of a Faun : Amandine Albisson et Hugo Marchand

GLASS PIECES

I had the same cast both nights, and I am furious. Who the hell told people – especially the atomic couples – to grin like sailors during the first movement? Believe me, if you smiled on New York’s streets back in 1983, you were either an idiot or a tourist.

But what really fuels my anger: the utter waste of Florian Magnenet in the central duet, dancing magnificently, and pushing his body as if his arms were thrusting through the thick hot humidity of Manhattan summer air. He reached out from deep down in his solar plexus and branched out his arms towards his partner as if to rescue her from an onrushing subway train and…Sae Eun Park placed her hand airlessly in the proper position, as she has for years now. Would some American company please whisk her out of here? She’s cookie-cutter efficient, but I’ll be damned if I would call her elegant. Elegance comes from a deep place. It’s thoughtful and weighty and imparts a rich sense of history and identity. It’s not about just hitting the marks. Elegance comes from the inside out. It cannot be faked from the outside in.

Commentaires fermés sur Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins à Paris : hommage passe et manque…

Je ne sais pas ce qu’il en est pour vous, mais moi, désormais, quand l’intitulé d’un spectacle du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris commence par le mot « Hommage », mon sixième sens commence à s’affoler. On en a trop vu, ces dernières années, d’hommages incomplets ou au rabais pour être tout à fait rassuré. J’aurais aimé que l’hommage à Jerome Robbins, qui aurait eu cent ans cette année, échappe à la fatale règle. Mais non. Cette fois-ci encore, on est face à une soirée « presque, mais pas ». La faute en est à l’idée saugrenue qui a conduit les décideurs à intégrer Fancy Free, le premier succès américain de Robbins, au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris. Car au risque de choquer l’esprit français, incorrigiblement universaliste, il faut reconnaitre qu’il y a des œuvres de valeur qui ne se transposent pas. Elles sont d’une sphère culturelle, parfois même d’une époque, sans être pour autant anecdotique ou datées. C’est le cas pour Fancy Free, ce moment dans la vie de marins de 1944, créé par un Robbins d’à peine 26 ans.

Lors d’une des premières présentations européennes, durant l’été 1946 à Londres, le critique Arnold Haskell notait

« Les [ballets] américains, Fancy Free, Interplay et On Stage, étaient dans un idiome familier aux fans de cinéma mais interprété si superbement par des danseurs de formation classique, qu’ils sont apparus comme quelque chose de nouveau. La vitalité de ces jeunes américains, leur beauté physique a tout emporté. Quelques-uns ont demandé « mais est-ce du ballet ? » […] Bien sûr c’est du ballet ; du ballet américain »

Car plus que la comédie musicale de Broadway (auquel Robbins, de concert avec Leonard Bernstein, ne se frottera en tant que créateur qu’avec On The Town), c’est au cinéma et à Fred Astaire que fait référence Fancy Free. La troisième variation de marin, cette rumba que Jerry Robbins créa pour lui-même, est une référence à peine déguisée à une scène de « You were Never Lovelier », un film de 1942 où le grand Fred partage l’affiche avec Rita Hayworth.

Et c’est sans doute ce qui fait que ce ballet n’est guère aujourd’hui encore appréhendable que par des danseurs américains pour qui le tap dancing est quelque chose d’intégré, quelque chose qu’ils ont très souvent rencontré dès l’école primaire à l’occasion d’un musical de fin d’année. L’esthétique militaire des années de guerre, -une période considérée comme tendue mais heureuse- de même que Fred Astaire ou Rita Hayworth font partie de l’imaginaire collectif américain.

Sur cette série parisienne, on a assisté à des quarts de succès ou à d’authentiques flops. La distribution de la première (vue le 6/11) est hélas plutôt caractérisée par le flop. Tout est faux. Le tap dancing n’est pas inné, les sautillés déséquilibrés sont précautionneux. Surtout, les interactions pantomimes entre les marins manquent totalement de naturel. Au bar, les trois compères portent par deux fois un toast. Messieurs Alu, Paquette et Bullion brandissent tellement violemment leurs pintes que, dans la vie réelle, ils auraient éclaboussé le plafond et n’auraient plus rien eu à boire dans leur bock. Lorsqu’ils se retournent vers le bar, leurs dos arrondis n’expriment rien. On ne sent pas l’alcool qui descend trop vite dans leur estomac. François Alu qui est pourtant le plus près du style et vend sa variation pyrotechnique avec son efficacité coutumière, était rentré dans le bar en remuant plutôt bien des épaules mais en oubliant de remuer du derrière. Karl Paquette manque de naïveté dans sa variation et Stéphane Bullion ne fait que marquer les chaloupés de sa rumba. Les filles sont encore moins dans le style. Là encore, ce sont les dos qui pèchent. Alice Renavand, fille au sac rouge le garde trop droit. Cela lui donne un air maussade pendant toute sa première entrée. La scène du vol du sac par les facétieux marins prend alors une teinte presque glauque. Eleonora Abbagnato, dans son pas de deux avec Karl Paquette, est marmoréenne. Ses ronds de jambe au bras de son partenaire suivis d’un cambré n’entraînent pas le couple dans le mouvement. C’est finalement la fille en bleu (Aurélia Bellet), une apparition tardive, qui retient l’attention et fait sourire.

La seconde distribution réunissant Alessio Carbone, Paul Marque et Alexandre Gasse (vue le 9/11) tire son épingle du jeu. L’énergie des pirouettes et l’interprétation de détail peuvent laisser à désirer (Paris n’est pas le spécialiste du lancer de papier chewing-gum) mais le rapport entre les trois matelots est plus naturel. Surtout, les filles sont plus crédibles. Valentine Colasante, fille au sac rouge, fait savoir très clairement qu’elle goûte les trois marins en goguette ; la scène du vol du sac redevient un charmant badinage. Dorothée Gilbert évoquerait plus la petite femme de Paris qu’une new-yorkaise mais son duo avec Paul Marque dégage ce qu’il faut de sensualité. On ne peut néanmoins s’empêcher de penser qu’il est bizarre, pour ce ballet, de focaliser plus sur les filles que sur les trois garçons.

Voilà une addition au répertoire bien dispensable. Le ballet, qui est en son genre un incontestable chef-d’œuvre mais qui paraît au mieux ici une aimable vieillerie, ne pouvait servir les danseurs. Et c’est pourtant ce que devrait faire toute œuvre rentrant au répertoire. Transposer Fancy Free à Paris, c’était nécessairement condamner les danseurs français à l’imitation et conduire à des comparaisons désavantageuses. Imaginerait-on Carmen de Roland Petit rentrer au répertoire du New York City Ballet ? S’il fallait absolument une entrée au répertoire, peut-être aurait-il fallu se demander quels types d’œuvres le chorégraphe lui-même décidait-il de donner à la compagnie de son vivant : des ballets qui s’enrichiraient d’une certaine manière de leur confrontation avec le style français et qui enrichiraient en retour les interprètes parisiens. Et s’il fallait un ballet « Broadway » au répertoire du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris, pourquoi ne pas avoir choisi Interplay ? La scène en ombre chinoise du deuxième mouvement aurait été une jolie préfiguration du mouvement central de Glass Pieces et les danseurs maison auraient pu travailler la prestesse américaine et les accents jazzy sans grever le budget avec la fabrication de coûteux décors…

*

 *                                       *

La partie centrale du spectacle, séparée par un entracte, est constitué de deux valeurs sûres régulièrement présentée par le ballet de l’Opéra. A Suite of Dances, entré au répertoire après la mort du grand Jerry avec Manuel Legris comme interprète, est un riche vecteur pour de grands interprètes, beaucoup moins pour des danseurs moins inspirés. Dans ce dernier cas, le côté œuvre d’occasion créée sur les qualités de son créateur – Mikhaïl Baryshnikov – peut malheureusement ressortir. Cette regrettable éventualité nous aura fort heureusement été épargnée. Aussi bien Mathias Heymann qu’Hugo Marchand, qui gomment l’aspect cabotin de l’interprète original, ont quelque chose de personnel à faire passer dans leur dialogue avec la violoncelliste Sonia Wieder-Atherton. Heymann (le 6/11) est indéniablement élégant mais surtout absolument dionysiaque. Il y a quelque chose du Faune ou de l’animal dans la façon dont il caresse le sol avec ses pieds dans les petites cloches durant la première section. Son mouvement ne s’arrête que lorsque l’instrument a fini de sonner. Pendant le troisième mouvement, réflexif, il semble humer la musique et on peut littéralement la voir s’infuser dans le corps de l’animal dansant que devient Mathias Heymann.  L’instrumentiste, presque trop concentrée sur son violoncelle ne répond peut-être pas assez aux appels pleins de charme du danseur. Avec Hugo Marchand, on est dans un tout autre registre. Élégiaque dans le mouvement lent, mais plein de verve (magnifié par une batterie cristalline) sur le 2e mouvement rapide, Hugo Marchand reste avant tout un danseur. Il interrompt une série de facéties chorégraphiques par un très beau piqué arabesque agrémenté d’un noble port de bras. À l’inverse d’Heymann, son mouvement s’arrête mais cela n’a rien de statique. L’interprète semble suspendu à l’écoute de la musique. Cette approche va mieux à Sonia Wieder-Atherton. On se retrouve face à deux instrumentistes qui confrontent leur art et testent les limites de leur instrument respectif.

 *                               *

Dans Afternoon of a Faun, le jeune danseur étoile avait été moins à l’unisson de sa partenaire (le 6). Hugo Marchand dansait la subtile relecture du Faune de Nijinsky aux côtés d’Amandine Albisson. Les deux danseurs montrent pourtant de fort belles choses. Lui, est admirable d’intériorité durant toute la première section, absorbé dans un profond exercice de proprioception. Amandine Albisson est ce qu’il faut belle et mystérieuse. Ses développés à la barre sont d’une indéniable perfection formelle. Mais les deux danseurs semblent hésiter sur l’histoire qu’ils veulent raconter. Ils reviennent trop souvent, comme à rebours, vers le miroir et restent tous deux sur le même plan. Ni l’un ni l’autre ne prend la main, et ne transmue donc la répétition de danse en une entreprise de séduction. L’impression est toute autre pendant la soirée du 9 novembre. Audric Bezard, à la beauté plastique époustouflante, est narcissique à souhait devant le miroir. Il ajuste sa ceinture avec un contentement visible. Lorsque Myriam Ould-Braham entre dans le studio , il est évident qu’il veut la séduire et qu’il pense réussir sans peine. Mais, apparemment absente, la danseuse s’impose en maîtresse du jeu. On voit au fur et à mesure le jeune danseur se mettre au diapason du lyrisme de sa partenaire. Le baiser final n’est pas tant un charme rompu qu’une sorte de sort jeté. Myriam Ould-Braham devient presque brumeuse. Elle disparaît plutôt qu’elle ne sort du studio. Le danseur aurait-il rêvé sa partenaire idéale?

*

 *                                       *

Le ballet qui clôturait l’Hommage 2018 à Jerome Robbins avait sans doute pour certains balletomanes l’attrait de la nouveauté. Glass Pieces n’avait pas été donné depuis la saison 2004-2005, où il était revenu d’ailleurs après dix ans d’éclipse. En cela, le ballet de Robbins est emblématique de la façon dont le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris traite – ou maltraite plutôt – son répertoire. Entré en novembre 1991, il avait été repris, du vivant de Robbins, en 1994 puis en 1995. Pour tout dire, on attendait plutôt un autre retour, celui de The Four Seasons, le dernier cadeau de Robbins au ballet de l’Opéra en 1996. Cette œuvre, dont les soli féminins sont constamment présentés par les artistes du corps de ballet lors du concours de promotion, aurait eu l’avantage d’utiliser dans un idiome plus classique le corps de ballet et aurait permis de multiples possibilités de distribution solistes et demi-solistes. Il n’en a pas été décidé ainsi. Glass Pieces, qui est en son genre un chef-d’œuvre avec son utilisation quasi graphique des danseurs évoluant sur fond de quadrillage tantôt comme des clusters, tantôt comme une délicate frise antique ou enfin tels des volutes tribales, n’a pas été nécessairement bien servi cette saison. Durant le premier mouvement, on se demande qui a bien pu dire aux trois couples de demi-solistes de sourire comme s’ils étaient des ados pré-pubères invités à une fête d’anniversaire. Plus grave encore, le mouvement central a été, les deux soirs où j’ai vu le programme, dévolu à Sae Eun Park. La danseuse, aux côtés de Florent Magnenet, ravale la chorégraphie « statuaire » de Robbins, où les quelques instants d’immobilité doivent avoir autant de valeur que les sections de danse pure, à une succession de minauderies néoclassiques sans signification. Les deux premières incarnations du rôle, Marie-Claude Pietragalla et Elisabeth Platel, vous faisaient passer une après-midi au Met Museum. L’une, accompagnée de Kader Belarbi, avait l’angularité d’un bas relief égyptien, l’autre, aux bras de Wilfried Romoli, évoquait les parois d’un temple assyrien sur laquelle serait sculptée une chasse aux lions. Comme tout cela semble loin…

La prochaine fois que la direction du ballet de l’Opéra voudra saluer un grand chorégraphe disparu qui a compté dans son Histoire, je lui conseille de troquer le mot « hommage » pour celui de « célébration ». En mettant la barre plus haut, elle parviendra, peut être, à se hisser à la hauteur d’une part de l’artiste qu’elle prétend honorer et d’autre part à de la belle et riche génération de jeunes danseurs dont elle est dotée aujourd’hui.

Interplay. 1946. Photographie Baron. Haskell écrivait : « C’est une interprétation dansée de la musique, un remarquable chef d’oeuvre d’artisanat où le classicisme rencontre l’idiome moderne, nous procurant de la beauté, de l’esprit, de la satire, de l’humour et une pincée de vulgarité ».

 

3 Commentaires

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Les Balletos d’or 2017-2018

Les Balletos d’Or sont en crise. Pour la saison 2017-2018, les organisateurs avaient promis de se renouveler, sortir du cercle étroit de leurs chouchous, et attribuer leurs prix si convoités à de nouvelles recrues. Mais certains s’accrochent à leurs amours anciennes comme une arapède à son rocher. Et puis, la dernière saison a-t-elle été si riche que cela en coups de foudres nouveaux ? On pouvait en débattre. Bref, il a fallu composer. Voici notre liste chabada : un vieux collage, une nouvelle toquade, un vieux collage.

 

 

 

Ministère de la Création franche

Prix Création : Yugen de Wayne McGregor  (réglé sur les Chichester Psalms de Bernstein)

Prix Réécriture chorégraphique : Casse Noisette de Kader Belarbi (Ballet du Capitole)

Prix Inspiration N de Thierry Malandain (Malandain Ballet Biarritz)

Prix Va chercher la baballe : Alexander Ekman (Play)

Prix musical : Kevin O’Hare pour le programme Hommage à Bernstein (Royal Ballet)

  

Ministère de la Loge de Côté

Prix Communion : Amandine Albisson et Hugo Marchand (Diamants)

Prix Versatilité : Alexis Renaud, mâle prince Grémine (Onéguine) et Mère Simone meneuse de revue (La Fille mal gardée).

Prix dramatique : Yasmine Naghdi et Federico Bonelli (Swan Lake, Londres)

Prix fraîcheur : Myriam Ould-Braham et Mathias Heymann dans La Fille mal gardée d’Ashton (toujours renouvelée)

Prix saveur : Joaquin De Luz, danseur en brun de Dances At A Gathering (Etés de la Danse 2018)

Prix Jouvence : Simon Valastro fait ses débuts dans mère Simone (La Fille mal gardée)

 

Ministère de la Place sans visibilité

Prix poétique : David Moore (Brouillards de Cranko, Stuttgart)

Prix orphique : Renan Cerdeiro du Miami City Ballet dans Other Dances de Robbins (Etés de la Danse 2018)

Prix marlou : François Alu dans Rubis (Balanchine)

Prix dramatique : Julie Charlet et Ramiro Gómez Samón dans L’Arlésienne de Petit (Ballet du Capitole)

Prix fatum : Audric Bezard, Onéguine très tchaikovskien (Onéguine, Cranko)

 

Ministère de la Ménagerie de scène

Prix Canasson : Sara Mearns, danseuse mauve monolithique dans Dances At A Gathering (Etés de la Danse 2018)

Prix Tendre Bébête : Mickaël Conte, La Belle et la Bête de Thierry Malandain

Prix Derviche-Tourneur : Philippe Solano (Casse-Noisette, Toulouse)

Prix Fondation Brigitte Bardot : Michaël Grünecker, Puck maltraité du Songe de Jean Christophe Maillot

Prix Sauvez la biodiversité : Le Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris pour son hémorragie de talents partis voir si l’herbe est plus verte ailleurs. (Trois exemplaires du trophée seront remis à Eléonore Guérineau, Vincent Chaillet et Yannick Bittencourt)

 

Ministère de la Natalité galopante

Prix Adultère : Ludmilla Pagliero et Mathias Heymann (Don Quichotte)

Prix Ciel Mon Mari ! : Myriam Ould-Braham et Karl Paquette (Don Quichotte)

Prix du Cou de Pied : Joseph Caley (English National Ballet, Sleeping Beauty)

Prix Sensualité : Alicia Amatriain (Lac des cygnes, Stuttgart)

Prix Maturité : Florian Magnenet (Prince Grémine, Onéguine)

Prix de l’Attaque : MM. Marchand, Louvet, Magnenet et Bezard (Agon, Balanchine)

 

Ministère de la Collation d’Entracte

Prix Gourmand : Non décerné (l’époque n’est décidément pas aux agapes)

Prix Pain sans levain : Le programme du Pacific Northwest Ballet aux Etés de la Danse 2018

Prix Carême: la première saison d’Aurélie Dupont à l’Opéra de Paris

Prix Pénitence : la prochaine saison d’Aurélie Dupont à l’Opéra de Paris

 

Ministère de la Couture et de l’Accessoire

Prix Fashion Victim: Aurélie Dupont (pour l’ensemble de son placard)

Prix Ceinture de Lumière : les costumes de Frôlons  (James Thierrée)

Prix Fatals tonnelets : les costumes de la danse espagnole du Lac de Cranko (Stuttgart)

 

Ministère de la Retraite qui sonne

Prix Les Pieds dans le tapis : Laëtitia Pujol, des adieux manqués dans Émeraudes par une bien belle danseuse.

Prix Très mal : Marie-Agnès Gillot qui ne comprend pas pourquoi la retraite à 42 ans ½, ce n’est pas que pour les autres.

Louis Frémolle par Gavarni. « Les petits mystères de l’Opéra ».

Commentaires fermés sur Les Balletos d’or 2017-2018

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique