Archives de Tag: A Suite of Dances

Pas de deux at the Paris Opera Ballet : Baby Can YOU drive my car?

The extended apron thrust forward across where the orchestra should have been gave many seats at the Palais Garnier – already not renowned for visibility — scant sightlines unless you were in a last row and could stand up and tilt forward. Were these two “it’s a gala/not a gala” programs worth attending? Yes and/or no.

Evening  Number One: “Nureyev” on Thursday, October 8, at the Palais Garnier.

Nureyev’s re-thinkings of the relationship between male and female dancers always seek to tweak the format of the male partner up and out from glorified crane operator into that of race car driver. But that foot on the gas was always revved up by a strong narrative context.

Nutcracker pas de deux Acts One and Two

Gilbert generously offers everything to a partner and the audience, from her agile eyes through her ever-in-motion and vibrantly tensile body. A street dancer would say “the girlfriend just kills it.” Her boyfriend for this series, Paul Marque, first needs to learn how to live.

At the apex of the Act II pas of Nuts, Nureyev inserts a fiendishly complex and accelerating airborne figure that twice ends in a fish dive, of course timed to heighten a typically overboard Tchaikovsky crescendo. Try to imagine this: the stunt driver is basically trying to keep hold of the wheel of a Lamborghini with a mind of its own that suddenly goes from 0 to 100, has decided to flip while doing a U-turn, and expects to land safe and sound and camera-ready in the branches of that tree just dangling over the cliff.  This must, of course, be meticulously rehearsed even more than usual, as it can become a real hot mess with arms, legs, necks, and tutu all in getting in the way.  But it’s so worth the risk and, even when a couple messes up, this thing can give you “wow” shivers of delight and relief. After “a-one-a-two-a-three,” Marque twice parked Gilbert’s race car as if she were a vintage Trabant. Seriously: the combination became unwieldy and dull.

Marque continues to present everything so carefully and so nicely: he just hasn’t shaken off that “I was the best student in the class “ vibe. But where is the urge to rev up?  Smiling nicely just doesn’t do it, nor does merely getting a partner around from left to right. He needs to work on developing a more authoritative stage presence, or at least a less impersonal one.

 

Cendrillon

A ballerina radiating just as much oomph and chic and and warmth as Dorothée Gilbert, Alice Renavand grooved and spun wheelies just like the glowing Hollywood starlet of Nureyev’s cinematic imagination.  If Renavand “owned” the stage, it was also because she was perfectly in synch with a carefree and confident Florian Magnenet, so in the moment that he managed to make you forget those horrible gold lamé pants.

 

Swan Lake, Act 1

Gently furling his ductile fingers in order to clasp the wrists of the rare bird that continued to astonish him, Audric Bezard also (once again) demonstrated that partnering can be so much more than “just stand around and be ready to lift the ballerina into position, OK?” Here we had what a pas is supposed to be about: a dialogue so intense that it transcends metaphor.

You always feel the synergy between Bezard and Amandine Albisson. Twice she threw herself into the overhead lift that resembles a back-flip caught mid-flight. Bezard knows that this partner never “strikes a pose” but instead fills out the legato, always continuing to extend some part her movements beyond the last drop of a phrase. His choice to keep her in movement up there, her front leg dangerously tilting further and further over by miniscule degrees, transformed this lift – too often a “hoist and hold” more suited to pairs skating – into a poetic and sincere image of utter abandon and trust. The audience held its breath for the right reason.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

Manfred

Bewildered, the audience nevertheless applauded wildly at the end of this agonized and out of context solo. Pretending to themselves they had understood, the audience just went with the flow of the seasoned dancer-actor. Mathias Heymann gave the moment its full dose of “ah me” angst and defied the limits of the little apron stage [these are people used to eating up space the size of a football field].

Pas de deux can mostly easily be pulled out of context and presented as is, since the theme generally gravitates from “we two are now falling in love,” and “yes, we are still in love,” to “hey, guys, welcome to our wedding!” But I have doubts about the point of plunging both actor and audience into an excerpt that lacks a shared back-story. Maybe you could ask Juliet to do the death scene a capella. Who doesn’t know the “why” of that one? But have most of us ever actually read Lord Byron, much less ever heard of this Manfred? The program notes that the hero is about to be reunited by Death [spelled with a capital “D”] with his beloved Astarté. Good to know.

Don Q

Francesco Mura somehow manages to bounce and spring from a tiny unforced plié, as if he just changed his mind about where to go. But sometimes the small preparation serves him less well. Valentine Colasante is now in a happy and confident mind-set, having learned to trust her body. She now relaxes into all the curves with unforced charm and easy wit.

R & J versus Sleeping Beauty’s Act III

In the Balcony Scene with Miriam Ould-Braham, Germain Louvet’s still boyish persona perfectly suited his Juliet’s relaxed and radiant girlishness. But then, when confronted by Léonore Baulac’s  Beauty, Louvet once again began to seem too young and coltish. It must hard make a connection with a ballerina who persists in exteriorizing, in offering up sharply-outlined girliness. You can grin hard, or you can simply smile.  Nothing is at all wrong with Baulac’s steely technique. If she could just trust herself enough to let a little bit of the air out of her tires…She drives fast but never stops to take a look at the landscape.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

As the Beatles once sang a very, very, long time ago:

 « Baby, you can drive my car
Yes, I’m gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I’ll love you »

Evening Two: “Etoiles.”  Tuesday, October 13, 2020.

We were enticed back to the Palais Garnier for a thing called “Etoiles {Stars] de l’Opera,” where the program consisted of…anything and everything in a very random way.  (Plus a bit of live music!)

Clair de lune by Alistair Marriott (2017) was announced in the program as a nice new thing. Nice live Debussy happened, because the house pianist Elena Bonnay, just like the best of dancers, makes all music fill out an otherwise empty space.

Mathieu Ganio, sporting a very pretty maxi-skort, opened his arms sculpturally, did a few perfect plies à la seconde, and proffered up a few light contractions. At the end, all I could think of was Greta Garbo’s reaction to her first kiss in the film Ninochka: “That was…restful.”  Therefore:

Trois Gnossiennes, by Hans van Manen and way back from 1982, seemed less dated by comparison.  The same plié à la seconde, a few innie contractions, a flexed foot timed to a piano chord for no reason whatever, again. Same old, eh? Oddly, though, van Manen’s pure and pensive duet suited  Ludmila Paglerio and Hugo Marchand as  prettily as Marriott’s had for Ganio. While Satie’s music breathes at the same spaced-out rhythm as Debussy’s, it remains more ticklish. Noodling around in an  absinth-colored but lucid haze, this oddball composer also knew where he was going. I thought of this restrained little pas de deux as perhaps “Balanchine’s Apollo checks out a fourth muse.”  Euterpe would be my choice. But why not Urania?

And why wasn’t a bit of Kylian included in this program? After all, Kylain has historically been vastly more represented in the Paris Opera Ballet’s repertoire than van Manen will ever be.

The last time I saw Martha Graham’s Lamentation, Miriam Kamionka — parked into a side corridor of the Palais Garnier — was really doing it deep and then doing it over and over again unto exhaustion during  yet another one of those Boris Charmatz events. Before that stunt, maybe I had seen the solo performed here by Fanny Gaida during the ‘90’s. When Sae-Un Park, utterly lacking any connection to her solar plexus, had finished demonstrating how hard it is to pull just one tissue out of a Kleenex box while pretending it matters, the audience around me couldn’t even tell when it was over and waited politely for the lights to go off  and hence applaud. This took 3.5 minutes from start to end, according to the program.

Then came the duet from William Forsythe’s Herman Schmerman, another thingy that maybe also had entered into the repertoire around 2017. Again: why this one, when so many juicy Forsythes already belong to us in Paris? At first I did not remember that this particular Forsythe invention was in fact a delicious parody of “Agon.” It took time for Hannah O’Neill to get revved up and to finally start pushing back against Vincent Chaillet. Ah, Vincent Chaillet, forceful, weightier, and much more cheerfully nasty and all-out than I’d seen him for quite a while, relaxed into every combination with wry humor and real groundedness. He kept teasing O’Neill: who is leading, eh? Eh?! Yo! Yow! Get on up, girl!

I think that for many of us, the brilliant Ida Nevasayneva of the Trocks (or another Trock! Peace be with you, gals) kinda killed being ever to watch La Mort du cygne/Dying Swan without desperately wanting to giggle at even the idea of a costume decked with feathers or that inevitable flappy arm stuff. Despite my firm desire to resist, Ludmila Pagliero’s soft, distilled, un-hysterical and deeply dignified interpretation reconciled me to this usually overcooked solo.  No gymnastic rippling arms à la Plisetskaya, no tedious Russian soul à la Ulanova.  Here we finally saw a really quietly sad, therefore gut-wrenching, Lamentation. Pagliero’s approach helped me understand just how carefully Michael Fokine had listened to our human need for the aching sound of a cello [Ophélie Gaillard, yes!] or a viola, or a harp  — a penchant that Saint-Saens had shared with Tchaikovsky. How perfectly – if done simply and wisely by just trusting the steps and the Petipa vibe, as Pagliero did – this mini-epic could offer a much less bombastic ending to Swan Lake.

Suite of Dances brought Ophélie Gaillard’s cello back up downstage for a face to face with Hugo Marchand in one of those “just you and me and the music” escapades that Jerome Robbins had imagined a long time before a “platform” meant anything less than a stage’s wooden floor.  I admit I had preferred the mysterious longing Mathias Heymann had brought to the solo back in 2018 — especially to the largo movement. Tonight, this honestly jolly interpretation, infused with a burst of “why not?” energy, pulled me into Marchand’s space and mindset. Here was a guy up there on stage daring to tease you, me, and oh yes the cellist with equally wry amusement, just as Baryshnikov once had dared.  All those little jaunty summersaults turn out to look even cuter and sillier on a tall guy. The cocky Fancy Free sailor struts in part four were tossed off in just the right way: I am and am so not your alpha male, but if you believe anything I’m sayin’, we’re good to go.

The evening wound down with a homeopathic dose of Romantic frou-frou, as we were forced to watch one of those “We are so in love. Yes, we are still in love” out of context pas de deux, This one was extracted from John Neumeier’s La Dame aux Camélias.

An ardent Mathieu Ganio found himself facing a Laura Hecquet devoted to smoothing down her fluffy costume and stiff hair. When Neumeier’s pas was going all horizontal and swoony, Ganio gamely kept replacing her gently onto her pointes as if she deserved valet parking.  But unlike, say, Anna Karina leaning dangerously out of her car to kiss Belmondo full throttle in Pierrot le Fou, Hecquet simply refused to hoist herself even one millimeter out of her seat for the really big lifts. She was dead weight, and I wanted to scream. Unlike almost any dancer I have ever seen, Hecquet still persists in not helping her co-driver. She insists on being hoisted and hauled around like a barrel. Partnering should never be about driving the wrong way down a one-way street.

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

John Kriza, creator of the « romantic guy » in Fancy Free in 1944. Press photo.

Paris, Palais Garnier, November 6 and 13, 2018

FANCY FREE

Would the “too elegant dancers of Paris” – as American critics decry them – be able to “get down” and frolic their way through the so ‘merican Fancy Free? Would they know how to chew gum like da guys and play like wise-asses? Just who should be blamed for the cost of leasing this genre ballet from the Robbins Trust? If Robbins, who had delighted in staging so many of his ballets on the Paris company, had left this one to other companies for all these years…did he have a good reason?

On November 6th, the dancing, the acting, was not even “too elegant.” Everyone danced small. The ensemble’s focus was so low key that the ballet became lugubrious, weightless, charmless, an accumulation of pre-fab schtick. I have never paid more attention to what the steps are called, never spent the span of Fancy Free analyzing the phrases (oh yeah, this one ends with more double tours to the right) and groaning inwardly at all the “business.” First chewing gum scene? Invisible. Chomp the gum, guys! For the reprise, please don’t make it so ridiculously obvious that another three sticks were also hidden behind the lamppost by the stagehands. I have never said to myself: aha, let’s repeat “now we put our arms around each others’ shoulders and try hard to look like pals while not getting armpit sweat on each others’ costumes.” Never been so bored by unvaryingly slow double pirouettes and by the fake beers being so sloppily lifted that they clearly looked fake. The bar brawl? Lethargic and well nigh invisible (and I was in a place with good visibility).

Then the women. That scene where the girl with the red purse gets teased – an oddly wooden Alice Renavand — utterly lacked sass and became rather creepy and belligerent. As the dream girl in purple, Eleonora Abbagnato wafted a perfume of stiff poise. Ms. Purple proved inappropriately condescending and un-pliant: “I will now demonstrate the steps while wearing the costume of the second girl.“ She acted like a mildly amused tourist stuck in some random country. Karl Paquette had already been stranded by his male partners before he even tried to hit on this female: an over-interiorized Stéphane Bullion (who would nevertheless manage to hint at tiny little twinkles of humor in his tightly-wound rumba) and a François Alu emphatically devoted to defending his space. Face to face with the glacial Abbagnato, Paquette even gave up trying to make their duet sexy. This usually bright and alive dancing guy resigned himself to trying to salvage a limp turn around the floor by two very boring white people.

Then Aurelia Bellet sauntered in as the third girl –clearly amused that her wig was possessed by a character all on its own – and owned the joint. This girl would know how to snap her gum. I wanted the ballet to begin afresh.

A week later, on the 13th, the troops came ashore. Alessio Carbone (as the sailor who practically wants to split his pants in half), Paul Marque (really interesting as the dreamer: beautiful pliés anchored a legato unspooling of never predictable movement), and Alexandre Gasse (as a gleeful and carefree rumba guy) hit those buddy poses without leaving room for gusts of air to pass between them. Bounce and energy and humor came back into the streets of New York when they just tossed off those very tight Popeye flexes as little jokes, not poses, which is what they are supposed to be. The tap dancing riffs came off as natural, and you could practically hear them sayin’ “I wanna beer, I wanna girl.” Valentine Colasante radiated cool amusement and the infinite ways she reacted to every challenge in the “hand-off the big red purse” sequence established her alpha womanly dominance. Because of her subtle and reactive acting, there was not a creep in sight. Dorothée Gilbert, as the dame in purple, held on to the dreamy sweetness of the ballerina she’d already given in Robbins’s The Concert some years ago, and then took it forward. During the duet, she seemed to lead Marque, as acutely in tune with how to control a man’s reactions, as Colasante had just a few moments before. Sitting at the little table, watching the men peacock around, Gilbert’s body and face remained vivid and alive.

A SUITE OF DANCES

Sonia Wieder-Atherton concentrated deeply on her score and on her cello, emitting lovely sounds and offering a challenge to the dancing soloists. They were not going to get any of the kind of gimlet eye contact a Ma or a Rostropovich – or a rehearsal pianist – might have provided. On November 6th Matthias Heymann and on November 13th Hugo Marchand reacted to this absent but vibrating onstage presence in their own distinctive ways.

Heymann infused the falsely improvised aspect of the choreography with a sense of reminiscence. Sitting on the ground upstage and leaning back to look at her at the outset, you could feel he’d already just danced the thing one way. And we’d never see it. He’d dance it now differently, maybe in a more diffused manner. And, as he settled downstage at her feet once again at the end, you imagined how he would continue on and on, always the gentleman caller. Deeply rooted movement had spiraled out in an unending flow of elegant and deep inspiration, in spite of the musician who had ignored him. Strangely, this gave the audience the sense of being allowed to peek through a half-open studio door. We were witnessing a brilliant dancer whose body will never stop if music is around. Robbins should have called this piece “Isadora,” for it embodies all the principles the mother of modern dance called for: spontaneous and joyous movement engendered by opening up your ears and soul to how the music sings within you.

Heymann’s body is a pliant rectangle; Marchand’s a broad-shouldered triangle. Both types, I should point out, would fit perfectly into Leonardo’s outline of the Vitruvian Man. Where your center of gravity lies makes you move differently. The art is in learning how to use what nature has given you. If these two had been born in another time and place, I could see Merce Cunningham latching on to Heymann’s purity of motion and Paul Taylor eyeing the catch-me-if-you-dare quality of Marchand.

Marchand’s Suite proved as playful, as in and out and around the music while seeking how to fill this big empty stage as Heymann’s had, but with a bit more of the sense of a seagull wooing his reluctant cellist hen. Marchand seemed more intent upon wooing us as well, whereas Heymann had kept his eye riven on his private muse.

Both made me listen to Bach as if the music had just been composed for them, afresh.

Ce diaporama nécessite JavaScript.

AFTERNOON OF A FAUN

It’s a hot sweaty day in a New York studio. A guy is stretching out all those ligaments, waiting for the next rehearsal or class. A freshly showered girl passes by the classroom door and pushes herself through that half-open studio door. Both – and this is such a dancer thing – are obsessed with how they look in the mirror…for better, for worse? When you are a young dancer, boy do you read into that studio mirror: who am I? Maybe I can like what I see? How can I make myself look better?

On the 6th, there was Marchand and here came Amandine Albisson. Albisson almost hissed “look at my shiny, shiny, new pointe shoes!” This may sound weird to say, but that little Joseph Cornell box of a set seemed too small for two such vibrant personas and for the potential of such shiny shoes. Both dancers aimed their movements out of and beyond that box in a never-ending flow of movement that kept catching the waves of Debussy’s sea of sound. The way that Marchand communicated that he could smell her fragrance. The way that fantastically taut and pliant horizontal lift seemed to surf. The way Albisson crisped up her fingers and wiggled them up through his almost embrace as if her arms were sails ready to catch the wind. The way he looked at her – “what, you don’t just exist in the mirror?” – right before he kissed her. It was a dream.

Unfortunately, Léonore Baulac and Germain Louvet do not necessarily a couple make, and the pair delivered a most awkward interpretation on the night of the 13th, complete with wobbly feet and wobbly hands in the partnering and the lifts were mostly so-so sort-of. Baulac danced dry and sharp and overemphatic – almost kicking her extensions – and Louvet just didn’t happen. Rapture and the way that time can stop when you are simply dancing for yourself, not for an audience quite yet, just didn’t happen either. I hope they were both just having an off night?

Afternoon of a Faun : Amandine Albisson et Hugo Marchand

GLASS PIECES

I had the same cast both nights, and I am furious. Who the hell told people – especially the atomic couples – to grin like sailors during the first movement? Believe me, if you smiled on New York’s streets back in 1983, you were either an idiot or a tourist.

But what really fuels my anger: the utter waste of Florian Magnenet in the central duet, dancing magnificently, and pushing his body as if his arms were thrusting through the thick hot humidity of Manhattan summer air. He reached out from deep down in his solar plexus and branched out his arms towards his partner as if to rescue her from an onrushing subway train and…Sae Eun Park placed her hand airlessly in the proper position, as she has for years now. Would some American company please whisk her out of here? She’s cookie-cutter efficient, but I’ll be damned if I would call her elegant. Elegance comes from a deep place. It’s thoughtful and weighty and imparts a rich sense of history and identity. It’s not about just hitting the marks. Elegance comes from the inside out. It cannot be faked from the outside in.

Commentaires fermés sur Robbins in Paris. Elegance : innate, mysterious, and sometimes out of place

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

Robbins à Paris : hommage passe et manque…

Je ne sais pas ce qu’il en est pour vous, mais moi, désormais, quand l’intitulé d’un spectacle du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris commence par le mot « Hommage », mon sixième sens commence à s’affoler. On en a trop vu, ces dernières années, d’hommages incomplets ou au rabais pour être tout à fait rassuré. J’aurais aimé que l’hommage à Jerome Robbins, qui aurait eu cent ans cette année, échappe à la fatale règle. Mais non. Cette fois-ci encore, on est face à une soirée « presque, mais pas ». La faute en est à l’idée saugrenue qui a conduit les décideurs à intégrer Fancy Free, le premier succès américain de Robbins, au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris. Car au risque de choquer l’esprit français, incorrigiblement universaliste, il faut reconnaitre qu’il y a des œuvres de valeur qui ne se transposent pas. Elles sont d’une sphère culturelle, parfois même d’une époque, sans être pour autant anecdotique ou datées. C’est le cas pour Fancy Free, ce moment dans la vie de marins de 1944, créé par un Robbins d’à peine 26 ans.

Lors d’une des premières présentations européennes, durant l’été 1946 à Londres, le critique Arnold Haskell notait

« Les [ballets] américains, Fancy Free, Interplay et On Stage, étaient dans un idiome familier aux fans de cinéma mais interprété si superbement par des danseurs de formation classique, qu’ils sont apparus comme quelque chose de nouveau. La vitalité de ces jeunes américains, leur beauté physique a tout emporté. Quelques-uns ont demandé « mais est-ce du ballet ? » […] Bien sûr c’est du ballet ; du ballet américain »

Car plus que la comédie musicale de Broadway (auquel Robbins, de concert avec Leonard Bernstein, ne se frottera en tant que créateur qu’avec On The Town), c’est au cinéma et à Fred Astaire que fait référence Fancy Free. La troisième variation de marin, cette rumba que Jerry Robbins créa pour lui-même, est une référence à peine déguisée à une scène de « You were Never Lovelier », un film de 1942 où le grand Fred partage l’affiche avec Rita Hayworth.

Et c’est sans doute ce qui fait que ce ballet n’est guère aujourd’hui encore appréhendable que par des danseurs américains pour qui le tap dancing est quelque chose d’intégré, quelque chose qu’ils ont très souvent rencontré dès l’école primaire à l’occasion d’un musical de fin d’année. L’esthétique militaire des années de guerre, -une période considérée comme tendue mais heureuse- de même que Fred Astaire ou Rita Hayworth font partie de l’imaginaire collectif américain.

Sur cette série parisienne, on a assisté à des quarts de succès ou à d’authentiques flops. La distribution de la première (vue le 6/11) est hélas plutôt caractérisée par le flop. Tout est faux. Le tap dancing n’est pas inné, les sautillés déséquilibrés sont précautionneux. Surtout, les interactions pantomimes entre les marins manquent totalement de naturel. Au bar, les trois compères portent par deux fois un toast. Messieurs Alu, Paquette et Bullion brandissent tellement violemment leurs pintes que, dans la vie réelle, ils auraient éclaboussé le plafond et n’auraient plus rien eu à boire dans leur bock. Lorsqu’ils se retournent vers le bar, leurs dos arrondis n’expriment rien. On ne sent pas l’alcool qui descend trop vite dans leur estomac. François Alu qui est pourtant le plus près du style et vend sa variation pyrotechnique avec son efficacité coutumière, était rentré dans le bar en remuant plutôt bien des épaules mais en oubliant de remuer du derrière. Karl Paquette manque de naïveté dans sa variation et Stéphane Bullion ne fait que marquer les chaloupés de sa rumba. Les filles sont encore moins dans le style. Là encore, ce sont les dos qui pèchent. Alice Renavand, fille au sac rouge le garde trop droit. Cela lui donne un air maussade pendant toute sa première entrée. La scène du vol du sac par les facétieux marins prend alors une teinte presque glauque. Eleonora Abbagnato, dans son pas de deux avec Karl Paquette, est marmoréenne. Ses ronds de jambe au bras de son partenaire suivis d’un cambré n’entraînent pas le couple dans le mouvement. C’est finalement la fille en bleu (Aurélia Bellet), une apparition tardive, qui retient l’attention et fait sourire.

La seconde distribution réunissant Alessio Carbone, Paul Marque et Alexandre Gasse (vue le 9/11) tire son épingle du jeu. L’énergie des pirouettes et l’interprétation de détail peuvent laisser à désirer (Paris n’est pas le spécialiste du lancer de papier chewing-gum) mais le rapport entre les trois matelots est plus naturel. Surtout, les filles sont plus crédibles. Valentine Colasante, fille au sac rouge, fait savoir très clairement qu’elle goûte les trois marins en goguette ; la scène du vol du sac redevient un charmant badinage. Dorothée Gilbert évoquerait plus la petite femme de Paris qu’une new-yorkaise mais son duo avec Paul Marque dégage ce qu’il faut de sensualité. On ne peut néanmoins s’empêcher de penser qu’il est bizarre, pour ce ballet, de focaliser plus sur les filles que sur les trois garçons.

Voilà une addition au répertoire bien dispensable. Le ballet, qui est en son genre un incontestable chef-d’œuvre mais qui paraît au mieux ici une aimable vieillerie, ne pouvait servir les danseurs. Et c’est pourtant ce que devrait faire toute œuvre rentrant au répertoire. Transposer Fancy Free à Paris, c’était nécessairement condamner les danseurs français à l’imitation et conduire à des comparaisons désavantageuses. Imaginerait-on Carmen de Roland Petit rentrer au répertoire du New York City Ballet ? S’il fallait absolument une entrée au répertoire, peut-être aurait-il fallu se demander quels types d’œuvres le chorégraphe lui-même décidait-il de donner à la compagnie de son vivant : des ballets qui s’enrichiraient d’une certaine manière de leur confrontation avec le style français et qui enrichiraient en retour les interprètes parisiens. Et s’il fallait un ballet « Broadway » au répertoire du ballet de l’Opéra de Paris, pourquoi ne pas avoir choisi Interplay ? La scène en ombre chinoise du deuxième mouvement aurait été une jolie préfiguration du mouvement central de Glass Pieces et les danseurs maison auraient pu travailler la prestesse américaine et les accents jazzy sans grever le budget avec la fabrication de coûteux décors…

*

 *                                       *

La partie centrale du spectacle, séparée par un entracte, est constitué de deux valeurs sûres régulièrement présentée par le ballet de l’Opéra. A Suite of Dances, entré au répertoire après la mort du grand Jerry avec Manuel Legris comme interprète, est un riche vecteur pour de grands interprètes, beaucoup moins pour des danseurs moins inspirés. Dans ce dernier cas, le côté œuvre d’occasion créée sur les qualités de son créateur – Mikhaïl Baryshnikov – peut malheureusement ressortir. Cette regrettable éventualité nous aura fort heureusement été épargnée. Aussi bien Mathias Heymann qu’Hugo Marchand, qui gomment l’aspect cabotin de l’interprète original, ont quelque chose de personnel à faire passer dans leur dialogue avec la violoncelliste Sonia Wieder-Atherton. Heymann (le 6/11) est indéniablement élégant mais surtout absolument dionysiaque. Il y a quelque chose du Faune ou de l’animal dans la façon dont il caresse le sol avec ses pieds dans les petites cloches durant la première section. Son mouvement ne s’arrête que lorsque l’instrument a fini de sonner. Pendant le troisième mouvement, réflexif, il semble humer la musique et on peut littéralement la voir s’infuser dans le corps de l’animal dansant que devient Mathias Heymann.  L’instrumentiste, presque trop concentrée sur son violoncelle ne répond peut-être pas assez aux appels pleins de charme du danseur. Avec Hugo Marchand, on est dans un tout autre registre. Élégiaque dans le mouvement lent, mais plein de verve (magnifié par une batterie cristalline) sur le 2e mouvement rapide, Hugo Marchand reste avant tout un danseur. Il interrompt une série de facéties chorégraphiques par un très beau piqué arabesque agrémenté d’un noble port de bras. À l’inverse d’Heymann, son mouvement s’arrête mais cela n’a rien de statique. L’interprète semble suspendu à l’écoute de la musique. Cette approche va mieux à Sonia Wieder-Atherton. On se retrouve face à deux instrumentistes qui confrontent leur art et testent les limites de leur instrument respectif.

 *                               *

Dans Afternoon of a Faun, le jeune danseur étoile avait été moins à l’unisson de sa partenaire (le 6). Hugo Marchand dansait la subtile relecture du Faune de Nijinsky aux côtés d’Amandine Albisson. Les deux danseurs montrent pourtant de fort belles choses. Lui, est admirable d’intériorité durant toute la première section, absorbé dans un profond exercice de proprioception. Amandine Albisson est ce qu’il faut belle et mystérieuse. Ses développés à la barre sont d’une indéniable perfection formelle. Mais les deux danseurs semblent hésiter sur l’histoire qu’ils veulent raconter. Ils reviennent trop souvent, comme à rebours, vers le miroir et restent tous deux sur le même plan. Ni l’un ni l’autre ne prend la main, et ne transmue donc la répétition de danse en une entreprise de séduction. L’impression est toute autre pendant la soirée du 9 novembre. Audric Bezard, à la beauté plastique époustouflante, est narcissique à souhait devant le miroir. Il ajuste sa ceinture avec un contentement visible. Lorsque Myriam Ould-Braham entre dans le studio , il est évident qu’il veut la séduire et qu’il pense réussir sans peine. Mais, apparemment absente, la danseuse s’impose en maîtresse du jeu. On voit au fur et à mesure le jeune danseur se mettre au diapason du lyrisme de sa partenaire. Le baiser final n’est pas tant un charme rompu qu’une sorte de sort jeté. Myriam Ould-Braham devient presque brumeuse. Elle disparaît plutôt qu’elle ne sort du studio. Le danseur aurait-il rêvé sa partenaire idéale?

*

 *                                       *

Le ballet qui clôturait l’Hommage 2018 à Jerome Robbins avait sans doute pour certains balletomanes l’attrait de la nouveauté. Glass Pieces n’avait pas été donné depuis la saison 2004-2005, où il était revenu d’ailleurs après dix ans d’éclipse. En cela, le ballet de Robbins est emblématique de la façon dont le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris traite – ou maltraite plutôt – son répertoire. Entré en novembre 1991, il avait été repris, du vivant de Robbins, en 1994 puis en 1995. Pour tout dire, on attendait plutôt un autre retour, celui de The Four Seasons, le dernier cadeau de Robbins au ballet de l’Opéra en 1996. Cette œuvre, dont les soli féminins sont constamment présentés par les artistes du corps de ballet lors du concours de promotion, aurait eu l’avantage d’utiliser dans un idiome plus classique le corps de ballet et aurait permis de multiples possibilités de distribution solistes et demi-solistes. Il n’en a pas été décidé ainsi. Glass Pieces, qui est en son genre un chef-d’œuvre avec son utilisation quasi graphique des danseurs évoluant sur fond de quadrillage tantôt comme des clusters, tantôt comme une délicate frise antique ou enfin tels des volutes tribales, n’a pas été nécessairement bien servi cette saison. Durant le premier mouvement, on se demande qui a bien pu dire aux trois couples de demi-solistes de sourire comme s’ils étaient des ados pré-pubères invités à une fête d’anniversaire. Plus grave encore, le mouvement central a été, les deux soirs où j’ai vu le programme, dévolu à Sae Eun Park. La danseuse, aux côtés de Florent Magnenet, ravale la chorégraphie « statuaire » de Robbins, où les quelques instants d’immobilité doivent avoir autant de valeur que les sections de danse pure, à une succession de minauderies néoclassiques sans signification. Les deux premières incarnations du rôle, Marie-Claude Pietragalla et Elisabeth Platel, vous faisaient passer une après-midi au Met Museum. L’une, accompagnée de Kader Belarbi, avait l’angularité d’un bas relief égyptien, l’autre, aux bras de Wilfried Romoli, évoquait les parois d’un temple assyrien sur laquelle serait sculptée une chasse aux lions. Comme tout cela semble loin…

La prochaine fois que la direction du ballet de l’Opéra voudra saluer un grand chorégraphe disparu qui a compté dans son Histoire, je lui conseille de troquer le mot « hommage » pour celui de « célébration ». En mettant la barre plus haut, elle parviendra, peut être, à se hisser à la hauteur d’une part de l’artiste qu’elle prétend honorer et d’autre part à de la belle et riche génération de jeunes danseurs dont elle est dotée aujourd’hui.

Interplay. 1946. Photographie Baron. Haskell écrivait : « C’est une interprétation dansée de la musique, un remarquable chef d’oeuvre d’artisanat où le classicisme rencontre l’idiome moderne, nous procurant de la beauté, de l’esprit, de la satire, de l’humour et une pincée de vulgarité ».

 

3 Commentaires

Classé dans Hier pour aujourd'hui, Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique

Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, un hommage panoramique

Jerome Robbins. photography © Paul Kolnik. Courtesy of Les Etés de la Danse.

Les Etés de la Danse. Hommage à Jerome Robbins, programme 1. New York City Ballet et Joffrey Ballet. Lundi 25 juin 2018 à la Seine musicale.

Voilà déjà la quatorzième édition des étés de la danse ! Cette année, le festival est encore délocalisé à la Seine musicale, une salle difficilement accessible. À la sortie du métropolitain, à l’extrême bout ouest de la ligne 9, le gros œuf en proue de l’Île Seguin semble tout proche. Il vous faut pourtant contourner tout un pâté d’immeubles et une passerelle par-dessus le fleuve pour enfin arriver au théâtre. La salle elle-même n’est pas spécialement adaptée à la danse. Depuis les places de balcon, la scène ressemble à une petite boîte dans une boîte. On se console en se disant qu’on s’est rendu ici pour assister à un programme américain et qu’à New York, on ne verrait guère mieux du haut du Fourth Ring de l’ex-State Theater ou encore du Met.

Au vu des nombreuses promotions qui ont couru sur internet, la feuille de location est un peu tristounette. C’est injuste. En dépit de l’éloignement de la salle et d’affiches publicitaires particulièrement moches (Les Étés de la Danse nous avaient habitués à beaucoup mieux), la programmation du festival est vraiment alléchante. Elle combine cette année un hommage à Jerome Robbins, qui aurait eu cent ans cette année, et la venue de pas moins de cinq compagnies connues ou moins connues du public parisien.

Le programme 1, qui réunissait le New York City Ballet et la Joffrey Ballet est de surcroît fort bien construit. Il rassemble en un panorama très complet cinq décennies de création du grand Jerry, alternativement Ballet man et Broadway man. La présentation -non chronologique- des pièces offrait une bonne respiration au public : d’abord invité à une heure suspendue sur la musique de Chopin (Dances at a Gathering, la décennie des 70), puis, après l’entracte, titillé par les accents jazzy de Morton Gould (Interplay, la décennie des années 50-60, où le chorégraphe se partage entre la création d’un répertoire de ballets américains et les musicals) avant de retourner à Bach (Suite of Dances, créé à l’orée des années 90 pour un Mikhaïl Baryshnikov en quête d’un renouveau de son répertoire). La soirée se terminait par le très roboratif Glass Pieces, réflexion du chorégraphe vieillissant sur les possibilités expressives de la danse classique sur des partitions d’abord utilisées par des chorégraphes contemporains (le ballet de 1983 intervient après la célèbre production d’Einstein on the Beach, l’opéra dansé du compositeur).

*

 *                                                                              *

L’interprétation de ces pièces par les deux compagnies invitées réserve son lot de découvertes, de bonnes surprises, mais aussi de déceptions.

«Dances At A Gathering» a été créé pour le New York City Ballet en 1969. Il est entré au répertoire de l’Opéra de Paris en 1991 dans une version légèrement altérée par le chorégraphe. Dans la version d’origine la danseuse en mauve, qui n’apparaît qu’après le premier tiers du ballet à Paris, danse le pas de deux avec le danseur vert dévolu à la danseuse en jaune à Paris (abricot à New York). Cette simple translation de pas change l’alchimie entre les danseurs : le couple mauve-vert semble plus fixe que dans la version parisienne où le garçon semble plus volage et où les possibilités d’intrigues entre les protagonistes de cette assemblée d’un après-midi d’été sont plus nombreuses.

C’est hélas Sara Mearns qui occupe le rôle « augmenté » de la danseuse mauve. L’interprète semble avoir un statut tout à fait privilégié dans sa compagnie d’origine. Les photographies fournies par le New York City Ballet pour Dances At A Gathering vous la proposent sur tous les clichés, en danseuse mauve mais aussi en abricot… Est-ce pour cela que son interprétation des pas de la ballerine parme apparaît si interchangeable ? Gros chignon, pieds particulièrement bruyants sur la première entrée, bras et jambes qui font flip flap dans toutes les directions autour d’un buste d’airain, elle n’apporte aucune psychologie à son personnage ni aucune interaction autre que physique avec ses partenaires.

Tiler Peck, en rose, ne convainc guère plus en dépit de qualités plus immédiatement discernables. Sa danse est efficace et son phrasé parfois intéressant. Mais il manque à son personnage cette évanescence de pétale frais qu’on attend de ce rôle. Du coup, les passages dramatiques semblent être sur le même plan que les interactions romantiques. Le dernier pas de deux avec le danseur violet – l’élégant et véloce Tyler Angle, excellent partenaire – manque de sentiment élégiaque et, par ricochet, de drame.

Avec deux trous pareils dans la distribution (et le danseur vert de Chase Finlay, tolérable mais fade), on n’échappe pas à quelques longueurs. Néanmoins, on goûte le duo du danseur en brique (Joseph Gordon) avec la danseuse en abricot (Lauren Lovette) : un moment de danse pizzicati sans le traditionnel staccato trop souvent observé aujourd’hui au New York City Ballet. Elle a de très jolis bras et une vitesse qui ne verse jamais dans la précipitation. Lui déploie une prestesse qui n’est pas exempte de moelleux. Maria Kowroski, en vert amande, liane élégante, danse délicieusement entre les tempi : c’est tout chic et charme. Il me manquera certes toujours les moulinets de poignets de Claude de Vulpian à la fin du badinage avec les danseurs violet, vert et brique mais la ballerine s’en sort avec les honneurs. La salle rit.

Et puis il y a la présence solaire de Joaquin De Luz dans le danseur en brun, aux antipodes de l’interprétation parisienne du rôle. Ici, pas de poète en recherche de muse. Concentré d’énergie explosive, il évoque immanquablement Edward Vilella, créateur du rôle. Petit gabarit (parfois même un peu trop pour ses partenaires féminines : on regrette l’absence de Megan Fairchild avec laquelle il s’accorde si bien), il joue la mouche du coche dans son savoureux duo de rivalité avec Tyler Angle. Sa variation finale est proprement jubilatoire. Soignant à l’extrême les pliés de réception de sauts, il met du coup en valeur l’envol et prend le temps de montrer les directions par des épaulements exaltés mais précis. Rien que pour lui, on ne regrette pas le périple qui nous a conduit sur l’île Seguin.

NewYorkCityBallet-Dances At A Gathering02-Photo © Paul Kolnik

« Interplay », est le ballet idéal pour approcher Jerome Robbins, « the broadway man ». Conçu pour des danseurs classiques en 1945, il utilise la technique académique avec de petits twists sans pour autant verser dans la couleur locale de « Fancy Free » ou nécessiter que les danseurs sachent chanter comme dans « West Side Story Suite » : pieds ancrés dans le sol et marches en crabe mais pyrotechnie à tout va caractérisent la pièce. Les garçons font même des roulades soleil pour épater les filles dans le quatrième mouvement. On se prend à s’étonner que les danseurs portent chaussons et pointes quand on les imaginait porter des baskets. La musique de Morton Gould, tour à tour rythmique et primesautière, ferait bondir un mort de sa bière.

Le Joffrey Ballet, peu connu chez nous, déploie la bonne énergie dans cette pièce rarement montrée à Paris. Les quatre garçons retiennent particulièrement l’attention. Le premier mouvement est mené avec beaucoup d’énergie par Elivelton Tomazi (en vert). Yoshihisa Arai (en rouge) incendie le deuxième mouvement de sa belle ligne, de sa grande élévation et de ses petits frappés de mains presque baroques. Pendant le Pas de deux, le reste de la distribution prend des poses sensuelles en ombre chinoise. Une sensualité qui manque un peu au pas de deux lui-même. Le danseur en bleu, Alberto Velasquez déploie ce qu’il faut de mâle assurance mais sa partenaire en rose, Christine Rocas, semble un peu étrangère a l’action.

« Suite of Dances », sur des pièces pour violoncelle de Bach, qui succède à Interplay, en est finalement moins éloigné qu’on serait tenté de le penser de prime abord. On retrouve ce génie de Robbins pour la greffe de détails extérieurs à la tradition académique qui lui donnent une nouvelle vitalité. Ici, il ne s’agit pas de mouvements empruntés au jazz (Interplay) ou aux danses nationales polonaises (Dances) mais des tics de cabotinage d’un grand danseur (marche avec les hanches en-avant, petits tours jambes repliées, jeu sur les pertes de direction, etc…). Cette partition, taillée sur mesure pour Baryshnikov a néanmoins continué d’être interprété quand son créateur n’a lui-même plus été en mesure de l’interpréter. Anthony Huxley, nouvelle incarnation du danseur au pyjama rouge, est moelleux, musical et élégant. Il installe un dialogue avec sa partenaire instrumentiste. Mais il lui manque le fond de cabotinage qui met en valeur les incongruités de la chorégraphie. On assiste à un récital de – belles – danses savantes sans jamais vraiment atteindre un quelconque Nirvana. On aurait aimé voir Anthony Huxley dans le danseur en brique ou en brun de Dances at a Gathering. Et que d’inventions comiques aurait apporté Joaquim de Luz dans « Suite »… C’était hélas pour la seconde distribution…

Pour « Glass Pieces » qui concluait la soirée, on dresse le même constat que pour Interplay. Au Joffrey, les garçons sont globalement plus palpitants que les filles. Le premier mouvement sur le quadrillage en cyclo de fond a un côté plus humain et moins graphique qu’à Paris. Pourquoi pas : l’effet est moins cluster d’écran vidéo et plus piétons des rues. Dans le deuxième mouvement avec sa frise de filles en ombre chinoise (Robbins savait renouveler des effets qu’il avait déjà utilisés ailleurs), Miguel Angel Bianco est ce qu’il faut de sculptural pour figurer un haut relief de chair, mais aucune sensualité ne se dégage de son duo avec sa partenaire Jeraldine Mendoza. Pour le final, l’entrée des garçons est galvanisante. Il s’en dégage une énergique presque tribale. Mais ça s’essouffle avec l’entrée des filles en guirlande sur le thème de flûte. Dommage…

GlassPieces-JoffreyBallet-CompanyDancers–Photo © Cheryl Mann

Mais ne boudons néanmoins pas notre plaisir. Ce n’est pas souvent qu’à Paris, on assiste à un hommage aussi bien construit et complet.

[Le programme 2 de l’hommage à Robbins joue du jeudi 28 au samedi 30 juin à la Seine Musicale]

Commentaires fermés sur Etés de la Danse 2018 : Robbins, un hommage panoramique

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), Ici Paris