Archives de Tag: In G major

En Sol/In G Major: Robbins’s inspired and limpid adagio goes perfect at the Paris Opera.

Gérald and Sarah Murphy, East Hampton 1915.

Two nights at the opera, or were they on the Riviera?

May 20th, 2017.

Myriam Ould-Braham, who owned her chipper loose run –the feet didn’t drag behind her, they traced tiny semi-circles in the sand, and the hips swayed less than Marilyn but more than yours should — called all of us (onstage and in the audience) to attention during the first movement. She was that girl in high school so beautiful but so damned sweet that you couldn’t bring yourself to hate her. Mathias Heymann was the guy so gorgeous and popular in theory that no one ever dared try to get close to him, so he ended up being kind of lonely. Both cast a spell. But you sensed that while She was utterly a self, He yearned for that something more: a kindred spirit.

The second movement went off like a gunshot. Ould-Braham popped out of the wings upstage and stared — her body both still and expectant, both open and closed – at Heymann. From house left, Heymann’s back gave my eyes the illusion of his being both arrow-straight and deeply Graham contracted, hit. You know that feeling: “at last we are alone…uh oh, oh man oh man, am I up to it?”

Like two panthers released from the cage that only a crowd at a party can create, they paced about and slinked around each other. At first as formal and poised as expensive porcelain figurines, they so quickly melted and melded: as if transported by the music into the safety of a potter’s warm hand. Even when the eyes of Ould-Braham and Heymann were not locked, you could feel that this couple even breathed in synch. During the sequence of bourrées where she slips upstage, blindly and backwards towards her parner, each time Ould-Braham nuanced these tiny fussy steps. Her hands grew looser and freer – they surrendered themselves. What better metaphor does there exist for giving in to love?

Look down at your hands. Are they clenched, curled, extended, flat…or are they simply resting on your lover’s arm?

May 23rd

During the first and third movements of the 20th, the corps shaped the easy joy of just a bunch of pals playing around. On the 23rd that I was watching two sharp teams who wanted to win. I even thought about beach volleyball, for the first time in decades, for god’s sake.

Here the energy turned itself around and proved equally satisfying. Amadine Albisson is womanly in a very different way. She’s taller, her center of gravity inevitably less quicksilver than Ould-Braham’s, but her fluid movements no less graceful. Her interpretation proved more reserved, less flirtatious, a bit tomboyish. Leading the pack of boys, her dance made you sense that she subdues those of the male persuasion by not only by knowing the stats of every pitcher in Yankee history but also by being able to slide into home better than most of them. All the while, she radiates being clearly happy to have been born a girl.

As the main boy, Josua Hoffalt’s élan concentrated on letting us in on to all of those little bits of movement Robbins liked to lift from real life: during the slow-motion swim and surf section – and the “Simon says” parts — every detail rang clear and true. When Hoffalt took a deep sniff of dusty stage air I swear I, too, felt I could smell a whiff of the  sand and sea as it only does on the Long Island shore.

Then everyone runs off to go get ice cream, and the adagio begins. Stranded onstage, he turns around, and, whoops, um, uh oh: there She is. Albisson’s expression was quizzical, her attitude held back. In Hoffalt’s case, his back seemed to bristle. The pas de deux started out a bit cold. At first their bodies seemed to back away from each other even when up close, as if testing the other. Wasn’t very romantic. Suddenly their approach to the steps made all kind of sense. “Last summer, we slept together once, and then you never called.” “Oh, now I remember! I never called. What was I thinking? You’re so gorgeous and cool now, how could I have forgotten all about you?”

Both wrestled with their pride, and questioned the other throughout each combination. They were performing to each other. But then Albisson began to progressively thaw to Hoffalt’s attentions and slowly began to unleash the deep warmth of her lower back and neck as only she can do. Her pliancy increased by degrees until at the end it had evolved into a fully sensual swan queen melt of surrender.

She won us both over.

A tiny and fleeting gesture sets off the final full-penchée overhead lift that carries her backwards off-stage in splendor. All that she must do is gently touch his forehead before she plants both hands on his shoulders and pushes up. It can be done as lightly as if brushing away a wisp of hair or as solemnly as a benediction, but neither is something you could never have imagined Albisson’s character even thinking of doing at the start of this duet. Here that small gesture, suffused with awe at the potential of tenderness, turned out to be as thrilling as the lift itself.

Both casts evoked the spirit of a passage in the gorgeous English of the Saint James’s translation of the Bible: If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea; Even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right hand shall hold me. (Psalm 139). I dare to say that’s also one way to define partnering in general, when it really works.

Commentaires fermés sur En Sol/In G Major: Robbins’s inspired and limpid adagio goes perfect at the Paris Opera.

Classé dans Retours de la Grande boutique

En deux programmes : l’adieu à Benji

Programme Cunningham / Forsythe. Soirées du 26 avril et du 9 mai.

Programme Balanchine / Robbins / Cherkaoui-Jaletoirée du 2 mai.

Le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris poursuit et achève avec deux programmes simultanés sa saison Millepied sous direction Dupont : la soirée De Keersmacker (à qui on fait décidément beaucoup trop d’honneur) est un plan « B » après l’annulation d’une création du directeur démissionnaire et La Sylphide était une concession faite au répertoire maison.

*

*                                                             *

Avec le programme Balanchine-Robbins-Cherkaoui/Jalet, c’est Benji-New York City Ballet qui s’exprime. Les soirées unifiées par le choix d’un compositeur  – ici, Maurice Ravel – mais illustrée par des chorégraphes différents sont monnaie courante depuis l’époque de Balanchine dans cette compagnie.

C’est ainsi. Les anciens danseurs devenus directeurs apportent souvent avec eux les formules ou le répertoire qui était celui de leur carrière active. Cela peut avoir son intérêt quand ce répertoire est choisi avec discernement. Malheureusement, Benjamin Millepied en manque un peu quand il s’agit de Balanchine.

La Valse en ouverture de soirée, est un Balanchine de 1951 qui porte le lourd et capiteux parfum de son époque. C’est une œuvre très « Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo » avec décors symbolistes (une salle de bal fantomatique), costumes précieux (gants blancs pour tout le monde) et sous-texte onirique. Des duos solistes incarnent tour à tour différents stades de la vie d’un couple (sur les Valses nobles et sentimentales de 1912), trois créatures échappées d’un magazine de papier glacé figurent les Parques et une jeune fille en blanc délaisse son partenaire pour succomber aux charmes d’un dandy qui n’est autre que la mort (La Valse, 1920).

Le soir de la première, la pièce est dansée de manière crémeuse par le ballet de l’Opéra (et non staccato comme l’a fait le New York City Ballet l’été dernier aux Étés de la Danse), les trois Parques (mesdemoiselles Gorse, Boucaud et Hasboun) ont de jolies mains et leurs évolutions sémaphoriques captent l’attention. On leur reprochera peut-être un petit manque d’abandon dionysiaque lorsqu’elles se jettent dans les bras de partenaires masculins. Les couples, qui préfigurent In the night de Robbins sont clairement reconnaissables – c’était au le cas lors de la visite du Miami City Ballet en 2011, mais pas dans l’interprétation du New York City Ballet en juillet dernier. Emmanuel Thibaut est charmant en amoureux juvénile aux côtés de Muriel Zusperreguy. Audric Bezard est l’amant mûr parfait aux côtés de Valentine Colasante qui déploie la bonne énergie. Hugo Marchand prête ses belles lignes au soliste aux prises avec les trois Parques. Sa partenaire, Hannah O’Neill, n’est pas nécessairement des plus à l’aise dans ce ballet. On s’en étonne.

Dans la soliste blanche aux prises avec la mort, Dorothée Gilbert délivre une interprétation correcte mais sans véritable engagement. Mathieu Ganio fait de même. C’est la mort de Florian Magnenet, élégante, violente et implacable à la fois, qui retient l’attention.

Mais très curieusement, même si la danse est fluide et élégante et qu’on ressent un certain plaisir à la vue des danseurs, on ne peut s’empêcher de penser que ce Balanchine qui semble plus préoccupé de narration que d’incarnation de la musique est bien peu …balanchinien. Si ce ballet portait le label « Lifar » ou « Petit », ne serait-il pas immédiatement et impitoyablement disqualifié comme vieillerie sans intérêt ?

La direction Millepied aura décidement été caractérisée par l’introduction ou la réintroduction au répertoire de pièces secondaires et dispensables du maître incontesté de la danse néoclassique.

En seconde partie de soirée, c’est finalement Robbins qui se montre plus balanchinien que son maître. En Sol est une incarnation dynamique du Concerto pour piano en sol de Ravel. Le texte chorégraphique épouse sans l’illustrer servilement la dualité de la partition de Ravel entre structure classique (Ravel disait « C’est un Concerto au plus strict sens du terme, écrit dans l’esprit de ceux de Mozart ») et rythmes syncopés du jazz pour la couleur locale. Les danseurs du corps de ballet prennent en main le côté ludique de la partition et les facéties de l’orchestre : ils sont tour à tour jeunesse de plage, meneurs de revue ou crabes prenant le soleil sur le sable. Ils sont menés dans le premier et le troisième mouvement par les deux solistes « académiques » qui s’encanaillent à l’instar du piano lui-même. Le classique revient dans toute sa pureté aussi bien dans la fosse d’orchestre que sur le plateau pour le deuxième mouvement. Le couple danse un pas de deux solaire et mélancolique à la fois sur les sinuosités plaintives du – presque – solo du piano. Jerome Robbins, homme de culture, cite tendrement ses deux univers (Broadway et la danse néo-classique) mais pas seulement. L’esthétique des costumes et décors d’Erté, très art-déco, sont une citation du Train Bleu de Nijinska-Milhaud-Cocteau de 1926, presque contemporain du Concerto. Mais là où Cocteau avait voulu du trivial et du consommable « un ballet de 1926 qui sera démodé en 1927 » (l’intérêt majeur du ballet était un décor cubiste d’Henri Laurens, artiste aujourd’hui assez oublié), Robbins-Ravel touchent au lyrisme et à l’intemporel.

En Sol a été très régulièrement repris par le Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris depuis son entrée au répertoire en 1975 (en même temps que La Valse). Les jeunes danseurs de la nouvelle génération se lancent avec un enthousiasme roboratif sur leur partition (Barbeau, Ibot, Madin et Marque se distinguent). C’est également le cas pour le couple central qui n’a peur de rien. Léonore Baulac a le mouvement délié particulièrement la taille et le cou (ma voisine me fait remarquer que les bras pourraient être plus libérés. Sous le charme, je dois avouer que je n’y ai vu que du feu). Elle a toute confiance en son partenaire, Germain Louvet, à la ligne classique claire et aux pirouettes immaculées.

Boléro de Jalet-Cherkaoui-Abramovitch, qui termine la soirée, reste aussi horripilant par son esthétique soignée que par son manque de tension. On est captivé au début par la mise en scène, entre neige télévisuelle du temps des chaines publiques et cercles hypnotiques des économiseurs d’écran. Mais très vite, les onze danseurs (dix plus une) lancés dans une transe de derviche-tourneur restent bloqués au même palier d’intensité. Leur démultiplication n’est pas le fait de l’habilité des chorégraphes mais du grand miroir suspendu obliquement à mi-hauteur de la scène. Les costumes de Riccardo Tisci d’après l’univers de Marina Abramovic, à force d’être jolis passent à côté de la danse macabre. Ils seront bientôt les témoins désuets d’une époque (les années 2010) qui mettait des têtes de mort partout (tee-shirts, bijoux et même boutons de portes de placard).

Rien ne vient offrir un équivalent à l’introduction progressive de la masse orchestrale sur le continuo mélodique. Que cherchaient à faire les auteurs de cette piécette chic ? À offrir une version en trois dimensions de la première scène « abstraite » de Fantasia de Walt Disney ? Le gros du public adore. C’est vrai, Boléro de Cherkaoui-Jalet-Abramovic est une pièce idéale pour ceux qui n’aiment pas la danse.

*

*                                                             *

Avec le programme Cunningham-Forsythe, le ballet de l’Opéra est accommodé à la sauce Benji-LA Dance Project. Paradoxalement, ce placage fonctionne mieux en tant que soirée. Les deux chorégraphes font partie intégrante de l’histoire de la maison et les pièces choisies, emblématiques, sont des additions de choix au répertoire.

Walkaround Time est une œuvre où l’ennui fait partie de la règle du jeu comme souvent chez Cunningham. Les décors de Jasper Johns d’après Marcel Duchamp ont un petit côté ballon en celluloïd. Ils semblent ne faire aucun sens et finissent pourtant par faire paysage à la dernière minute. La chorégraphie avec ses fentes en parallèle, ses triplettes prises de tous côtés, ses arabesques projetées sur des bustes à la roideur initiale de planche à repasser mais qui s’animent soudain par des tilts ou des arches, tend apparemment vers la géométrie et l’abstraction : une danseuse accomplit une giration en arabesque, entre promenade en dehors et petits temps levés par 8e de tour. Pourtant, il se crée subrepticement une alchimie entre ces danseurs qui ne se regardent pas et ne jouent pas de personnages. Des enroulements presque gymniques, des portés géométriques émane néanmoins une aura d’intimité humaine : Caroline Bance fait des développés 4e en dedans sur une très haute demi pointe et crée un instant de suspension spirituelle. La bande-son feutrée, déchirée seulement à la fin d’extraits de poèmes dada, crée un flottement sur lequel on peut se laisser porter. En fait, c’est la partie non dansée de quelques huit minutes qui détermine si on tient l’attention sur toute la longueur de la pièce. Le premier soir, un danseur accomplit un étirement de dos au sol en attitude avec buste en opposé puis se met à changer la position par quart de tour ressemblant soudain à ces petits personnages en caoutchouc gluant que des vendeurs de rue jettent sur les vitres des grands magasins. Le deuxième soir, les danseurs se contentent de se chauffer sur scène. Mon attention s’émousse irrémédiablement…

Dans ce programme bien construit, Trio de William Forsythe prend naturellement la suite de Walkaround Time. Lorsque les danseurs (affublés d’improbables costumes bariolés) montrent des parties de leur corps dans le silence, on pense rester dans la veine aride d’un Cunningham. Mais le ludique ne tarde pas à s’immiscer. À l’inverse de Cunningham, Forsythe, ne refuse jamais l’interaction et la complicité avec le public.

Chacune des parties du corps exposées ostensiblement par les interprètes (un coude, la base du cou, une fesse) avec cette « attitude critique du danseur » jaugeant une partie de son anatomie comme s’il s’agissait d’une pièce de viande, deviendra un potentiel « départ de mouvement ».

Car si Cunningham a libéré le corps en en faisant pivoter le buste au dessus des hanches, Forsythe l’a déconstruit et déstructuré. Les emmêlements caoutchouteux de Trio emportent toujours un danseur dans une combinaison chorégraphique par l’endroit même qui lui a été désigné par son partenaire. On reconnaît des séquences de pas, mais elles aussi sont interrompues, désarticulées en cours d’énonciation et reprises plus loin. Ceci répond à la partition musicale, des extraits en boucle d’un quatuor de Beethoven qui font irruption à l’improviste.

Les deux soirs les garçons sont Fabien Revillion, blancheur diaphane de la peau et lignes infinies et décentrées, et Simon Valastro, véritable concentré d’énergie (même ses poses ont du ressort). Quand la partenaire de ces deux compères contrastés est Ludmilla Pagliero, tout est très coulé et second degré. Quand c’est Léonore Guerineau qui mène la danse, tout devient plénitude et densité. Dans le premier cas, les deux garçons jouent avec leur partenaire, dans l’autre, ils gravitent autour d’elle. Les deux approches sont fructueuses.

Avec Herman Schmerman on voit l’application des principes de la libération des centres de départ du mouvement et de la boucle chorégraphique à la danse néoclassique. Le quintette a été crée pour les danseurs du NYCB. Comme à son habitude, le chorégraphe y a glissé des citations du répertoire de la maison avec laquelle il avait été invité à travailler. On reconnaît par exemple des fragments d’Agon qui auraient été accélérés. Les danseurs de l’Opéra se coulent à merveille dans ce style trop souvent dévoyé par un accent sur l’hyper-extension au détriment du départ de mouvement et du déséquilibre. Ici, les pieds ou les genoux deviennent le point focal dans un développé arabesque au lieu de bêtement forcer le penché pour compenser le manque de style. Le trio de filles du 26 avril (mesdemoiselles Bellet, Stojanov et Osmont) se distingue particulièrement. Les garçons ne sont pas en reste. Pablo Legasa impressionne par l’élasticité et la suspension en l’air de ses sauts. Avec lui, le centre du mouvement semble littéralement changer de  situation pendant ses stations en l’air. Vincent Chaillet est lui comme la pointe sèche de l’architecte déconstructiviste qui brise et distord une ligne classique pour la rendre plus apparente.

Dans le pas de deux, rajouté par la suite à Francfort pour Tracy-Kai Maier et Marc Spradling, Amandine Albisson toute en souplesse et en félinité joue le contraste avec Audric Bezard, volontairement plus « statuesque » et marmoréen au début mais qui se laisse gagner par les invites de sa partenaire, qu’il soit gainé de noir ou affublé d’une jupette jaune citron unisexe qui fait désormais partie de l’histoire de la danse.

On ne peut s’empêcher de penser que Millepied a trouvé dans le ballet de l’Opéra, pour lequel il a eu des mots aussi durs que déplacés, des interprètes qui font briller un genre de programme dont il est friand mais qui, avec sa compagnie de techniciens passe-partout, aurait touché à l’ennui abyssal.

 

C’est pour cela qu’on attendait et qu’on aimait Benji à l’Opéra : son œil pour les potentiels solistes.

Après deux décennies de nominations au pif -trop tôt, trop tard ou jamais- de solistes bras cassés ou de méritants soporifiques, cette « génération Millepied » avec ses personnalités bien marquées avait de quoi donner de l’espoir. Dommage que le directeur pressé n’ait pas pris le temps de comprendre l’école et le corps de ballet.

Et voilà, c’est une autre, formée par la direction précédente qui nomme des étoiles et qui récolte le fruit de ce qui a été semé.

Que les soirées soient plus enthousiasmantes du point de vue des distributions ne doit cependant pas nous tromper. Des signes inquiétants de retours aux errements d’antan sont déjà visibles. Le chèque en blanc signé à Jérémie Belingard, étoile à éclipse de la compagnie, pour ses adieux n’est pas de bon augure. Aurélie Dupont offre au sortant une mise en scène arty à grands renforts d’effets lumineux qui n’ont pu que coûter une blinde. Sur une musique qui veut jouer l’atonalité mais tombe vite dans le sirupeux, Bélingard esquisse un pas, roule sur l’eau, remue des pieds la tête en bas dans une veine « teshigaouaresque ».  L’aspiration se veut cosmique, elle est surtout d’un ennui sidéral. Le danseur disparaît sous les effets de lumière. Il laisse le dernier mot à un ballon gonflé à l’hélium en forme de requin : une métaphore de sa carrière à l’opéra? C’est triste et c’est embarrassant.

L’avenir est plus que jamais nébuleux à l’Opéra.

 

Commentaires fermés sur En deux programmes : l’adieu à Benji

Classé dans Humeurs d'abonnés, Retours de la Grande boutique