Archives de Tag: Alice Leloup

Blanche-Neige au miroir de Bordeaux

Les Balletonautes étaient à Bordeaux samedi 22 septembre pour voir le Ballet dans le Blanche Neige de Preljocaj. Fenella et Cléopold découvraient le déjà célèbre opus. Voici leurs pensées exprimées d’abord en anglais puis en français.

Blanche Neige et les 7 « Moines ». Photographie Julien Benhamou

*

 *                                                     *

Honneur aux dames…

Angelin Preljocaj’s sharply and clearly narrated Blanche-Neige is danced with full-out derring-do by the dancers of Bordeaux. While no one can avoid having to address the tropes established by Disney’s 1937 “Snow White,” the choreography sidesteps the saccharine and offers up some delightful surprises. Take the nimble and spidering Dwarves for example, first espied floating up and down to the Frère Jacques theme from Mahler’s First Symphony. Then later, a vivacious dance while circling around the campfire with Blanche will be as grounded as can be…for they are all seated.

Just as he liberates those seven from the prison of cartoonish peppiness, Preljocaj will scrub away at all the clichés glued onto Disney princes and princesses. But he will, alas, succumb to a bad case of Cruella-itis, i.e. that stepmothers (or middle-aged women in general) are all scary lunatics.

The evening starts out as slowly as the dried ice that wafts around the Mother squirming in fatal slo-mo birthing. A cleverly imagined sequence follows – abetted by the ever-inventive set designs of Thierry Leproust – that swiftly deals with the baby’s growth. Then the action grinds to a complete halt, as if we had hit a Petipa divertissement. A looong “let’s dance for the young princess” scene for the corps ensues, albeit danced with energy and élan. Deep pliés in second, turned-in arabesque-penchées, plus turns incited by a palm atop the partner’s head or by a push on any part of the body except the waist, as you’d expect.

Finally our Blanche for the evening, Alice Leloup, took over and immediately brought the audience into her orbit. She radiated soft power as she unleashed the strength of her lean thighs and arms. She used her body’s pent-up energy in a fiercely pliant manner so nuanced that you never tired of watching it. And while her vaguely-Greek-diaper costume emphasizes the legs and torso, Leloup’s reflective face attracts the light.

The score of this ballet is mostly a crazy-quilt of sections from nine of Mahler’s ten symphonies plus some electronic bits. As the adagietto from Symphony #5 swelled into our ears [y’all know it, the one from “Death in Venice”] I feared the worst. Instead, as Leloup spiraled around herself and others, clutching and releasing a red chiffon scarf, that musical chestnut became fresh again. Many scenes, in fact, involve variations on “toss, catch, tease, playful kick.” As to the red scarf, I leave the symbolism up to you. I would point out, however, that nothing relating to sexuality in Blanche-Neige ever gets vulgarly imagined or over-depicted throughout the ballet. The choreography suggests, and respects, that we know all about Freud. And leaves it at that.

Amongst the crowd during the early Petipa part, there had been a guy in an eye-catchingly awful peach-colored toreador outfit (Jean-Paul Gaultier’s costumes turn out to be very hit-or-miss). He danced along with plush energy and a kind of goofy sweetness, and soon it became clear that he was Blanche’s chosen one. As the evening progressed, Oleg Rogachev would demonstrate his gifts as both soloist and partner, completely at ease with the delightfully infinite ways Preljocaj can shape a stage kiss (including a slide down/around/over the Prince’s knees, and a “catch and carry” that all just feel so right). A fine and impassioned actor, Rogachev crafts a very human prince, light-years away from cardboard-cutout Charmings.

Yet the ballet does get mired in Disney when it comes to how both choreographer and costume designer fall into the trap of reiterating the Queen as primarily a cartoonish dominatrix who kick-boxes as wildly as Madame Medusa. She never attempts to hide her evil temper from anyone. If they decided to take this route, then why not fix the eternal problem of “why are so many fairy-tale fathers such oblivious weaklings?” Couldn’t Gaultier have attired the king in leather muzzle and dog collar and gone whole hog on the masochist thing? Or Preljocaj given him more to do than just gently kiss his obviously wacko wife on the brow and then go sit down (again)? The almost non-existent role of the King offered up a complete wasteland that even the keen theatrical intelligence of Alvaro Rodriguez Piñiera could not surmount. He did what he could. What a waste.

Nicole Muratov, as the evil stepmother, also tried to do her best in a role that goes nowhere fast. Defined by relentlessly flexed and karate kicking high-heeled feet from beginning to the end, how could anyone – husband, mirror, or the guy who sneezed in the tenth row — buy into the idea that she was, ever, ever, “the fairest of them all?” Vanity is ugly, folks, especially when it sneers with rage. The only moments when the Stepmother seemed even slightly alluring were during the ritual sessions in her boudoir, where Muratov’s expressive back and Anna Guého’s front –as Mirror – interacted with solemn and deliberate moves.

A sharply-delineated pair of lithe, clever and macha cat familiars attend to the Queen. Alas, the program made it unclear as which dancers were ensconced inside the catsuits. So, to you two of the 22nd: a hearty meow (from a safe distance).

But the shocking and visceral violence of the scene where the evil queen makes the girl eat that poisoned apple is unforgettably powerful. Drawn close, then attacked, Blanche gets pushed down in impossible angles as her back arches away in horror. I even feared for her teeth. Leloup and Muratov’s impeccable timing made it seem that an assault was really taking place on stage. I’m glad I didn’t have a child in my lap for this one.

Nota bene: no reason for this ballet to be intermission-less, a perfect cesura could have taken place after the Stepmother sent The Hunters off on their mission to shoot Blanche.
We could be swiftly brought back into the narrative during the sickening episode of the Deer that follows. In this poignant scene Clara Spitz, as the deer that is sacrificed in place of Blanche, was utterly in command and in the zone. The choreography layers an antlered Graham archetype over weird staccato isolations worthy of the Bride of Frankenstein. When the scene ended and the Hunters carried the Deer offstage, swinging upside down, as broken and limp as a real dead animal, the already well-behaved audience grew even quieter. With this scene, Preljocaj had found the perfect way to illuminate the dark corners of the fairy tales of yore: meaty, casually cruel, fantastical, unpredictable, and utterly devoid of camp.

Blanche Neige. Alice Lepoup et Oleg Rogachev. Photographie Julien Benhamou.

*

 *                                                        *

Au tour de monsieur…

La saison de l’Opéra National de Bordeaux s’est ouverte vendredi dernier. C’est la première d’Eric Quilleré en tant que directeur officiel et la première de son projet artistique. Ce dernier est caractérisé par deux partenariats prestigieux : l’un avec l’Opéra de Paris (dont l’ONB présentera deux productions fortes du répertoire : La Fille mal gardée d’Ashton et Notre Dame de Paris de Petit), l’autre avec la compagnie d’Angelin Preljocaj. Blanche-Neige, du chorégraphe franco-albanais entre ainsi au répertoire du ballet de Bordeaux. Le choix de cette œuvre est des plus pertinents. A terme, Angelin Preljocaj se propose de créer une chorégraphie pour la compagnie. Il s’agit de familiariser les corps et les esprits au travail avec le chorégraphe. Blanche-Neige, créé il y a exactement dix ans, est un ballet d’action pour 24 danseurs avec une production luxueuse et désormais populaire. Il est de surcroit très représentatif, pour le meilleur et le moins bon, du travail du directeur-créateur du Centre Chorégraphique National « de la Région Provence-Alpes-Côte-d’Azur, du Département des Bouches-du-Rhône, de la Communauté du Pays d’Aix, de la Ville d’Aix-en-Provence ».

On découvre l’œuvre, par ailleurs très célèbre, avec la compagnie de Bordeaux et, au début du moins, elle ne nous séduit qu’à moitié. La narration est claire mais parait tout d’abord un peu plaquée. L’histoire s’ouvre sur l’accouchement funèbre de la reine sur un plateau inondé de fumigènes. Le ventre proéminent est rendu presque obscène par un effet de transparence de la robe, laquelle est noire. La reine-mère et la marâtre ne feraient-elles qu’une ? Cette thèse n’est hélas pas clairement suggérée par la suite. Le bébé, grotesquement réaliste, est prélevé par le roi. La reine, apparemment sans vie, est évacuée par deux serviteurs telle une bête morte. Suit une très jolie scène qui par le truchement de deux panneaux présente en raccourci l’enfance de l’héroïne. Le Roi, Alvaro Rodriguez-Piñera (hélas peu utilisé par la suite), virevolte avec le nourrisson qui passé les pendrions, devient une petite fille, une adolescente et enfin la Blanche-Neige à l’orée de l’âge adulte. Mais la scène de bal qui, à l’instar de la Belle au Bois dormant, doit permettre à la jeune princesse de rencontrer des prétendants est péniblement linéaire et peu inspirée. Pour les danses de cour, dans les costumes croquignolets de Jean-Paul Gaultier (les filles ont leur robe saucissonnée dans un harnais soulignant leurs attributs sexuels), les groupes égrainent sagement et sans contrepoint la même chorégraphie terrestre avec des mouvements de bras hyperactifs. Une danse des garçons est, sans surprise, suivie par une danse des filles. Le trio des princes-prétendants est dans le genre musculeux. Oleg Rogatchev, le Prince, ne s’y distingue encore que par le ridicule de son costume, une sorte de brassière à fermeture éclair qui s’enfle au fur et à mesure qu’avance le ballet d’additions jusqu’à s’agrémenter, dans la scène finale, de passementeries surdimensionnées.

L’arrivée tonitruante de la reine-marâtre ne convainc pas non plus. Pas facile en effet de danser en corset, guêpière et talons hauts ou encore d’exprimer quelque chose de riche quand le vocabulaire semble être réduit. Car le look Disney-Barbarella de la méchante reine, l’un des principaux arguments de vente du ballet depuis sa création, curieusement, gène la danse. Il ne permet que des déhanchés et des «grands battements développés kick-boxing». On les retrouvera hélas jusque dans la danse finale des « sabots ardents », conçue sans doute comme une transe de l’Elue du Sacre du Printemps mais qui, pour ne pas se distinguer assez du reste de la chorégraphie, rate plutôt son effet.

Passé ces moments de doute, aggravés par la musique enregistrée de Mahler balancée par une sono un tantinet tonitruante, on passe de bons moments. Pour la reine, les passages du miroir avec une danseuse habillée à l’identique bougeant en complet mimétisme, sont une belle réussite. Les deux cat-women qui accompagnent la narcissique marâtre sont à la fois inquiétantes et divertissantes. Nicole Muratov, l’interprète de la reine, peut même, débarrassée de ses encombrants oripeaux, donner sa mesure dans le pas de deux de la pomme avec Blanche neige, d’une grande violence. Le fruit s’y transforme en instrument de pression et de traction. La haine de l’une et la douleur de l’autre sont palpables.

La production quant à elle est, le plus souvent, un enchantement. La muraille-mine des nains (ici des « moines »), même s’il ne s’agit pas d’une invention (on se souvient de la Damnation de Faust dans la mise en scène de Robert Lepage en 2001), est d’un effet vertigineux. Les sept danseurs en cordée sont tour à tour araignées, sonneurs de cloche ou note mouvante sur une partition. On se sent étourdi comme devant ces films pris au dessus de précipices par des drones. La scène des trois chasseurs-paras magnanimes (beau trio réunissant Ashley Whittle, Felice Barra et Ryota Hasegawa), épargnant l’héroïne mais assassinant un renne-automate (Clara Spitz) dans la forêt graphique conçue par Thierry Leproust et mise en lumière par Patrick Riou, est d’une grande force évocatrice. Le meurtre de l’animal rappelle la « délivrance » de la mère au début du ballet ; cette mère que l’on retrouvera plus tard voletant au dessus du corps inanimé de Blanche-Neige,  telle une marionnette balinaise.

La chorégraphie recèle aussi de beaux moments. Le ballet décolle dès la scène, dite des « amoureux ». Blanche Neige y batifole dans une clairière au milieu de quatre couples posés sur de gros galets. Elle rencontre pour la deuxième fois son prince. La gestion des groupes est fluide et les interprètes ont matière à s’exprimer. Parfois, avec très peu, Preljocaj parvient à dire beaucoup. L’amitié entre les nains et leur jeune protégée est dessinée par une ronde au sol, très simple mais très efficace. Les danseurs et la danseuse font des ponts et frappent leurs mains. C’est à la fois tendre et beau.

Les solo et pas de deux de Blanche-Neige et de son prince ne manquent jamais de force ni de poésie : cambrés, tournoiements, beaux ports de bras fluides qui caressent. Alice Leloup, dans son costume d’Isadora Duncan revisité, a une rondeur du visage enfantine mais la musculature d’une Diane chasseresse. Il se dégage de sa danse une certaine innocence jusque dans ses poses les plus osées. On se réjouit également de voir Oleg Rogachev avec une partenaire qui convient bien à son lyrisme et à sa douceur. Dans le pas de deux du cercueil, le prince actionne Blanche-Neige apparemment morte telle une poupée désarticulée et son désespoir est palpable jusque dans sa façon d’entremêler ses cuisses à celles de sa partenaire.

Au final, on se réjouira plutôt de cette entrée au répertoire. Ballet inégal mais spectacle réussi, il permet d’apprécier encore une fois l’élégance de la troupe de Bordeaux et de distinguer au sein du corps de ballet des solistes potentiels.

Blanche Neige. Saluts. Oleg Rogatchev, Angelin Preljocaj et Alice Leloup.

 

 

Publicités

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs