Archives de Tag: Beatrice Carbone

Trances in Toulouse

Toulouse, La Halle aux Grains

Toulouse, La Halle aux Grains

« Eh bien dansez, maintenant! ». Toulouse. Ballet du Capitole. Saturday, June 27th.

“The fever called ‘Living’/ Is conquered at last.”

As Johan Inger’s “Walking Mad” began, I suddenly recalled an old cartoon. A sage, replete with toga and sandals, points his staff at an X in the corner of the map of a university philosophy department. The caption asks: “why are you here?”

Demian Vargas, trench-coated and bowler-hatted, wandering near the front row, has clearly lost his map. This Magritte-like apparition soon clambers up on to the stage as Ravel’s unsettling “Bolero” begins. We — and a company of beings seemingly even more feverish  and seemingly more broken –will seek the answer together.

 Out of the dark depths of the stage, an evil and fleet-footed protean wall sneaks up on him. As does a vision in white, Solène Monnereau, who makes concentrating on scooping up the limp T- shirts littering the floor a Bauschian moment.  Briefly distracted by our hapless intruder, she lets herself be scooped up by the deft Valerio Mangianti.  The mere touch (and then real power) of Mangianti’s hovering arms cannot be resisted. Why is his persona wearing a house dress? I leave it you to figure out, but the dress does let you see how deeply his movements are rooted in the ground and spiral up from a sure place.

The wall keeps flapping around, rolling, falling, re-configuring itself, dextrously manipulated from behind. To be banged on, clung to, slipped around, grasped, almost scaled, resisting all attempts to breech it.

Sooner or later, you arrive at one certainty: being alive is not meant for the faint-hearted. It gives you fever. Our guy, now divested of his trench-coat – and many bowler hats will now flow through the hands of his new posse – has either found his way to insane people or to a world of his own feverish imagination. This condition is often surprisingly jolly Inger’s kinetic choreography keeps playing sly switches on your expectations of “what should come next.”

Indeed, this bitter-sweet ballet is full of fun surpises. Inger’s vocabulary clearly developed while devoting his own body to Kylian’s world. Lurch your mid and upper-body forward and a partner will grab you under the arms and swoop you around in grande seconde plié. He also makes deft use of Forsythe’s – “pick a card, any card” [i.e. any part of the body] free-style.  Push off of or onto any point of an opposing body, including your own, and see where you end up. But these moments come an go. Nothing here feels derivative or predicable or old hat.

Walking Mad. Julie Loria.Photographie David Herrero

Walking Mad. Julie Loria.Photographie David Herrero

The group dons pointy noses, and also nurse them atop their heads. More lost laundry and more fevered figures come and go, each finding a new way to be annoyed by the amorphous wall. Matthew Astley, both goofy and pure of line, attacks each step as if dance had been invented by Beckett.  Julie Loria – restless to her fingertips — in a red tremble, sets the guys atremble too. You want to both laugh and cry, then, when Loria slaps herself into the corner of the wall (now a pointy imploding wedge) and tries to pull her own shadows back into her orbit.

That wall means everything and nothing. We are all mad or being alive means being mad. You have choices to make. Will you accept life in the form of a madhouse or a funhouse?  Do you want to go it alone or dare to try to pull another into your body and mind?

But, alas, there’s more. And this has been bothering me. Boléro, especially as stopped and restarted here in very unexpected ways, can cover about 15 to even 25 perfect minutes. Inger, and the dancers of Toulouse, made this musical warhorse seem fresh and new and pure and precisely as weirdly logical and illogical as it should be. Why did he have to add an appendix?

 “All that we see or seem /Is but a dream within a dream.”

 For his finale — a so sad and sobering, utterly unfunny and intense duet of irresolution – Inger could have even used another overused stalwart: silence. Alas, no.

Instead, way back in 2001, he fell on one of Arvo Pärt’s throbbing and repetitive scores, which have rapidly become even more of a dance world cliché than Boléro.  At this point, someone needs to lock them up in a wall-safe.

Ravel’s Bolero repeats itself — and how! – but, especially as teased apart as in the soundscape for the first part of the ballet, it launched the dancers on a crazy journey. Pärt’s music just sits in place and goes nowhere. Given Inger’s intelligence in constructing the giddily vivid first part. I am sure he intended to sober us up, to make us feel as trapped as Juliette Thélin and Demian Vargas. This pas de deux further distills the desperate need to escape over that wall. These two worked their bodies into tender and somber places and chiseled away at each moment. Simply holding out a coat to the other, a tiny crick of the neck, epitomized how small gestures can be enormous. They sucked the audience down into their vortex of a dream within a dream. Despite my irritation with the music, I was gulled too. This expressive, expressionistic, parable of “alone-together” reminded me of Gertrude Stein’s purported last words: “What is the answer?” The room stared at her. Silence She picked up on that. “Then, what is the question?”

*

*                                              *

“Keeping time, time, time./In a sort of Runic rhyme,/To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells/from the bells, bells, bells.”

Cantata. Tabatha Rumeur, Julie Charlet, les musicienne du groupe ASSURD et ensemble. Photographie : David Herrero

Cantata. Tabatha Rumeur, Julie Charlet, les musicienne du groupe ASSURD et ensemble. Photographie : David Herrero

Maybe singing and dancing and banging on something are the answer after all, according to Mauro Bigonzetti’s Cantata.

Instead of a moving wall, here we had an ambulating wall of oaky and resonant sound provided by the powerful voices and bodies of the Southern Italian musical collective ASSURD. Weaving in and out amongst the dancers on stage, the singers’ voices and instruments cried, yelled, lullaby-ed, coaxed, spat, spangled. And, along with the dancers, managed indeed to help us understand why we needed to be here, in Toulouse.

At first, you kind of go: uh, oh. Chorale singing, an accordion being squeezed onstage by a small and loud barefoot woman, women dancers who twist alone and twitch if lifted. Back on the ground, they return to poses that make them look like arthritic trees that died from thirst. After a bunch of men dump them in a pile atop each other, the women continue to squirm, bite their hands, and put fingers in their mouths to pull at the skin of their faces. Ah, got it, Southern Italy. Tarantula bites. Means more madness, eh? But these gestures – just at the moment when I went “uh oh” yet one more time – continued down a Forsythian path, setting off major locomotion.

The tammurriata and tammorra, like Ariadne’s thread, will lead our dancers back to the world of the living. Honey, the tinkly “tambourine,” as we know it from Balanchine, Mère Simone, and Bob Dylan, has nothing to do with the Kodo-ish propulsion of these gigantic hand-held objects. The rhythms are strict, not shimmied or approximate, nor is the dance. And what a fun sound to try to use your body to interpret!  Do a conga line bent over on your knees: march forward with your elbows hitting the ground like feet, chin in hand, then slap the floor with your palms. Feel your weight. Now we’re going somewhere.

Cantata. Béatrice Carbone. Photographie : David Herrero

Cantata. Béatrice Carbone. Photographie : David Herrero

Here couples don’t yearn to scale any wall, they merely try to rise above any limits and then return to stamp at the soil of the earth. Women step all over men’s recumbent bodies, and evolve from being manipulated to being manipulators. Arms reject swanny elegance: chicken wings preferred. A black-widow sunflower, Beatrice Carbone, all curled arms and cupped fingers, distances herself from the crowd. A duet: hands hit together, or try to. Dancers repeatedly find calm by taking the hands of others and brushing them over their faces. Avetik Karapetyan continues to remind me of the explosive and expressive Gary Chryst of the Joffrey. Maria Gutierez shimmies and shines in a new way every time I see her.  The action transforms itself into a raucous and joyous frenzy.

At the very end, the company blows us a kiss. And you want to stay right here.

Why Toulouse? Kader Belarbi’s company of individuals, and the opportunities his keenly-chosen repertory gives them, provides the best answer of all.

Quotes are from Edgar Allan Poe. “For Annie;” “A Dream[…]”; “The Bells ».
Publicités

Commentaires fermés sur Trances in Toulouse

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs, Humeurs d'abonnés

Toulouse : Fourmis et cigales

Toulouse, La Halle aux Grains

Toulouse, La Halle aux Grains

Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse : « Eh bien dansez, maintenant! » 27/06/2015

On savait bien que l’injonction de fourmi industrieuse qui regroupait sous son verbe les deux pièces présentées n’était qu’un prétexte. La saison dernière, à la même époque, le programme « Valsez ! » était en fait un hommage au tango. Mais il y en est ainsi du pouvoir des titres. Ils colorent imperceptiblement notre perception des œuvres.

Fourmis…

On se souvient encore de Johan Inger, le long et élégant danseur blond du Nederlands Dans Theater qui magnifiait de sa présence posée et paisible les pièces très élaborées et quelque peu dépressives de Jiri Kylian à l’aube des années 2000. Son ballet, Walking Mad (2001), doit ainsi beaucoup à l’influence de maître de La Haye et, par ricochet, aux expérimentations de Forsythe dans les années 90. Le principal dispositif scénique de la pièce, un mur mouvant à géométrie variable, se déclinant en une multitude de portes et se rétractant parfois pour former un plancher de danse supplémentaire, n’est pas sans évoquer l’iconique mur d’Enemy In the Figure. Les danseurs s’y accrochent souvent comme ces petit personnages gélatineux jetés contre des vitres proposés aux enfants dans les rues par des marchands à la sauvette. L’une des grandes qualités de la pièce est son absurdité assumée. Une absurdité tendre. Le point de départ est simple : un type en imper gris pluie et chapeau melon assorti (Damian Vargas) monte sur scène où une fille triste (Solène Monnereau) récolte des T-shirt de couleur. Elle refuse l’offrande de son imperméable. Les deux danseurs tapent contre le mur, ce qui les propulse dans un monde coloré. Deux autres filles (Julie Loria et Juliette Thélin) et une cohorte de mâles affolés, parfois de désir, et parfois agités tout court, entrent alors dans la danse. Tout ce petit monde ressemble à une colonie de fourmis industrieuses qui auraient consommé quelques substances illicites. Les passes de partnering, extrêmement techniques, créent un sentiment de perpétuel évitement. Les filles roulent, s’enroulent autour des garçons mais c’est pour toujours leur échapper. Cette ronde de séduction se pose avec beaucoup d’intelligence sur le Boléro de Ravel. Ce n’est pas la moindre qualité de cette pièce d’avoir abordé une œuvre musicale tellement liée au XXe siècle à la vision qu’en a donné Maurice Béjart. À l’occasion, on reconnaît même des petits clins d’œil à ce ballet mythique. Sur une partie du mur érigée en estrade de danse, Valerio Mangianti, sculptural et élégant, improvise une danse de séduction. Les autres garçons prennent aussi des poses de matador. Mais ils sont coiffés de chapeaux de fée et leur dignité ne fait pas le poids. On les retrouve bientôt tremblant des genoux tels de piteux élus du Sacre du printemps, version Nijinsky. Dans ces rôles de « mâle mis à mal », le jeune Matthew Astley est particulièrement irrésistible avec sa tignasse rousse et ses mimiques d’ahuri touchant.

"Walking Mad". Shizen Kazama et Julie Loria. Photo : David Herrero

« Walking Mad ». Shizen Kazama et Julie Loria. Photo : David Herrero

Cette lecture à la fois loufoque et poétique de la « chanson scie » de Ravel aurait suffi à notre bonheur. Dans sa dernière section, celle du – nécessaire ? – retour à la réalité et à la grisaille, sur le Für Alina d’Arvo Pärt, une pièce abondamment chorégraphiée dans les années 2000, Johan Inger surprend moins avec une gestuelle proche de l’esthétique de Mats Ek.

Cigales…

Avec Cantata, de Mauro Bigonzetti, on commence par un chant de voix blanches, des voix de danseurs rangés tout serrés dans un carre de lumière, bientôt relayé par les accents rauques des chanteuses du groupe Assurd. Dans ce ballet, les hommes et les femmes apparaissent d’abord dans des rôles très clivés. Serrées les unes contre les autres, encadrées d’un demi-cercle d’hommes menaçants et prédateurs, les femmes se contorsionnent la bouche ouverte. Les mâles se meuvent lentement ou se figent, tels des statues implacables. On pense cette fois au Sacre de Pina Bausch, impression renforcée par les robes-chasuble mi-longues qu’elles portent. Sont-elles oppressées, opprimées, ou en prise à ces fièvres par piqûre d’araignées pour lesquelles chaque région d’Italie du Sud a inventé sa tarentelle spécifique?

"Cantata". Maksat Sydykov et Maria Gutierrez. Photographie : David Herrero

« Cantata ». Maksat Sydykov et Maria Gutierrez. Photographie : David Herrero

Mais les clivages sont bientôt questionnés. Maria Gutierrez, ancrant les pieds dans le sol comme personne, change d’homme en cours de pas de deux. Commençant avec un partenaire à la virilité agressive (le puissant Avetik Katapetyan, un colosse dont on s’étonne toujours de voir la suspension aérienne des sauts), elle termine sur une note de partage avec Maksat Sydykov qui prend sa suite. Avec l’apparition de la tammorra, cet énorme tambourin tendu d’une peau de chèvre, aux cymbales d’étain, les femmes prennent lentement la main. Le solo puissant d’une fille en robe noire et aux cheveux lâchés (Béatrice Carbone) semble le signe de cette révolution. Puis, dans un double duo, les filles piétinent allègrement la poitrine des garçons étendus au sol qui les ont soulevées sur leur dos, telles des vierges de procession, tout en faisant des pompes (Jeremy Leydier est particulièrement remarquable dans ce passage par sa puissance d’interprétation). Par la suite, un garçon hésite timidement entre deux filles et pose la main sur le ventre de l’une d’entre elles. Il n’est pas sélectionné.

Plus on avance, plus la pièce estompe les clivages de genre pour laisser place à la transe de la fête.

C’est ainsi qu’au travers de 10 « danses chantées », on brise la glace avec tout un petit monde, un peu comme un voyageur tour à tour effrayé, abasourdi, interpellé (un épisode assez drôle de dialogue de sourds entre un Italien et un Français) et … entraîné dans la danse. On découvre un coin d’Italie du sud sans avoir vu un pas d’une authentique danse napolitaine. Mais cette réalité reconstruite vaut bien le détour.

Vaut le détour… Une appellation on le concède un peu touristique mais qui définit bien ce qu’on pense de la compagnie façonnée depuis trois saisons par Kader Belarbi. Ses danseurs passent avec succès du répertoire baroque (La Fille d’Ivo Cramer) au formalisme intriqué d’un Noureev en passant par le lyrisme d’un Lifar ou l’expressionisme des chorégraphies contemporaines.

Spectateurs curieux, spectateurs blasés… Allez à Toulouse !

Ballet du Capitole de TOulouse. Photographie : David Herrero

Ballet du Capitole de TOulouse. Photographie : David Herrero

Commentaires fermés sur Toulouse : Fourmis et cigales

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs

Toulouse: Roses Bloom Beyond Paris (2/3)

DAY ONE: THE BALLET DU CAPITOLE, TOULOUSE (evening of October 25)

Photo Patrice Nin / Théâtre du Capitole

Photo Patrice Nin / Théâtre du Capitole

LES MIRAGES (Lifar/Sauguet/Cassandre)

“Then you shall judge yourself,” the king answered. “That is the most difficult thing of all. […] If you succeed in judging yourself rightly, then you are indeed a man of true wisdom.”

Everyone who teaches a class on Existentialism should simply force the students to watch these two ballets – Les Mirages and Les Forains — and then tell them to hide all those hundreds of pages by Sartre under their beds along with their ripe underwear. Next assignment: go sit in a café and watch those passing by over a glass of the cheapest wine on the menu. Just what are all these people on the sidewalks running after? Love? Money? The moon and the stars? What do they think they will find in the end?

The story of Les Mirages is very much as if, say, a rather more ripe little prince had landed in a never-never-land filled with women, should have known better, and realized – a bit too late — that there’s no place like home. The fresh intensity of the Toulouse company’s interpretation kept me wondering – even if of course I knew – what would happen next.

In a smaller house, on a smaller stage, almost everything seemed magnified, larger than life: the music, the set, the costumes, the dancers.

The men of Toulouse are brawnier than those in Paris, and that physique brings us back to the 1940’s in a very positive way. More Jean Marais than Gérard Philipe, Avetik Karapetyan’s “Jeune Homme,” a faultless technician and obviously reassuring partner (five very distinct women at least, plus the random passerby!) brought that indefinable charisma that makes one of those “god I’m on the stage almost for the entire 45 minutes and I am playing a jerk and always turn to the right” roles seem like one of the best kinds of roles you could hope for. He gave an archetype a soul.

Les Mirages. Maria Gutierrez (l'ombre). Photographie Francette Levieux

Les Mirages. Maria Gutierrez (l’Ombre). Photographie Francette Levieux

Maria Gutierrez’s sharply-distilled, yet unsettlingly tender, L’Ombre – the clueless young man’s shadow, his shade, his subconscious, the truth about himself that he doesn’t want to face –was likened by Cléopold to a guardian angel. We both noticed the subtle way that she and Karapetyan seemed a microsecond off of the polished synchronization you get at the Paris Opera. And that opened our eyes. Suddenly the point of l’Ombre, to me, evoked Echo and her frustrations with a beloved Narcissus. She is unable to speak first yet ever condemned to always have the last word. More than saddened by her charge’s repeated follies – his chasing after Caroline Betancourt’s shifty bird of paradise, who moved so fast she blurred, or seeming to learn to breathe again while clasping Beatrice Carbone’s graciously swirling Art Deco curves to what he thinks is his heart – Gutierrez’s frustrated stabs at the ground with her toes, her wind-milling arms, her sudden still balances, all conspired to break my heart. I’ve never seen an Ombre so saddened by human folly. And the only way to do this is to turn off the Parisienne’s chic, to let go of irony. To despair, as one might have, in 1944.

*

*         *

LES FORAINS (R.Petit/Sauguet/Bérard)

“It is such a secret place, the land of tears.”

I have a soft spot for Les Forains [The Carneys]. That’s when I first spotted –evening after evening – Myriam Ould-Braham seeming to glow as one of the Siamese twins in Paris. Here I couldn’t focus my eyes exclusively on anyone, for the passion of everyone on stage, including that of the “spectators,” became overwhelming. Did you know that Piaf needed to record a new song based on the mood and music after seeing this very ballet?

I wonder what more Piaf would have given that song if Philippe Béran had been conducting and she had seen this company.

The Toulouse dancers, even when “just watching” with little to do, redefined the phrase “I belong to a company.” That group feeling became completely electrifying and amplified the impact of this terrible story about the loss of hope: a starving family circus troupe along with some minor talents it has adopted, put on a show and then try to pass around the hat. Day after day after day. Roland Petit’s ballet, which premiered in March 1945, recounts just one of those hungry and hopeless days. It makes you feel like an overfed voyeur content to look through a spyglass at human misery, and who brushes it off while looking for a taxi.  Alas, this is one story that will never go out of date.

Les Forains.  Artyom Maksakov (le prestidigitateur) et Beatrice Carbone (la belle endormie). Photographie Francette Levieux.

Les Forains. Artyom Maksakov (le Prestidigitateur) et Beatrice Carbone (la Belle endormie). Photographie Francette Levieux.

Yet the ballet, like hope, can be delicious if danced by the likes of Artyom Maksakov (a generous and unusually youthful and hopeful Magician, heartbreaking in the subtle way he declined how his illusions of patriarchal strength was been chipped at and then shattered by an axe-like blow near the end – what an actor!); Alexander Akulov (not only a Clown blessed with ballon and élan but…what an actor! He almost convinced me that his character was called “The Narrator”); Beatrice Carbone (fearless as The Beauty Asleep, she seemed to galvanize the onstage onlookers with energy forged by many Kitris); and Virginie Baïet-Dartigalongue (as Loïe Fulller—who remembers Loie Fuller? — who literally set the stage the moment the weary beauty of her persona walked out on to it).

A rapt audience seemed to float out of the theater, their heads in the clouds still. Yet feet dragged, for this meant leaving Sauguet’s music and Toulouse’s dancers behind and returning to this mundane earth.  I yearned to doff my hat but, alas, it proved to be only a « boa constrictor from the outside » and needed time to digest these delicious treats.

[All citations are from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s « The Little Prince » from 1943, in its translation by Katherine Woods].

2 Commentaires

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs

Une expérience de mélancolie positive à Toulouse (Lifar-Petit-Sauguet)

Théâtre du Capitole - salle. Crédit : Patrice Nin

Théâtre du Capitole – salle. Crédit : Patrice Nin

Les Mirages – Les Forains Lifar-Petit-Sauguet). Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse 25/10/2014

Bienvenue dans le monde de l’après-guerre. Voilà, outre les accents mélancoliques de la musique d’Henri Sauguet, le lien entre Les Mirages de Lifar (pourtant conçu à la fin de l’Occupation) et Les Forains de Petit. Le maître, Lifar, regarde vers l’onirisme et le surréalisme – il y a un peu de Dali et de Max Ernst dans le néo-baroque palais de la lune de Cassandre – et Petit, « l’élève rebelle » vers le néo-réalisme, mais c’est bien un même sentiment qui s’en dégage; un sentiment, tissé de fatalisme hérité de quinze années de grisailles et de vert de gris mais aussi d’impétuosité rageuse, qui accouchera de l’existentialisme. Le costume de l’ombre des Mirages, avec ses gants intégraux gris, n’est pas sans faire référence à la mode faite de bric et de broc des années d’occupation et le paysage désolé de la fin, peuplé de paysans déjà anachroniques n’est pas loin d’évoquer un chanp après la bataille. Dans Forains, le noir et le gris constituent l’essentiel de la palette, simplement trouée par les deux draps sang de bœuf du théâtre improvisé.

Pas de doute, Kader Belarbi est un programmateur intelligent.

Le ballet du Capitole de Toulouse s’empare ainsi de deux monuments du répertoire parisien, peu représentés habituellement à l’extérieur de ses murs.

Les Mirages de Lifar était sans aucun doute le transfert le plus délicat des deux. Le style Lifar de 1944-47 a plus de caractères propres et « exotiques » au ballet de style international dansé actuellement. C’est donc une expérience étrange que de voir ce ballet dansé par une autre compagnie que le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris. D’un point de vue de la production, on doit reconnaître que le Palais imaginé par Cassandre souffre un peu de se retrouver dans un espace plus étroit qu’à Paris. Et les éclairages, plus forts, parasitent quelque peu la magie. Du coup, les admirables costumes très « école de Paris », paraissent presque trop forts. Aussi, à ce stade de l’acclimatation, les Toulousains ont incontestablement beaucoup travaillé mais ils ne respirent pas encore la geste lifarienne. Les chimères agitent leurs doigts d’une manière un peu trop consciente et certaines poses iconiques manquent de clarté. Pourtant, l’expérience s’avère passionnante. L’éclairage plus cru (aussi bien du côté des kilowatts que des corps en mouvement) donne une fraîcheur séduisante à l’ensemble. Certains interprètes se distinguent particulièrement. Le marchand au ballon roublard de Maxime Clefos, les deux courtisanes candy-crush aux pirouettes jubilatoires (Julie Loria et Virginie Baïet-Dartigalongue) ou encore la chimère bondissant comme un geyser de Caroline Bettancourt. C’était un peu comme voir un chef-d’œuvre du Technicolor restauré dans toute la violence un peu brute de décoffrage de sa palette d’origine.

Les Mirages : Maria Gutierrez et Avetyk Karapetyan. Photo Francette Levieux. Courtesy of Théâtre du Capitole.

Les Mirages : Maria Gutierrez et Avetyk Karapetyan. Photo Francette Levieux. Courtesy of Théâtre du Capitole.

Dans le couple central Avetik Karapetyan développe une danse puissante mais jamais en force. Il semble ancré dans le sol sans jamais paraître lourd ni manquer de ballon. Il a également une manière particulière  de connecter avec chacune de ses  cinq partenaires féminines, par le regard ou par le toucher, qui rend son personnage vibrant et crédible. Ce jeune homme n’est en aucun cas une idée de jeune homme ou un poète. C’est un être de chair soumis aux passions de son âge. Face à lui, Maria Guttierez, dans le rôle de l’ombre, réalise le plus joli contresens qu’il m’ait été donné de voir depuis que j’ai découvert ce ballet. Les traits du visage vidés d’expression mais le regard intense, elle ressemble, au choix, à un chat écorché ou à une mère à qui son rejeton aurait donné tous les sujets de souffrance. Elle n’est pas le double, l’ombre du jeune homme, mais un ange gardien épuisé de ressasser des conseils à un mauvais sujet qui ne les écoute jamais. Moins qu’en miroir, ses poses communes avec son partenaire se font toujours avec un subtil décalage, comme en canon. Sa variation a quelque chose de moins flotté que ce qu’on attend habituellement. Mais la tension, la charge émotive qui se distille alors dans la salle est énorme même si c’est plus sa douleur à elle que l’on plaint que celle du jeune homme. Dans le final, cela devient très poignant. L’acceptation du jeune homme devient une sorte de déclaration d’amour faite de guerre lasse. L’ombre lit dans le grand livre de l’histoire de son amant, toujours inquiète, puis se cache derrière lui, comme accablée par ce qu’elle a lu. C’est à vous tirer des larmes.

Les Forains, ballet du Capitole de Toulouse. Photographie Francette Levieux. Courtesy of Théâtre du Capitole.

Les Forains, ballet du Capitole de Toulouse. Photographie Francette Levieux. Courtesy of Théâtre du Capitole.

Les Forains est également un ballet lacrymal. Une quantité d’images fortes, de vignettes inoubliables qui dépassent la danse vous assaillent le cœur : la petite fille qui berce sa cage à colombes en osier, le clown qui essuie mécaniquement son maquillage, comme abasourdi, après que le public a tourné le dos sans payer… C’est sombre et mélancolique  une photographie nocturne de Brassaï qui se serait animée. Dès que Virginie Baïet-Dartigalogue, qui plus tard sera Loïe Fuller, est entrée, semblant porter en elle toute la fatigue et l’accablement des longues marches et de la faim rien que par la façon dont elle agitait machinalement son éventail, on s’y est trouvé transporté.

Comme chez Lifar, la technique n’importe pas tant que l’expression (ce qui n’empêche pas Alexander Akulov d’impressionner par sa maîtrise impeccable dans le rôle du clown). Alors qu’importe que le prestidigitateur, Artyom Maksakov, nouveau venu dans la compagnie, soit plus un sauteur qu’un tourneur car il a mis toute sa fragile juvénilité dans le rôle. Il est un chef de troupe dont l’enthousiasme (visible dans sa variation avec la belle endormie de Béatrice Carbone) se brise lorsque l’escarcelle reste vide après le spectacle. On le voit s’effondrer littéralement. Est-ce lui qui console la petite acrobate (Louison Catteau, charmante jusque dans la maladresse) ou l’inverse?

Lorsqu’on est sorti sur la place du Capitole, rougeoyant discrètement sous l’éclat un peu étouffé de l’éclairage public, cette question restait en suspens dans notre esprit, flottant confusément au milieu des réminiscences de la belle musique de Sauguet.

Quelle curieuse sensation de se sentir à la fois mélancolique et rasséréné !

Commentaires fermés sur Une expérience de mélancolie positive à Toulouse (Lifar-Petit-Sauguet)

Classé dans Blog-trotters (Ailleurs), France Soirs